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Tips to manage batting on frame

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These are the days that I wish I didn't have that obnoxious quilt top roller on my frame. 

 

I am quilting a king size right now with Quilters Dream 100% cotton.   As I advance the quilt,  of course, you have to adjust the batting and make sure it's smooth.  As I adjust the batting (with a gentle hand) it slightly stretches creating a 'bump' for the next advance in the spot that I held it.  Then I have to  wiggle my hand under that bar and make sure that the batting is smooth out with no lumps.  

 

Anyone have any tips to help me manage the batting?   I find the QD 100% cotton is a little more sensitive to stretch than the Hobbs 80/20.    Since this quilt is so huge, it makes managing the batting a little more difficult.

 

Any tips for me?  aside from groaning, rolling my eyes, and estimating how many more advances I have to endure?   I did a big cheer dance when it finally lifted off the floor. LOL

 

 


Andrea  http://www.urbanquiltworks.com

Motha Stitcha on an apqs millennium

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Well Andrea, this probably won't help you, but what I did to deal with the problem is built a batting access system which allows me to lift the top roller to get at the batting.  With the power advance on the Millies. I think both top and back roller need to be together.  As for the batting on the floor, I built a batting "sling" that keeps it up off the floor, and relatively contained.  Made it from a piece of fabric about 30" wide and 12 ' long.  Have aluminum tubing on one side that drops in a couple of brackets on my frame, and 7 velcro tabs that hold it to the table top.  Jim

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Be sure that when you receive QD batting that it's the mid loft or deeper. Their thinnest Request grade batting is not advisable for longarming. It has no scrim and tears and stretches easily.

Like Jim, I have a "batting trough" under my machine. It's basically an unbleached muslin sling supported by two poles that span the distance between the legs. I float my tops so when I load the batting it gets accordion-folded into the sling. Then the top is positioned and added to the sling. Everything is off the floor and easily loads.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I use a batting sling, but also use a "swim noodle". The end of batting is tucked into a slit cut all the way down the noodle, then rolled and stored in the sling. I roll some off when I advance the quilt. For wide battings, you can use two noodles.

Debbie


Debbie

Jackson, Ga.

 

 

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Andrea:  I like your using the length of the batting as inspiration for your progress.  As long as the pile doesn't discourage you LOL.

 

If you look for a posting I made about a month ago titled something like "Ult2 Table Mods" you be able to look at pics of my table.  You'll see the batting access system. gas struts and all.  If you look carefully You'll be able to see my batting sling too.  It's made with striped fabric threaded on an aluminum pipe.  Jim

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I think I am the lowest tech person here....I just rigged up a queen  sized sheet for a set the bottom had worn out underneath my frame....I simply pinned a waste strip of fabric...(selvage edges)....to each of the four corners making the strips long enough to tie around the legs .....I had to anchor them a bit better to keep the sheet from closing up but as I hadn't bothered to trim my strips much....I had plenty to tie around another part of the frame to keep my "sling" open for the batting....it works just fine....I always pull a few feet out of the sling before I roll the quilt so it moves smoothly.....I know what you mean by getting your arm under the front two bars.....I left a large head pin in the wrong place and it had gotten itself laying between the top and batting in a channel I was quilting....I was able to work it down the channel into an area without quilting...but then had to stick my arm between the two bars to retire it....I was thinking "old wringer washing machine rollers" at the point...it was a struggle...but I made it....of course I thought after I had gotten it out....that I could have just backed the quilt up a bit and I wouldn't have had to stick my arm so far under and pinch it.....Lin

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My batting sling sounds a lot like Jim's. I use a heavy cardboard tube and roll the batting on it and put it i the sling. I've been thinking of getting a long 3 inch diameter pvc pipe for this purpose to add weight to the batting roll as it will help keep it from bunching up.

post-5206-0-07760000-1414193576_thumb.jpg

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My frustration is not the batting that is gently puddled (accordion style) on the floor.   It's more the few little ripples cause by when I am straightening the batting, or when I gently tug on the quilt top (because it is a king and I'm trying to make it all straight and square), and the batting shifts somewhat - so then I have to shift the batting back and it has a gentle ripple/bump from the tug. I have to smooth that bit out and it drives me cray cray!!! 

