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It works like Sewer's Aid…minimizes fuzz & inconsistencies of the thread so that it spools off the cone better and passes more smoothly through the machine.  Mineral oil (or a similar silicone product) are often used in factory sewing situations.  Not everyone thinks it is a good idea for the machines but I have found it helpful with some temperamental threads.    Nancy in Tucson

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Yes, any  silicone product works wonders for threads that don't want to behave for quilting.  I use it with my longarm and dsm to keep tension issues and thread breakage under control.  Sharon Schamber actually dips her thread cones into Mineral Oil and lets them drip a bit before using.  I haven't gotten to that yet..lol.  I put stripes of oil on the cone.  If the thread still has a little issue, then more oil.  I haven't found it causing any issues with my machine either.  ;) 

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micah,  I've found no spots on the quilt from the mineral oil.  I also dip, as does Quilting Heidi.. I've had no adverse machine

conditions, and it seems to also strengthen some threads.  Not old rotten threads.  Just the newer ones that seem to break more than usual.   I always use it on cotton and cotton/poly threads.. poly, in fact all of them that can cause static in our very dry winters.  With some I still have to use static guard and spray silicone right on the quilt.  I've seen no ill affects from either of those.  I do wear a breathing mask..  everyone should around sprays.

 

Rita

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Thanks Rita,

I think I will give it a go on my next quilt. The last one I did for me, I had issues with the thread not lying down in a straight stitch. Tension was good, but it was a dark thread on a light fabric and stitches appeared almost zig zag. heck, I think I will just load some fabric and try it that way. Not wait for a quilt to be done. I think that the issue was the thread being dark and it was stiffer and rough from the over dyeing to get the dark color. Hoping the mineral oil will eliminate the fuzzes so it lays down straighter.. If it helps, I'll let you know.

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Andrean, there has been a lot of discussion about mineral oil recently.  Sounds very handy, but of course, I haven't tried it yet. :) I do have some thread that could be candidates, just haven't had to use them since learning about this technique.

 

A Sewers Aid discussion from December grew to encompass mineral oil.  You can see it here: http://forum.apqs.com/index.php?/topic/34392-sewers-aid-question/

 

Hope this helps, and welcome to the forum!

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After a workshop with Sharon Schamber, I have tried soaking the whole cone.  She leaves them overnight.  I just dunked for a few minutes, pulled the cone out with a tweezer, blotted with a paper towel and onto the machine.  Again, not required for all threads by any means but on option to try if a thread is being contrary.  Nancy in Tucson

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Adrean.... what i use is an old domestic machine oil bottle...the ones with the long neck on them, put some mineral oil in it and then apply strips of oil along the cone of thread.  I put about 6-8 strips up and down on the thread.  I also put some on a small piece of cotton batting that sits in the neck of the thread guide just above the cone of thread, so that the thread will glide through the batting with the oil on it.  Works great and I have never had any issues with thread problems doing this or having the oil leaving any marks on the quilt.  I have never had issues with my machine using this oil.

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I took a class from Sharon Schamber also.  We dunked the whole cone, blotted and put it on the machine.  I would have bet my life I would have seen oil leaching away from my thread line.  I never saw a hint of oil.  She sure made a believer out of me!  I don't dunk every cone, only the troublesome ones.  We have a lot of static electricity when the wind blows and it helps tame the thread.  Otherwise it spools off too fast and sticks to the machine in the weirdest places.  I think you could put it in a squeeze bottle and use it just like Sewer's Aid.  Just put lines every half inch or so all the way around the cone.

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I'm not sure what type of threads you all use, but I've never, in ten years of longarming, had the need for any sort of mineral oil, sewer's aid, wads of batting, or any other mumbo-jumbo to make my threads behave.  Yes, I've taken lots of classes from Sharon Schamber, but I still don't get what's wrong with a thread that would make you want to do this.

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Linda,

I suspect some of the problem may be climate related. I live in the very humid south, so I don't have the problem with static electricity some of the folks from dryer climates seem to have. I also don't have any trouble with most threads I've tried. I do, however, have one particular cone of cotton thread that just will not sew without breaking every few minutes. I've tried every other trick I can come up with, but for the life of me I can't make that thread work without breaking. I may try this method for that cone. I can't use it anyway, so I don't have anything to lose by trying it.

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