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Hi Everyone.

 

I just ordered a Lucey!  As you can imagine I'm super excited.  But now, as I wait, buyer's remorse sets in...well not remorse, but worry.

 

My background is I'm a very confident quilter, published author, pattern designer etc.  I've been quilting for more than 20 years and I've quilted most of my quilts on my DSM.  I know and love my DSM very well.  I have a Viking and I almost never have any trouble.  Might have to tweak the tension once in a while but other than that it's a work horse.  I've had it 9 years and had it serviced only once.  And I'm embarrassed to say I'm terrible about cleaning it.  I almost never do and I usually only change the needle when it breaks.  

 

So, as you can imagine I'm nervous about maintaining a longarm.  I've been reading around this forum and all the tension troubles etc are scaring me.  I'm really not worried that I won't be able to do it.  I'm mechanically inclined and good at troubleshooting etc so I'm fairly confident that I'll get it to work.  I'm just nervous that I won't like it.  Fiddling with a machine and having to clean it a lot is so not my thing!

 

So really do I have to clean out the bobbin case every time I change it?  And oil and clean the machine after every quilt?

 

And am I really going to have to spend forever balancing the tension?  

 

I'm also concerned about thread.  I really wasn't a snob.  For many years I used the basic Coats Dual Duty in all my quilts.  Never had a problem, even without cleaning.  But I have been converted to Aurifil.  I love it.  The colors are awesome.  Its smooth and beautiful.  And I love that it's cotton.  I know that poly isn't really "sharp" anymore, but I like to use all cotton (fabric, batting, thread).  So I'm wondering if I'll be able to stick to Aurfil 50wt.  I'd really rather not explore threads forever.  Maybe I'll try So Fine or something for a thread that disappears a little more in the cases that I need that, but do you think I'll be able to make Aurifil work?  Oh, I should have mentioned that I'll mostly be quilting for me.  Maybe a few customer quilts but mostly I ordered a longarm because I want to continue to do it all start to finish myself.

 

I wish I could believe that Lucey will just work without a lot of thought or care.  Is that possible??? Or should I be getting my mind ready for a change?

 

Thanks!!

Jess

 

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Dear Jess, you have asked some really great questions!  I have owned APSQ since 2007. Time flies! So, from my experience, I will help answer your questions.

 

So really do I have to clean out the bobbin case every time I change it?   No...and Maybe Yes... it depends on if you have a lot of lint in the bobbin area. Cotton threads tend to be linty.  From the start, I began a good habit of keeping my machine clean and oiled regularly. I am religious about it. I believe that this habit has kept my machine running smoothly and I rarely ever have issues with tension or quilting. One of the most important tools I invested in was a small air compressor to blow out my empty bobbin case, I also blow out the bobbin area, blow off my table, blow around my wheels. I love this thing. It was the best $$$ I ever spent on a tool and I use it every day. It only takes less than one minute to do all of this. Depending on how much I use the machine, once every 2 to 3 weeks, or once a month, I do a total cleaning of the bobbin area. It only takes 5-10 minutes max to perform this maintenance. I remove the needle bar plate and blow the bobbin area all out with the air compressor and clean out the oil buildup using a few squirts of WD40, then I spin that WD40 out, wipe down the walls of the bobbin area and after I am done wiping it out, I use machine oil to lubricate the bobbin hook assembly. I swear that this routine has kept my machine running in tip top condition. I also dab a little bit rubbing alcohol or windex on the rails to wipe it clean of oxidation.

 

Do I oil and clean the machine after every quilt?   Blow out the bobbin area? YES! Clean the machine after every quilt NO.

 

And am I really going to have to spend forever balancing the tension?  No... just like all of us, we learn the technique. It just takes a little time to go through the learning period. We've all been there, done that.  The trick is to get the bobbin tension set, then only mess with the top tension. I mainly use Bottom Line in my bobbin, but I use about every type of thread under the sun in the top, so I make slight adjustments to my top tension. It takes me less then 30 seconds to set my top tension, depending on the thread I am using. Most times, I use So Fine or King Tut or Omni, but I have all kinds of thread.