 

Sheesh, if I put the batting in a hammock,  I would be climbing in there with the batting and taking a nap!!!   :lol:


Andrea  http://www.urbanquiltworks.com

Motha Stitcha on an apqs millennium

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  You may want to use a long ruler or silicone spatular to smooth with rather than pulling.  I use a 5 gallon paint stick from Lowe's Building store.  Also, a small PVC pipe will be smooth enought and heavy enought to push the patting. 

 

I have also attached a picture of my sling on Miss Millie to catch and keep the fabric and batting off the floor.  I used a coded cabling so it doesnt mark the legs. 

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/127344460@N04/14999598743/


Blissful Quilting until next time…

Judith Washburn

BlissQuilter.com

APQS Dealer

Sealy, Texas

832-724-6335

Complete Longarm Quilting Studio

Millennium Blissed with IntelliQuilter

Lucey Blissed with Quilt Path

 

 

 

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My batting sling is very low tech!!!

 

I have a very long wide selvedge edge from fabric pinned to the table leg beside the quilt top bar , stretched to the other end and pinned.  Then I have some plastic bulldog type clips that I clip the batting up off the floor to the selvedge.

 

I make sure with each advance that the sides are out as far as the previous edge.


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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Andrea, have you tried Quilters Dream Blend batting?  That is my favorite as it is very strong and you can tug on it and not warp the batting. I find the Cotton Select very stretchy so only sell it to my hand quilter as it is great for that.


Kathy Schwartz

Tamarack Shack Longarm Quilting

Blog http://tamarackshack.blogspot.com/

Website http://www.tamarackshack.ca/

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If you roll the batting onto a heavy, long tube (batting tube or 2 or 3" PVC pipe) and lay it on the floor in front of the machine, the extra weight of the tube with the batting evenly rolled around it will help keep the batting taut and manageable. I just happen to stick mine in my hammock/sling, but you really don't need to have a sling for that. As you advance the quilt, it really helps (at least on my kind of frame) keep the batting in place and not bunching. I rarely have to adjust batting when I do this with a large quilt ... but it helps to have a long, heavy tube with the batting nicely rolled on it.

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I do something similar to Bonnie to control my Batting I I put a macrame cord through a 1" PVC pipe  then put it in some foam pipe insulation 

Then took the loop side of  Velcro and stuck it on the foam I tie one end securely to the frame around the bolt of the top roller  when I am loading a quilt I untie the right side and bring it up to the top of my sandwich .I lay the end of the batting on top and attach this end to the Velcro and wind the batting tightly on the bar until I have all the excess rolled on this bar. Then I just tie the other end of the Macrame cord to the bolt of the quilt top roller and my batting is out of the way and unrolls without wrinkles I find it is a slick way to keep the batting out of my way I have no problem putting bobbins in and out as the batting is right under the quilt and I have good access to bobbin area. I will try and post a picture but I have a monstrous quilt on my 12' frame it is 125" yikes it is maxed out and not alot of room for pictures maybe i can take pictures if it ever comes off the frame

post-63431-0-64499100-1414283295_thumb.jpg  post-63431-0-41802500-1414283439_thumb.jpg

This is probable clear as mud  :wacko: 


 

Terry

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Ok  I understand about the batting, had a sling with cord to hold it up.  I see where something solid would work much better. My Lenni Table doesn't have the places to hang things so they are apart..  I don't see how I could hang a hammock and have the sides seperate. 

But, how do  you check the backing side of the quilt if you can't lift the batting roll to look?

 

I don't know if I'm making sense..

Also when smoothing out the batting, try smoothing it towards the quilted part, not the loose end side.   Patting it out is best and for me, using mostly W&N,  it seems to cause less distortion..

 

I'm going to check back with Quilts of Valor Org. and see if they still require only cotton batting.  I'm tired of flat quilts.. would like more definition to them.

