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Handicap accessibility?


Journi60
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Just a quick question. I am wheelchair bound, and have already made modifications for cutting, pressing, sewing, etc. my question is are the machines adjustable (and feasibly so) modifiable to be used from a wheelchair. Our local shop who rents their machine states no. I was hoping there might be a way. I was assuring my hubby he could tie me standing to a board if I should have been the lucky Gal and win the offer, LOL, but before investing lots of money, I need to be sure. Thanks much!

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If the machine doesn't have hydraulic lifts but rather the regular legs, I don't see why you couldn't have a welder shorten the height of the legs so that you could have the backing roller just higher than your arm rests of your wheelchair.  You then  would have access to the handles and a view of your quilting surface.  You would need assistance to load the quilt as that would be very difficult to do alone.  But as for quilting itself......  Someone should never say never. You've already modified your other sewing station needs, why not quilting?  I wish you the absolute best and hope beyond hope that you win the Lucey!!!!  Bless you!!

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Several (maybe 7?) years ago a system was demo-ed at one of the big longarm shows which allowed one to sit while using a longarm. It consisted of a ramp that elevated a chair, which was on a rail or pulley system and moved back and forth along the frame. I believe it had controls in the arm of the chair. I'll do a search to see if something like that is still available. Anyone else remember seeing it?

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umm...that is a good question...When I had my little nine inch mega quilter on a ten foot frame....I would sit in an office chair and scoot along the quilt to do it as I was having major problems with my foot (much better now)  I stood to load the quilt but probably could have sat....can you transfer to an office chair? or can the wheel chair be modified to go sideways?  I also need to adjust the level on the sides as I quilted but on the APQS machines there is a leveler bar so that isn't needed.  I wouldn't give up on the idea until I checked further...maybe start contacting dealers and seeing if any have customers who have bought machines that are in wheel chairs.  Maybe also check with a physical therapists/occupational therapist to see if they have any thoughts.  Another thought you be to get one of the sit down table machines like George...You maybe could find someone with a frame long arm to just baste your quilts for you if you like to free motion on a sit down machine.  Lin

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Linda

I remember seeing an ad or maybe it was on this forum a few years ago for a chair that moved side to side.  I almost think the chair was something like a saddle stool with a motor.  I've never saw it in person though.

 

Nigel

 

Found the youtube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R02kktyg370 that Sue was talking about below. and a phone number 712-790-9266  I don't know if it is still active.

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Several (maybe 7?) years ago a system was demo-ed at one of the big longarm shows which allowed one to sit while using a longarm. It consisted of a ramp that elevated a chair, which was on a rail or pulley system and moved back and forth along the frame. I believe it had controls in the arm of the chair. I'll do a search to see if something like that is still available. Anyone else remember seeing it?

 

Yes I remember seeing this.  I have it bookmarked as the Sew and Go motorized quilting chair.  Unfortunately when I click on the link the website is no longer active.  I saw it online and I remember it as being two rails that the chair moved along in front of the machine.  I think it showed a Gammill machine but I don't remember if it was anything to do with them.  Perhaps someone knows what happened to Sew and Go.

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Here is a You-tube of the Sew and Go quilting chair.  It looks like a box with an office chair mounted on it that runs on a rail under the front legs of the frame.  They are using a Freedom!  I have a George and that might be a good option for you. I would encourage getting a larger cabinet than the table the sell with George now.  Right now, I am quilting a king-sized labyrinth quilt on mine.

 

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Thank you all for being so generous with you time as to assist with this problem. The video of the Sew & Go chair seems ideal, but is nowhere to be found on the web. I don't know anything about the Martelli product and would be cautious as to venture that amount of money into the unknown. You are all so kind and helpful. Maybe one day.

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Journi,   First, Welcome to the forum.  We always like to meet new members..  and love the picts of your projects.

 

if you are able to sit without the back and side supports of a wheel chair, perhaps you could use a Saddle Stool.  If you do need the support,

perhaps an office chair.  I had the legs on my Lenni shortened and haven't regretted it at all.  I just had to make sure he knew to stay above 9",

so he didn't cut the adjustment bolts off.

 

Also, maybe your hubby could make a platform using heavy plywood and heavy office wheels.  You'd still need a way to get your chair up on it.

 

I just wonder if regular office chair arms could be reshaped to allow you get closer to the machine, for stitching at the back.

 

Praying you find a good solution.

 

Rita

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I really thought I had responded to your many suggestions, but can't locate my response anywhere. Therefore, please forgive me if I repeat myself.

