dawnpdx

Quilting over a 70's quilt.

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Hi,  I need some advise.  I have a 1970's quilt that I'm leaving in tact (pillow-case construction), removed the ties, fixed tears and holes, and will use in the quilt top position on my Milli.  I'm adding in a new cotton backing with a Hobbs 80-20 batting between.  The med loft old polyester batting is in tact.  My customer wants her old quilt to have a new look, more warmth (doesn't like wool batting), is not interested in doing ANY handwork, and has a limited budget.  This seems like the best option.  Has anyone done a project similar to this, and please, any pointers?  This will be quite a learning experience.  :)  Thanks.

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Dawn Graf-Thiessen

Artistry In Quilts  

A Modern Long-arm and Fiber Arts Studio

www.artistryinquilts.com

artistryinquilts@gmail.com

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Please reassure me that you're not going to try to quilt it without taking it apart? No way will you be successful if you leave the "envelope" intact. The fabric obviously isn't flat from seeing the photo, so as you quilt it will bunch up, pleat, and be not attractive.

 

If she had deep pockets I would take it completely apart and only use the top, discarding the backer and the batting. Repair what needs to be and see how flat it is.

 

On a skimpy budget, I would charge her cost of materials (new batting and backer), stitch a stipple in the background and CC's in the diamonds. It'll need to have binding made and applied. 

 

On a plump budget, feathered wreaths (or leafy wreaths) in the background squares and partial wreaths in the triangles, with a filler surrounding. And again CC's in the diamonds.

 

I'd charge $50 to take apart the layers (2 hours @ $25 per) and a kind/generous 2 cents an inch for the stitching with the skimpy budget.

 

Plump budget plan would be 4 cents an inch.

 

Binding for either--$25 for making the binding, $20 to apply on the frame, and another $2 a running foot for hand stitching the binding to the back.

 

So in spite of her limited budget, you'll need to be paid for the work you do. If she wants to take it apart herself, that will help her final cost. 

 

Pardon my yelling, but if you are new, step away from this project. Not because of inexperience, but because when we are newbies we want to build a customer base and also please everyone. Neither of you may be happy with the outcome and if she isn't willing or able to pay a normal rate for the work, don't take the job. It makes my head hurt to think of all the things that could go wrong--and make you frustrated and ruin a budding reputation. Plus the bad taste left in your mouth when you figure your hourly pay after you struggle with this project. There--I said it! :wacko: One way you can gracefully extricate yourself (if you want to) is to figure a realistic estimate. I bet she won't be able to afford it and you may be off the hook....


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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Excuse me saying so, but that is a real mess.  It needs the setting squares resized to fit the star.  If she wanted to leave the star intact I might suggest removing the star from the setting squares and appliquing the star itself onto a large square of fabric.  I would not do that job, and I desperately need some customers.

 

Sometimes the best thing to do is say no. 


8259635bf834a637a7febcce54170daf.png Sweet T's Custom Quilting Finley, TN  (731)-445-6411 sweet_t_quilting@yahoo.com

 

http://sweettsquilting.blogspot.com

https://www.facebook.com/SweetTsQuilting

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I agree.

Don't do it.

I did this for a quilt my MIL made in the 80s.

It was pretty full, but nothing like this.

I had to cut a lot of the borders off to square it up a bit.

And it was still very wonky.

It took me a ENTIRE DAY just to untie it and remove the old batt and backing.

That old batting attaches itself to the back of the quilt and its a PITA to get off.

And it was a messy job.

I did it cause it was family.

I'd never do it again...even for family.


Meg

"Do small things with great love." Mother Teresa

"Life's too short to fuss with thread." Meg Fazio

http://theonewiththreadsonherclothes.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/megfazio

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I recently tried this for a person who just wouldn't hear of removing the backing and batting of a family member made quilt no matter my suggestion.. Wanted the same thing done for same reasons. I told her I would load it on the frame and give it one try but that I was pretty sure my hopping foot wouldn't hop high enough to move along smoothly. I hoped it wouldn't. It did with a lot of coaxing, but the small area I practiced on was like a dense hotpad with the original backing sandwiched in between. She agreed it wasn't what she wanted, thank goodness! She wanted a quilt, not a mat. I was never so relieved to have a remake not work!


A865FFE96B99D13D2E3C09AF2B8376EA.png
2009 Freedom, and a 1989 Ulti I w/Intellistitch

 

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:blink: Oh Boy.... I would run from this project!  Don't do it.  OR... ask the owner to take it all apart and redo the top so there is no fullness left.  If she is not willing to do that, tell her you just can not quilt this as it is because of all the issues that others here have listed.  There was a reason why this quilt was tied!!


