Bonnie in Ok

Machine vs hand quilting value in the future

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I was asked about the value of a quilt depending on whether it is machine or hand quilted. It is not an old quilt but someone is making the tops now and wondering if the value of the quilt will be less in the future because it was machine quilted instead of hand quilted. What do you think?


Bonnie Devenport

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Interesting.  I don't have an answer, but to me it seems almost like asking if a manuscript is more valuable handwritten or typed.  As technology advances have come along, people just expect to see the typed version.  A handwritten copy would be extremely rare. Would that make it more valuable- I guess that depends who you ask.  i think it will be the same way with textiles.  Computerized sewing, embroidery, and quilting machines are the norm now.  Something handstitched is very rare.  Again, I'm not sure if that means more valuable or not.  Just my two cents worth


8259635bf834a637a7febcce54170daf.png Sweet T's Custom Quilting Finley, TN  (731)-445-6411 sweet_t_quilting@yahoo.com

 

http://sweettsquilting.blogspot.com

https://www.facebook.com/SweetTsQuilting

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This would be a good question for an appraiser.  I have had a couple of quilts appraised and I believe amongst all things taken into consideration when determining the value the appraiser looks at the quilt pattern, fabric and the cost, how quilted (machine or hand), if quilting compliments the quilt design, time it takes to piece and quilt.  I believe there are other considerations but I think if all things were equal, rather than say machine quilting detracts from the value it may be more accurate to say hand quilting adds to the value.  I am not an expert, only providing something to think about.


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Carmen in the Ozarks
 

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A very interesting question here. The hand quilting would only add to the value if it was well done hand quilting and complimented the piecing. The same would hold true for machine quilting. The quilt also increases n value if it has been published or won an award or was made by someone who was well known or won awards.


Jennifer Bernard

My quilted jackets are on a competition journey around the country

gathering pretty ribbons (sometimes)!

Quilting with my Millennium and playing with my Quiltazoid!

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I also think the complexity of quilting; whether by hand or machine would make the difference and how well it was executed. A simple quilted top would be of less value than a heavily quilted top whether by hand or machine.


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APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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Whether or not it was done by hand would not affect the pricing, since all materials are new.  What would affect the value would be the quality and artistry of the piece.  Both in piecing and stitching.  There are an awful lot of machine-quilted quilts that appraise for many thousands of dollars.

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Since you were asked about "future value" --who knows? A quilt made today from new fabric, with a contemporary pattern, and hand quilted might be worth less 40 years from now than one that is similar and beautifully machine quilted. Collectors in the future might look at the hand-quilted one from 2014 as an anachronism--something "out of place in it's time". It might be considered with amusement or treasured as something rare. We can't know for sure. If your friend wants to maintain the "value" of the quilt it should be displayed and stored carefully so there's no deterioration of the fabric. And that means you can't really hang it up or use it on a bed.

What fun is that?! ;)

All those extravagantly appliqued, hand-quilted, and lovingly maintained quilts from a hundred years or more ago are being displayed and stored carefully in museums for us to study and view now. And they're still around because they were "too good to use". They were put away in cedar chests and stashed into closets to save them for sometime special. And many times they never saw the light of day. 


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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Another question to ask yourself is are you making this as an heirloom for future value or are you quilting for the fun and joy of it,( not that creating and heirloom isn't fun)? I quilt for the fun and joy of the whole process, to create my own quilt, to not worry about future value...pure fun! Besides there are so many more quilts I want to make that nothing would be finished if I didn't use my LA to help in the process. I would never get a hand quilted quilt done, I know me and the process is too slow for me. 


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Hand quilting?  Are you kidding me?  That is why Elas Howe invented the sewing machine in 1853; I mean, you could sew on a machine even if you didn't have electricity yet!  He too knew sewing by hand was for folks who didn't have anything else to do!!!!!  I've got to get-er-done and move on, people!


Just Sew Simple Sylvia Blissett APQS Freedom '09 "Stitch" Circle Lord 2010 “"Until one has loved an animal, Part of their soul remains unawakened.”

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