 

I'm also concerned about thread.  I really wasn't a snob.  For many years I used the basic Coats Dual Duty in all my quilts.  Never had a problem, even without cleaning.  But I have been converted to Aurifil. So I'm wondering if I'll be able to stick to Aurfil 50wt.  50 wt. Aurfil is a great thread, but it is super thin. You can try using it exclusively on top (and bobbin) but there might be times when you want to have a fatter thread. I usually use a 30 weight on top, but I also use So Fine 50 wt. on top, too. I really like it!  You can use what ever thread you want to use. Is Coats Dual Duty a good top thread?? I don't know any thing about the dual duty as a quilting thread. I would be concerned it wasn't "durable" enough for a topstitching thread.

 

I wish I could believe that Lucey will just work without a lot of thought or care.  Is that possible??? Or should I be getting my mind ready for a change?  Don't worry too much about this, but I would recommend that from the start, you should get into the habit of maintaining a clean machine (especially in the bobbin area). A clean machine is a happy machine. Keep its bobbin hook assembly area blown out, clean and oiled and it will perform well and you won't have issues. It just takes a few minutes. Besides my beloved air compressor, I also keep a small lightweight vacuum nearby to my machine. I run that thing many times to keep threads and lint and other stuff (dust bunnies) off of the floor and sticking to the batting.

 

Have fun with your new Lucy.

Shana


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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Hi, Jess. I am a relative newbie, too. I just got a sit down long arm, a baby lock Tiara. I don't know how different it is than a regular long arm, but I am not finding it to be a lot of work to clean and oil, etc. You just get into a routine. Mine just requires oil in the bobbin area and I run a brush around in there to clean it. Once I got the hang of adjusting tension, it doesn't seem to be that big of a deal. I got this machine off of ebay, it is 1 year old, and I love it. I bought a used sit down model because I have really bad neck pain issues. I was looking at long arms and went to the quilting store and test drove a stand up model. I know they had the table set too low, because I am tall, but I had really bad pain for days afterward. Since I can sit and sew on a limited basis, I decided to try a sit down model. I got a very good deal on  the used one, and this way I have not invested as much money, in case it doesn't work out. I have made a few quilts, but did the quilting on my embroidery machine. So now I am doing my first one on the long arm. I am about 1/2 way done and I love doing it. Can't sew today at all because of pain. I guess I am going to have to limit myself to about an hour at a time. Anyway, I find that oiling it and cleaning out lint, etc. is not a big deal. You can use any thread you want!  Just use your favorites! It is so cool to have all the options. I am going to  slowly try different kinds, but now I am using Superior cotton and Bottom Line, because that is what the seller gave me and recommended to me.  I was worried, too, but for different reasons. I feel like I spent a lot of $ and now I have to limit my use of the machine. But I knew that was going to happen. I am just going to try and enjoy what I can do.  I think that once you get it, you will love it. Especially since you are already an experienced quilter. It is not that much work. Remember, people post usually when they have a problem, not when things are smooth sailing.  I truly think you will love it, and you will get used to it quickly. I love mine and am glad I went for it. I wish you much luck and I hope you update us on how things are going.


Peggy

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I am wondering, tho, about the compressed air. When I bought my  12 needle embroidery machine, they told me to NOT use compressed air to blow out the bobbin area, as this can force lint and dust INTO the machine. So I just use a brush to clean it out, or vacume it. I have noticed on this forum that several people have mentioned using an air compressor on this area, so just wondering about this issue.


Peggy

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Petmomful the APQS machines are true industrial machines.  The area around  the hook assembly is sealed, so we can blow the dust bunnies away, then use the compressor to blow the dust bunnies off the floor and out the back door... and then.