Thank you all for taking the time to help me with this situation. The sew & go chair was the most exciting option I found, thinking it would free my hands, but, alas, I can locate nothing about the product on the internet. I don't think a saddle stool will help much as I need the back support.

Perhaps this will be an opportunity for APQS to enter a new arena in their product development.

Either way, I will table the idea for now and just keep an eye out. It's amazing how limiting quilting is for someone who can't stand. My most challenging area to overcome was accurate cutting, and even purchased an Accuquilt. Although the product was of some assistance, nothing beats eye-balling the material and ruler! I have had to resort quite a bit to precuts because managing anything more than a fat quarter messes me up regularly. I nearly adjust the cuts and modify the patterns (when used) to the premeasured cut material size. I usually have to have someone help ,e with the actual sandwiching of the quilt but from there, just go at it by hand or scrunch through my Bernina.

At that, I must get moving as I still have a quilt to finish before Christmas!

Thanks again for all your suggestions!

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If you are quilting with the scrunch through Bernina method, have you seriously considered George or other sit down models?  George would give  you a 20 inch throat space to scrunch through and you would be sitting in the same position and use the same movements that you do with your Bernina. 

 

I hope you can find a good solution to your quilting needs.

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The Sew and Go was designed by Mike ***** (don't remember the last name), and he worked at APQS at the time. He was showing the system at Quilting the Quilt in Duluth, MN in 2002. This was the year Jim, Bob & Jim took over the company, or at least became part owners. If you call APQS and speak to Mike Moore, he may know if the product is still available, or who you can contact about it. Jim Kaldenburg is an engineer, and radically improved our table when he first came on board with APQS. I think he'd probably have some ideas of how this could be done. It's certainly worth a phone call or two.

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I don't know why you couldn't have the legs cut down by a welding/fabrication shop. It woulld easily be done with a ports and saw. Then install the hydraulic lift so you could easily find a height for you. The only issue I see would be rolling your chair sideways, as my uncles electric chair doesn't move that way. But by doing freehand you could do one section, back out, move over and keep going. The only thing I can't see you doing is panto graphs, but you could do that also by adding a computer system. I think you could even load your quilts, as I unroll the backing take up roller all the way out and it comes to the front bear and I load there with red snappers. So with some modifications I think it is doable, I'm married to a welder and can ask him if you need me too. You are already used to adapting so you have found ways to do what you need to do. I think it is doable. As for George, it would work, but if you have back problems maneuvering a heavy quilt would be a lot more taxing than the machine on rollers. It would use different muscles and you might want to seek out a physical therapist for exercises to strengthen those muscles before you get going.

Hope this helps. APQS machines have the bars higher and you would just have to make sure your legs and chair arms wouldn't hit the carriage, you could figure out what manufacturers frame works best be getting assistance into a raised chair and find the one most comfortable that way, a metal table could be modified for height without many issues.

Shirley

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You may be able to find someone to fabricate this system for you. It looks like it needs a platform with wheels on the back corners and a track of some kind at the front. Plus a chair that works with your limitations and a reversing motor strong enough to pull the loaded platform. A belt or cable could pull the platform. If the platform is built the correct height and is easily accessible to you, you wouldn't need to modify the frame when set at its lowest. I wish you success in finding a way. I'll have my engineer DH look at it and estimate what it might cost.

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I ordered a new to me system summer of 2013.  AS I am rather short, under five feet tall, I asked if the table legs could be shortened three inches so I did not need a platform to stand on.  It took a bit longer to get as the table had to go back to the person who actually makes them, was able to get shorter legs.  Unfortunately they are still a bit too long, but shrter legs can be done!  They didn't even charge me extra!

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Journi   would the arms be able to scoot under the frame?  I'm thinking if not, you would have an

awfully long reach, and be limited at the back of the quilting area.

 

I was messing around with the office chair, and think if the legs were shortened about 6" - 8", it

would make it a lot easier.   We took my table legs to a welder here in town.  He did a beautiful

job and the joints are not noticable at all.  He even spray painted them black for me, which we

did not expect.  He got a nice tip.

 

I think from having been around folks with disabilities my whole life, I keep thinking about this

and the rails the quilting machines run on keep coming to mind.   If someone could come up with

a motor feature to move it sideways, you would be in the works!  If not, you would need to manually

move your chair side to side.   Might be something to think about.    LOL,  I know I can get some

very hairbrained ideas.  lol

 

Rita

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  • 11 months later...

I have a pulled lower back muscle on the right hip and now right knee pain. So I really need a fast solution and have a custom quilt that needs to be done. I have a great ergonomic sewing chair that I just bought at PIQF. I could find a box with carpet on top and maybe design one for myself.

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