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BethDurand

Buying a serger

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My darling brother is going to get my darling sister in law a serger for Christmas.  (And I'll get mine back!)  Both of them keep talking about getting it from a discount chain store, that reviews online give them good ratings.  I keep telling them to get one through a reputable sewing store, that they are going to get what they pay for by buying from a discount store.  Even put it into "bike language" hoping that would him to understand, but he doesn't seem to get it.  Could you please offer me some suggestions that would point them into the right direction?  I have tried that she will have more support and the opportunity for lessons buying from a sewing machine store, but he counters that she won't take classes, no time.  I have a White serger that I bought about 20 years ago and it runs great.  I can't imagine the discount store one lasting more than a year, if that.  How do I convince them?

 

 


Beth Durand

Elizabeth Originals Custom Quilting

www.eocquilting.com

beth@eocquilting.com

2006 APQS Millenium

Authorized APQS Dealer

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I had a store owner tell me that the specs for the models sold at department stores does not measure up to the specs for the models sold at machine stores.  She will want to have it serviced sometimes and the machine store will be more likely to have parts and knowledge on those that they sell over the off brands

 

Maybe it will work to refer to buying a Yamaha cycle and expect it to work and last as long as a Harley!  I hope he can hear you.


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I have a basic serger that I have had for over 20 years. Yes, it works just fine but it very basic. I plan to purchase a new one this year. I am looking at the air threading system. I know this is probably the last serger that I will buy. I could get by with my old one though. I guess it depends on how much money he wants to spend and what she plans to do with it. I would definitely suggest that they thread it and also try it out before buying. It's true you get what you pay for but sometimes you don't need top of the line either. I have also found out that sometimes I prefer to buy older technology from someone who didn't use it that much than a brand new item of lesser quality. I would suggest looking at what is out there and trying them out so they know what they are getting. Also consider buying used if they find the right deal.

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Our local Brother store has one that makes THE MOST beautiful rolled hems!!!! It is approx. $350. If I were buying one tonight I'd get that one. The trick to getting good equipment is having someone who will work on them for you. Would that help?


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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I had a store owner tell me that the specs for the models sold at department stores does not measure up to the specs for the models sold at machine stores.  She will want to have it serviced sometimes and the machine store will be more likely to have parts and knowledge on those that they sell over the off brands

 

Maybe it will work to refer to buying a Yamaha cycle and expect it to work and last as long as a Harley!  I hope he can hear you.

Wrong kind of bike Madelyn.  We are talking about the ones you have to pedal yourself.  Then I ran into him at the bike shop!


Beth Durand

Elizabeth Originals Custom Quilting

www.eocquilting.com

beth@eocquilting.com

2006 APQS Millenium

Authorized APQS Dealer

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I would suggest they look on eBay.  I purchased my Babylock Imagine on there and it was hardly used.  Got it for a really good price and have been using it steady for the last 9 years without any problems at all.  There are a lot of great machines on eBay, some brand new...at a fraction of what it might cost at a sewing center or even the discount stores.  Also, they can get the 'brand' name machines that can be serviced by any store that does that brand.


Laura

my.doterra.com/naturespoweroils

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I have an old Viking.  I think Marilyn and I bought them in 1995 when we got our DSM vikings.

 

It has some issues, and I didn't find a dealer anywhere around here, so bought an inexpensive

Singer.  It stitches ok, just not nearly as pretty as the stitching I got from the Viking.

 

I now know where there is a dealer to take it and have adjusted, and the singer will go bye bye.

 

After the repairs, I need  to take the Designer 1 USB up to have it looked at.  The light keeps going

off and will only turn on when I smack it.  The display window does the same, comes up blank,

and a smack turns it on, also. lol,, I LOVE Viking/Husqvarna machnies and they often do last a life time. 

They are still reselling the old 301, from the 70's.  Some are bought because of age, but many buy

to use for piecing.  They are trojans. 

 

Rita

Edited by RitaR

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Lots of times, sewing machine stores take trade-ins and offer great prices on the used ones. One store near me does this and there are a group of women that take classes there who always have to have the newest, greatest machines.  They trade in last year's models for this year's models!  Some barely have any hours on them and are like new.  May be worth checking out the stores nearby.  Let them know what you're looking for and leave your number.  Having good equipment that's trouble free is worth paying a little more.  It doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg to be good.


Merry Jo

Merry Jo Rembold, Julian, CA

APQS Sales Representative

Millie & Quilt Path

Facebook: Creative Quilting by Merry Jo

Merryjorembold.com

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The first time they have to have the cutting blade replaced because she hit a pin with it, they will understand the need to have a local dealer (even the most careful sewer has accidents). That dealer may or may not be able to get parts for a discount store machine. A serger is like any other piece of equipment with moving parts. There is eventually going to be wear and tear, and parts that need to be replace. Some on a surprisingly regular basis. Having a dealer means being able to have that maintenance done without shipping off the machine to some unkown service center where goodness only knows what is happening to that machine, or when it will be received back. I've heard all sorts of horror stories of folks who have sent off their machine to a "service center" for maintenance and repairs. (One of the reasons I love APQS, no horror stories!)

 

Please feel free to use any and all of the above as arguments in favor of purchasing from a local dealer!