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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Ok on compressed air, most dealers of dsm machines don't want you to use it as it pushes lint into areas you shouldn't be messing in so a brush is one of the ways to go as with embroidery machines. I have a friend with a handiquilter and the said not to use compressed air on her machine, it noticed that there was more exposed under the arm. APQS machines are great, yes I have had some issues, and regretfully say it wasn't the machine, but me. If you blow out your hook and bobbin assembly and a drop of oil, you will not have a problem, it depends on fabric, batting and thread as to how much you need to do it.

Here is my average routine, using just Thursday and Friday for an example. Turned on lights, blew out hook assembly, as well as needle bar, around throat of machine and wheels, put drop of oil in bobbin basket, checked wicks (I really don't have to oil them often, just once in a while, quick check, 3 seconds). Walk around machine turn everything on, load backing, cut batting, load top, choose top thread, walk around back put on thread, go around front, pick bobbin thread, blw out bobbin case, put in bobbin, load in machine, set stitch length, double check all channel locks are off. Set quilt path, tack down top edge and sides, have quilt path stitch, end of row, if I know it uses a lot of thread or put in a used bobbin, check bobbin for thread, roll quilt, repeat, when I change bobbin if there is lint I blast it with the air compressor and load the next. Less than 3 minutes at start of day to blow and oil, seconds during the day to blast it with air to remove lint.

I was in assembly line mode, did 5 Minkee Quilts in 2 days, not much time for messing with things. Once you find your and your machines favorite thread combinations and get a routine going, it takes no time at all. My machine gets heavy use is only has issues I created normally, sound like you will have a lot lighter use than me. So short of jamming a needle and having to retime, everything once you figure your new baby out will be golden. I will comment that sometimes a change in our humidity Affects some of the threads I use. Since I was doing Minkee top and back with cotton batting, I had lots of lint and blew her out more often and oiled every other bobbin. Don't normally have to do that much.

Everyone is going to fight tension at some point. I will say I fight with my dsm more than my Millie. When you get frustrated just walk away, get on the forum and go back to it. We will all be here to help you.

Shirley

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Peggy, I never use compressed air in the bobbin area of my DSM, and this rule probably applies to embroidery machines also. There is a lot going on in the area that houses the bobbin, and in newer models that are self oiling, opening them up to clean is discouraged. (I used to have an old singer that I regularly took apart and cleaned and oiled, loved that!)

Your Longarm, on the other hand, has no feed dogs, and the only other thing in the bobbin area is the gear box (at least on APQS) which is sealed tight. So compressed air is a great tool. Right now I just use canned air from Costco, but a little compressor is on my list!


Cathy Hamilton - M&M'ed 2008 Millennium - Part-time Quilter, Full-time Lover of Quilts

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Jess,  I have George, Lucey's sibling.  I haven't gotten into the best habit of always cleaning after every bobbin change, but do check things over when I am going to begin a quilting session.  I haven't been able to be a daily quilter so that will be different for each person.

 

As to using Aurifil, I have been using that the piecing and most all regular sewing unless it is the wrong color.  Did you know that Aurifil has a heavier thread?  I have used the green spools on George, as well as Invisifil 100 wt.  So try the threads out that you have and see how they perform for you.  The tension is  really not the bad to adjust.  I still haven't changed the bobbin tension much on George and have run the 100 wt Invisifil to King Tut on him.  Just keep breathing and take it easy.  Things will come together for you.

 

Remember to come here at any hour with a concern and most likely you will have someone respond in a very short time.  Even on the weekends and holidays. It is a great place to come.


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Jess, congratulations!

 

I consider myself still a newbie as I'm currently quilting only my 3rd quilt on my 2011 APQS Millie.  (I'll post it when I'm finished.)   I love my Millie and am so excited to finally have time to spend with her!   

