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New Pantograph Tool ---- Makes doing pantographs or picture images a breeze!


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Dave Hudson - the Pattern Man - used to sell a tray that fit over the front rails of long arms so you could place a pattern on it and be able to follow the laser light from the front of the machine. I have seen it at several shows - the last time was last January at the Rusty Barns Craft & Sewing Show in Phoenix - but I can't remember the name of it. Is this what you are talking about? I wish I had a picture of it or a link but since I'm computerized I don't pay a lot of attention to these things anymore.

I found this YouTube video of something Dave Jones has/had out. The video shows DeLoa demonstrating how to use the front mounted table over the rails and use the laser light to follow the pattern: 

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The Gammil machine I use to rent at the local QS had a large sq of plexi glass that you center your design on then you placed another plexi glass over top of it.  The top plexi had cross hairs on it so you could center your design and place your laser in the center. After you found the center of your block, adjust your laser with the center of the design and then start quilting.  Both plexi's were heavy and just laid on top of your quilt top (no table).  I was always concerned about vibration moving the design about however, that didn't seem to happen.  I like the table idea much better but I don't have the extra bar to allow it to rest on. It would have to rest on the take up roller and that could be an issue in getting the design straight/square.

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First, Good LUCK, Trinity.

I don't mean to be demeaning any product mentioned here. I'm just a tight wad.

I think the same could be accomplished by duct taping a cookie tray onto

a couple of curtain rods.. cut the rod ends so they still have just enough

ends to curve a bit and not slip off the rods. the panto section could be placed

on the tray and stitch it out then return to the panto after you've stitched

out the section, or moved forward as the pattern progresses.

Himself made me a gadget like that since I sold the QZ and the tray I had went

with it.

Rita

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Rita, I too am not interested in just "gadget hoarding"... Sure, we all can rig up something to do a task, heck, you should see all the work I put into refitting LED lights onto my Millie!!!

But, after 10 years of avoiding doing any sort of pantograph because the resulting " practice curve" was not in my time budget, I can now add this to my customers options without hesitation.

Getting more excited to share with you also!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have not posted for a while and have only just come across this topic.

 

For the first few years of my quilting business, I, too, hated pantographs with a passion! I just couldn't seem to 'get it'. So I concentrated on all-over designs that I could do from the front of the machine. It seemed more natural to me somehow. I also started custom quilting really early on.

 

After a few years, I found there were so many beautiful patterns out there and decided to try again. My first machine was not stitch regulated but by now I had a Millie with stitch regulation and found it a lot easier. Like some of you, I quilt using my right hand on the left handle, but the fingertips of my left hand provide added stabilty and guidance. Keeping a loose hold on the handlebar is important - hold it too tightly and you begin to wobble, but hold it loosely and you quilt smoother lines. 

 

When doing pantos with long flowing lines, I make sure my feet are well apart to keep good balance and work out where are my (brief) resting points. It is usually the junction say, of a leaf and flower, and I know I really only have to concentrate  on that section. I often move my body too - depends on the pattern. After lots of practice, I no longer hate pantographs, but now even like the nature of following the line and get lost in my thoughts!  

 

Having said that, if there was SOMETHING between doing it myself or using a computer, I'd be interested! Just to give my achy hands a rest occasionally!

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  • 4 weeks later...

I took my old plexiglass DSM tabletop extension and it had feet on it. I set it up on the top of the rollers and put my pattern on it for blocks. I taped the pattern down and laid a plexiglass cover over my pattern. That was pretty easy to use from the front with the laser. When not in use that way, I used it like a table and kept clippers and cleaning supplies on it. Loved it.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

So excited, I got to try the prototype this week! Wow, even better than I expected! I was able to easily do a really intricate panto without any stress or need to worry that it looked different than the paper... A few modifications and I will be getting it ready for the debut at HMQS.... Need to make a video as soon as it comes back from the fabricator to show how it works. I will keep you updated.

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