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Hi Rita,

You are right, you can't really get under the quilt when the batting is hanging down in the sling, unless it is hanging up close to the quilt bar. That's why I use the swim noodle. I can hang my sling just below the bar and with the batting rolled onto the swim noodle and inside the sling, I don't loose a lot of "headroom". I have thought about removing the quilt top bar, since I float my tops and don't use it for anything except hanging the sling on it, but really have no place to store the bar!

Debbie


Debbie

Jackson, Ga.

 

 

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I don't use Quilters Dream batting because of it's tendency to 'peak' when you need to tug on it.  Love, love, love the feel and loft of their batting, but for me, it is just not stable enough.  This is how I manage batting when I roll the quilt.  I advance to where I want to begin stitching again, but I leave the backing purposefully slack.  I don't float my quilts - I use the top roller.  Then I give gentle tugs on the batting to be sure it has no lumps in it, and then I tighten the back.  Everything smooths out wonderfully.  I really wish QD had a better stabilizer in it.  I just can't use it.

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Just a tiny hint for when you accidentally tug a "peak" in the batting. (Or when the batting somehow has a peak or two straight from the package. :unsure:) Lift up the top so you can position the peak within the stitching field. If you can't "pat it out", use sharp scissors to carefully cut an arc in the peak. The curved slit will be "patable" and the batting will again lay flat. You'll have a double laying of batting in a very small area and it will not be noticeable when quilted.

I also avoid un-scrimmed batting. Too much trouble.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I have a Blessed Milli with Quilt Path. I have just made a sling and now wonder how to hang it. I clean my bobbin area almost every pass from left to right. I have an M bobbin. I do not want to crawl under a sling or untie it each time. The main reason for wanting a sling is to keep the batting and top clean. Lint builds up and I blow it out of the bobbin area. It floats around and settles wherever it can. Usually the floor has loose thread snips, and batting puddling, the bottom part of the top, and the lint from bobbins, I keep the floor as clean as possible. But hoped to put it in a sling to keep it clean. I float tops. Never have used my top bar. Have my machine on casters. What do you suggest for attaching my sling so I can get to my bobbin area easily and not hinder Quilt Path?


1F6CA5955DF121CC55971D0D9BDA7E0F.png

APQS Representative for Federal Way, WA

klwheeler@yahoo.com

510-386-4156

www.feathersandloops.com

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This is how I straighten out Quilters Dream Request or Select.  I have several customers who will not use any other batting so I had to find a way straighten those batings.  Like Linda S. I roll the quilt sandwich but leave it a little slack.  Then I gently tug the batting and the top together to keep the batting from "cupping,"    Then I tighten the sandwich.  The top becomes the stabilizer for the batting.  This has saved my sanity and I no longer get those dang cups in the batting.  Hopefully this is the answer you were looking for.

 

These are the days that I wish I didn't have that obnoxious quilt top roller on my frame. 

 

I am quilting a king size right now with Quilters Dream 100% cotton.   As I advance the quilt,  of course, you have to adjust the batting and make sure it's smooth.  As I adjust the batting (with a gentle hand) it slightly stretches creating a 'bump' for the next advance in the spot that I held it.  Then I have to  wiggle my hand under that bar and make sure that the batting is smooth out with no lumps.  

 

Anyone have any tips to help me manage the batting?   I find the QD 100% cotton is a little more sensitive to stretch than the Hobbs 80/20.    Since this quilt is so huge, it makes managing the batting a little more difficult.

 

Any tips for me?  aside from groaning, rolling my eyes, and estimating how many more advances I have to endure?   I did a big cheer dance when it finally lifted off the floor. LOL


FFE992D1FB7A16BDBE9FDE1627DBA781.png ? Chris Landis

2001 APQS Millennium

Quiltizoid

www.facebook.com/pages/Feathercreek Quilting by Chris Landis

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I hear you Andrea! Hate those "wrinkles" of batting. I use two layers of batting very often and wrinkles happen worse with two layers. I have been known to lift back the top, the top batting, straighten the bottom batting, replace the top batting and finally replace the qult too. But there must be an easier way.....


9BD280A625D2D6D2E2166C9DE34879A9.png

Quilting from the Heart

APQS Millenium, Circle Lord equipped, hand guided and lov'n it!!!

http://rosecityquilter.wordpress.com/

http://qfth.ca

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