 

My Milie is my 3rd commercial sewing machine.  The others are a blind hemmer and a serger.  Commercial machines are built to run 24/7, with minimal maintenance, 5-10 minutes a day. Because they run fast, oil in the right spots is necessary as it prevents metal to metal wear.   As an accomplished quilter, you will likely find adjusting the tension relatively easy.  The concepts are the same as you applied using different threads on your Viking.  I use two bobbin cases, one for pre-wound bobbins with a small magnet in then to reduce overspin, (Magna-glide), and one for bobbins I wind.  

 

Dawn, and the APQS team have created some great tutorials and articles, and there is always this Forum.  Forget about worrying and piece as many tops as you can before your Lucy arrives as you will be wanting to spend some quality time with her soon.

 

Enjoy!


Heidi Patterson

APQS Blissed Millennium with Quilt Path

APQS Sales Rep - Educator - Authorized Service Rep

Boise, Idaho

208-861-5018 (cell)

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Great question and answers!

Anyone got a picture of the attachment you use on your compressor hose to blow out the bobbin case. I have a decent size compressor in the area where Millie lives...but currently only use it to fill tires, more function from the compressor would be great!


Dave

2013 Millie

 

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Dave

Go to Harbor Freight dot com and under air tools you will find a pistol grip blow gun for about $3.  They are available everywhere that sell air compressors.  image_14005.jpg

 

Nigel


Brenda Wells - Green Millie. Sold November 2017
Nigel Wells - Ultimate 1 with |Intellistitch & IQ

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These are awesome answers, guys!  thank you.  Part of why I got an APQS was that this kind of support is out there. :)

 

I guess it's mostly a matter of getting in the habit of cleaning things out.  I will get an air compressor.  And it's looking like I'll need a different bobbin winder too.

 

I know there are different weights of Aurifil, but I do like the thinner since I usually don't want the quilting to stand out as much.  I'm a piecer at heart and that's what I want to be the most prominent.

 

I assume I'm going to get maintenance instructions with my machine, right?  Like on the DVD or in the manual.  Or will I need to be looking here, on the main APQS site and on you tube?  

 

Can't wait to get started!

 

Jess

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My hubby has a big air compressor in the shop. Didn't want the noise in the house, so if you already have an air compressor in the garage, go the the auto parts store and get a bottle to fill tires, then hardware store for a coiled hide, a few fittings and the spray nozzle, I went with the quick connect system. I fill my bottle about every other day of heavy quilting unless doing minkee then it's more. So if you already have easy access to a compressor no need to buy one. We have also taken it to the hillclimbs to fill motorcycle tires and I use it on my car when cleaning and airing tires also. With the quick connect I can easily change to what I need.

A lot of people already have a compressor and this way you don't have the noise in the house if your midnight quilting like I sometimes do when I can't sleep,

Shirley

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I am wondering, tho, about the compressed air. When I bought my  12 needle embroidery machine, they told me to NOT use compressed air to blow out the bobbin area, as this can force lint and dust INTO the machine. So I just use a brush to clean it out, or vacume it. I have noticed on this forum that several people have mentioned using an air compressor on this area, so just wondering about this issue.

 

 

Dear Petmomful,

 

Every brand of machine is different. Follow your manufacturer's recommendations for maintenance. DSMs and Embroidery machines are not the same thing as the industrial strength built longarm machines, such as with APQS machines.

 

Using an air compressor is completely safe with APQS because bobbin areas are completely sealed closed so the fuzz and other stuff cannot get into the workings of the machine. Manufactuers of APQS say that it is OK to use an air compressor to get out the fuzz.  I have used an air compressor for years on my APQS. No problems whatsoever.

 

Shana


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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Dave

Go to Harbor Freight dot com and under air tools you will find a pistol grip blow gun for about $3.  They are available everywhere that sell air compressors.  image_14005.jpg

 

Nigel

Thanks Nigel,

I will pick one of those up...there is a Harbor Freight right near me!


Dave

2013 Millie

 

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Peggy

It is right in my owner's maintenance manual.  Brush lint from hook and hook area (or use compressed air)  and further down Use compressed air to blow out any excess WD40.