Laura

my.doterra.com/naturespoweroils

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I am new to this forum but not new to quilting. This project is something I would not tackle myself. I have done a few minor repairs on tops but it isn't easy. Unless you have a lot of time and patience to spare. What I am having trouble with is trying to comprehend mitered corners on borders...argh!

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Good advise from everyone!  Run!  I think she should leave it as is.  If she wants another quilt with a new look, tell her to buy Eleanor Burns "Radiant Star" book and get busy!  It would probably take longer to take this one apart and fix it so it can be quilted than make a new one!  In fact, I have a custom quilted Star quilt already done that I will sell her for $375.  New quilt, very nice, and I can send pics!  SERIOUSLY!  It would cost her more than that to have it taken apart, fixed, quilted and bound.  And more than that to buy fabrics, make a new one and have it quilted and bound! :huh:


Merry Jo

Merry Jo Rembold, Julian, CA

APQS Sales Representative

Millie & Quilt Path

Facebook: Creative Quilting by Merry Jo

Merryjorembold.com

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I always enjoy a challenge.  Have only had 2 jobs I walked away from, and could have eventually received a nice payment from one gal who brought me a Lone Star of the semisheer cotton fabrics of little girl dresses back in the 40's and 50's.  Then it had a 2" border, or what should have been a 2", and more diamonds sewn to make the top complete, where the squares and triangles of background fabric would be.  Hand sewn, no 2 seams the same width, none sewn with same width the full length of the seam. Just the initial star would have needed seam work aligned throughout so it would come close to laying flat.  I took it back and laughed telling her of some of the problems, and she made a comment that when she bought it she threw money away.  I laughed too and told her, hang onto it, when you are no longer able to travel, you can take it apart and sew it properly on a machine, and to use a stabilizer to strengthen it and to help hide the seams from the quilt top.   She decided she was going to donate it.  Power to her. 

 

The other quilt is one I bought from a sidewalk vendor in P aducah and with it the seams were so bad once I looked at them, that I threw it out.  One seam allowance would be 1" and the part sewn to it, was sewn right off the fabric, and not enough in that piece to straighten and make it work.

 

It was a color I don't like, a dusty raspberry/maroon, ( NO dusty colors for me) and nearly tan background and nothing for an accent or to highlight the pattern/top.  It was almost monotone and depressing.

 

The fabric wasn't the same quality as in the borders,, one barely muslin weight/weave, the other QS quality.  We thought, discussed and pitched.  Wasn't even worth the time to take it apart and save some of the material.  I'd have had to find another pattern that didn't need the pieces cut way to small.

 

Yup, it was junk and I thought he took it to the dump, he said it went in the burn barrel.    In any case, I blew the $35.00

 

Would I reject again,  yes,,, but it would also depend..   if I'm in the hospital with nothing to do, yes, I'd try to help fix a quilt, not just a Lone Star and frog it.. it would at least give me something to do.  I'm not one to just lay in a hospital bed.. can't stand it.  it would also depend on the sze of the pieces.. 1" finished.  we can just forget that one.  1/2" strip of fabric,  sashing or border a block, forget that too.  Also I've been known to take something along on an overnighter, to frog and be ready to correct when I got home. 

 

There are limits and ROFL, I think I used up my limit of time and space a couple times over today.

 

Have a good Day,

God Bless

 

 

 

Sew Love into Every Stitch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

so I think I'd quote her a price to remove the star, for fabric to attach the star to, the batting, backing, thread charge, quilting charge and of course charge for reassembling the quilt.    If she wants it, do it, if not, give it back.

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Well I'd stretch it really tight and then just do a stipple or some other open pattern all over. That way the fullness can be eased in.  This isn't going to be a beautiful heirloom. If she just wants to use it, go simple. If she's expecting a beauty, then refuse the job - too much work. I do think it would be better to remove the existing backing and batting.


Helen Baczynski
powerquilting.com
I/S and iQ support

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So Dawn,

What are you going to do?  Surely feel for you in this situation, but you've got some great advice.  See you Wed.


Beth Durand

Elizabeth Originals Custom Quilting

www.eocquilting.com

beth@eocquilting.com

2006 APQS Millenium

Authorized APQS Dealer

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Thank you ALL for all your comments and advise.  What a great group.  I was so nervous to start this project I kept myself away from the studio all day yesterday.... and that was before reading your posts.   :)  Ha.  Well, being a newbie (only 18 quilts under my belt) I think I'll approach with naive confidence and channel all of you (and my Grandma's) into the project..... I'll know more today as I start to work on it.  I spoke with the client yesterday and she wants new life breathed into this quilt to give to her daughter.  I'll let you know what I do....    

 

Thanks again. 


Dawn Graf-Thiessen

Artistry In Quilts  

A Modern Long-arm and Fiber Arts Studio

www.artistryinquilts.com

artistryinquilts@gmail.com

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