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2008 Millennium

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Beth, you explained it as well as I could, but I would only add that; if they do buy an discounted machine even if it does say Brother for example, the Brother dealers very well will not work on it.  The surgers from WalMart or some other discount stores are not quality machines and if it wasn't sold by a dealer, not all dealers will bother to work on them.  Nor more importantly can they get parts for them....

 

Agree with statement above I would buy any of the Babylocks....


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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The so called "name brands" at the discount stores are not equal to the "name brand". Often, the "name brand" has sold the right to put their name on the discount machine. Look too see if the same model is available at a reputable dealer. I would say more often than not they will not be. I am a former sewing machine dealer and often there are not parts available for the discount machines. They are "throw away" machines. When they break down, you throw them away and buy another. They include the name and address of the service center that can be used for repairs; meaning you send them away for warranty work. You are far better off buying a used name brand machine from a reputable dealer than a new discount machine.  I can tell you the discount machines were often our best advertising because the machines were such poor quality and gave the owner nothing but problems that they came in and bought a name brand. (Especially after taking classes with students using quality machines.) Another note: your machine is only as good as the dealer standing behind it; most name brands are excellent; find a dealer who is excellent and will support you and you most likely will be happy.


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APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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I also have a Babylock Imagine.  I didn't have time to take the classes when I bought it, but nowadays, they come with a DVD that shows you everything - from how to thread it (a breeze with that little whooshing threader Babylock has), to doing rolled hems, etc.  I love that little bugger and, when I've been away from it too long to remember what the heck I'm doing, I just pop the DVD in and watch the necessary parts all over again.  I'll bet the discount store model doesn't come with a DVD.

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Tell them,

 

DON'T CHEAP OUT. 

 

Cheap tools will always bite you on the ;)

 

This is one of those instances where the $$ spent up front for having a dealer to consult and a quality machine will save them headaches in the long run.  

 

Dittos on buying better quality, used, than cheap quality, new. 

 

Dh and I have just been having this conversation about a tool he wants.  Top of the line is what his 'guru' suggested, but, yes, there is a less $$ alternative.  I asked, "You know the answer. Get the good ones, you'll never regret it."  We have remodeled two houses, and we have learned, pretty  much the hard way, that cheap isn't always the way to go. It always seems to cost more in the long run, if not in the expense of replacing the tools, certainly in the frustration level. 

 

That said, I have three sergers in the sewing room as we speak:  

 

The first, dh bought as a surprise for me when we first got married.  (16 yrs) A basic model Bernina, it is a real work horse. I've never had any issues with this machine. Dealer in town, came with classes, which were really helpful, I learned a lot. No bells and whistles, does have differential feed, no air threading, but I learned how to thread it just fine. This machine will run til the cows come home. I do a lot of jeans on it...I always have to take things in use the serger to finish the edges. Just basic service, and haven't so much as had to replace the blades. 

 

The second is a Bernina Fun Lock that I just found recently at one of the second-hand stores in town...talk about being in the the right place at the right time.  I threaded it and it sews just fine. I've used it for some simple projects just to test it out, and haven't had any trouble with it.  I am debating keeping this one, because so many people I know are looking for one, but, there's also the convenience of having a serger for dark thread and one for light thread.  No re-threading for a quick project. 

 

The third is a Simplicity Easy Lock. It was a yard-sale bargain. Again, an instance of being in the right place at the right time.  It's not a bad little machine, and would probably do everything a beginner would want, but in a side by side comparison, it is very easy to hear the difference in quality between the machines....The motor on the Bernina just sounds more powerful and runs smoother, where the Simplicity one doesn't 'sound' as powerful and makes a lot more sewing noise.  It clatters a lot, noisy little beastie.  (Wish I could make a video for you, but I don't have the 'right tool for the job!' lol) It would probably do a decent job for most projects, but It doesn't have any adjustments, etc.  It is what it is, where the Bernina has stitch adjustments and the differential feed. This machine may be re-homed soon.  I was using it as my other light/dark thread machine. 

 

The other issue I have with their argument is, WHO is posting the reviews? Is it someone that's been sewing for 40 years, or is it a newbie that doesn't have any room for comparison, took the thing out of the box and is simply happy it works?  another question is, if it's a brand that does have a dealer nearby?  One can still pay for service. 

 

And, last but not least, my story with my brand new serger... my huge dog knocked a full glass of iced-tea over with his tail, all over the serger!  Who ya gonna call?  The dealer's ph # is in the phone book, called them at home, First he told me not to panic, then how to clean/dry out the machine, and then said they'd look at it the next day if I could bring it in. Ya just don't get that kind of service on the internet!  

 

Hope this helps.  

sammi

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Please pay attention to these people. I have advised so many friends and even given proof. they all nod in agreement then go out and buy some cheap model. You get what you pay for. some cheap models are great for a while, but then what.

 

Ginny with espensive expereince.


Virginia Snowden

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Even the most reputable dealer will admit that nothing compares to the Baby lock with automatic tension and threading. They come from a commercial background and are second to none. I just traded my Evolve for a new Ovation and could not be happier. That said, the whole line is amazing and last forever.

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I just found out my dealer will be asking $1695 for my preowned Babylock Evolve.  I can vouch for it as needing nothing and in excellent condition. In fact, it is still at my house because I haven't had time to deliver it to him.  How's that for a nice dealer? I can send it from here I would think.  E-mail me at jim.wyatt9094@gmail.com or 2guyzquilting@gmail,com.

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