 

Nigel


Brenda Wells - Green Millie. Sold November 2017
Nigel Wells - Ultimate 1 with |Intellistitch & IQ

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Jess,   I got a Lucey in Febuary and got off to slow start (more related to lots of snow just after getting my lessons and then summer yard work)...but I am picking up speed now...I just got done with my fourth quilt after two practice muslin quilts.  I have been playing with the tensions and now have used bottom line and OMNI in the bobbin and mainly OMNI in the needle...I also used so fine and tried Aurifil..the Aurifil broke on me...but I am not giving up on it...but I am stitcking to the OMNI for a bit longer ...it stiches pretty good in my Lucey and I figure I got enough to figure out and get used too before using the Aurfil, King Tut, and YLI cotton threads I have...I did follow the advice of several folks and this forum and got some extra bobbin cases and I have adjusted two of them so one is set approximately right for a botton line in the bobbin and OMNI as the top thread,  and one for when I am using OMNI in both the bobbin and as a top thread.  I agree, cleaning out the bobbin is a pain...but I really have found that it helps!  The tension adjustments you make on longarm...are differant then those on the DSM...you turn the top thread tension dial a lot more...my teacher had me take a permanent marker and place a dot on one place on the top tension dial to use a reference point when turning the know so you know how far you turn it at a time...it doesn't really matter where you place the dot...it just helps.  I have gotten a small air compressor to use for cleaning and hope to get it positioned for use soon...my space is small and I only have one duplex outlet (YIKES).  but I will plug it into a spurge protector so I don't have unplug everything all the time.  In the mean time, I have been using the little plastic hand pump I got with my exercise ball...and yes, it is expercise to blow out the bobbin area with the hand pump  :)  oh...and I have two vikings as sit down machines and although, you don't need to oil them like Lucey, they really should be serviced periodically as there are parts inside that the tech will lubricate when he takes the cover off and if you let it go to long, I have been told the machines will eventually dry out...I had to take my embroidery arm in and what was wrong was that the arm had never been lubricated after I bought it...worked great after....I don't take mine Vikings in every year...but rather every few years as they are not used constantly...but they also should be run  periodically too rather then let them sit for a year or so...so I rotate my uses of my DSM....and also try and remember to run my serger at least every few months...I really have too many machines...but I can't decide to part with any of them.....keep us posted on how things are going....I haven't had to do anything scarey like retiming yet...but I will give it whirl if I need too....Lin

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I just wanted to give my two cents and as a not so newbie anymore in the beginning getting the tension was the biggest frustration for me. I switched all my threads over to Glide by Fil-Tec and use the pre wound bobbins they offer in a multitude of colors. I am FAR less frustrated and rarely have to adjust tension anymore. It would be worth ordering the small spool thread pack and giving them a whirl. I was winding my own bobbins and using whatever thread I had. I spent soooooo much time on getting the tension adjusted it took the fun out of what I was doing. Each machine is uniquely different but I was so relieved when I found a thread combo that works. I also suggest, on the rare occasions that I do need to wind my own bobbins that you have an extra bobbin case on hand, I do have to make adjustments between pre wound and metal bobbins. I don't own a tension gauge but have figured out that I have to really tighten down the tension on the winder when I am winding my own, otherwise it just kind of spins off the bobbin. There will definitely be a learning curve and don't be afraid to try different things! This forum has been monumental to my success with my computerized Millie. Never hesitate to search the forum or just post a question, I've never been let down! 

 

Jenn

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Just to let anyone know out there who may have a baby lock Tiara like I do, I asked baby lock on Facebook if it is safe to use an air compressor on the bobbin area, because I was thinking it may not be considered "industrial" like your APQS machines, and they said yes, it is safe to do so.  Glad I learned this tip here on this forum.


Peggy

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Hello!!!!

 

From one newbie to another - it is nice to know we are in this together!!

 

My Millenium arrived on Halloween and due to time constraints we waited a week before setup.  I got it threaded this evening and finally got it running! Whew!!

 

Tomorrow I need to sew channels into my leaders for the doweling so I can use the leader grips.  I was disappointed that my leaders did not come with channels for the doweling to slip into.  Have you done this?  Are you going to do this?  When I say I'm a newbie - I mean it in the truest sense of the word!!!  I'm very, very green!!!

 

I thought sewing the channels for the doweling would be fairly simply with the Millenium because it has channel locks - but my side to side channel lock does not seem to be working :(  The up and down channel lock works great!  I can hear it click whenever I engage or disengage the up and down channel lock and the light comes on the control panel as well but when I engage the side to side channel lock the light does come on but it does not engage/disengage and clearly does not work.  I'm not too sure what to do about this.  Any advice out there?

 

Also, is there a service manual that tells us how to maintain our machines?  I did not get one with my machine. I am wondering also about the air compressor. I will certainly start out with a can of air, but I sure am wondering what type of compressor to get?  What type do you all have?  How big are these things?  

 

I sure appreciate all of your help and support :)  I look forward to a great relationship with my Millie and with all of you!  I've got so much to learn!!!

 

Thanks so much!

 

Coral


Coral 

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Welcome.  I got a new to me Lucey last Feb and am slowly getting to know her.  I have quilt #5 on her and quilt #6 almost ready to go.  I have the red leaders but have not put them on yet  (blushing)  well hopefully soon.  There are some good videos out on you tube to show how.  I printed my manual out for Lucey.  I think there was a CD that came with her that had the manual on it.  You can also order a print copy of the manual from APQS.  and there are a lot of helpful videos on the website.   As mine was a used one, I did get part of the printed manual with her.  My guess on the channel lock would be that the mechanical part is out of adjustment or a wire connection is loose so check that.  Lucey just has one manual channel lock so others folks I am sure will chime in and don't forget you can always call APQS, they are good at helping folks trouble shoot.  Have fun!  I am still a bit intimidated by Lucey...but it is getting better!  I had a little nine inch neck wanna-be before and I find I sort of get lost in all the space to quilt I have with Lucey....but I am loving it.  Lin

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Thanks sewingpup!  A few things since my post last night.....I chatted with Mr. Fixit (my husband) at lunch today about the channel lock trouble I was having, and he said "well - let's go have a look."  It turns out that during set up we had not connected the cable for the side to side channel lock.....just like you said!!  We did that and immediately the channel locked started working!  However, it was certainly not as tight as the up and down channel lock.  I called tech support and they shared a tip with me about adding a small metal washer underneath the encoder to help tighten things up.  Yay tech support!!!  

 

While tech support had me on hold there on my desk sat the 2 cds that came with my Millie and low and behold....there were the manuals and maintenance guide that I had been asking about.....just like you said!!  I am usually better organized than I probably sound!!  

 

I too am quite intimidated by Millie - maybe not so much by Millie herself - but by the jackpots I know I'm going to get myself into!  My dealer is 2.5 hours away, and I always feel better quilting there because whenever I get into a jackpot there is always someone there to help me out!!  Love Bradie and Matt at Sparrow Studioz in Edmonton, Alberta!!  

 

Love the nine inch neck wanna-be comment!!  I am so glad you are loving Lucey <3


Coral 

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Coral

For a compressor something like this will work just fine. http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mastercraft-2-gallon-air-compressor-with-accessories-0587000p.html#.UpUosNKmiSo  They go on sale several times a year for about half price.  I used to have one like this and I can tell you it is quite noisy but it will do the job if you are just using it for blowing out your machine.  You can find similar at TSC stores and Princess Auto.  Christmas is coming somebody will have a sale in the next few weeks.

 

Nigel


Brenda Wells - Green Millie. Sold November 2017
Nigel Wells - Ultimate 1 with |Intellistitch & IQ

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