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I know this topic has been discussed many times but I would like some more discussion please.  I recently had a customer bring me Warm and Natural Batting to use on her quilt and I had never used it before.  I usually use Hobbs 80/20 or wool and that is what most of my customers bring me.  I would like to hear from my valued, informed quilt friends what they feel about Hobbs 80/20 versus Warm and Natural Cotton. I am getting ready to order a new roll of batting and I am wondering about whether I should maybe order the Warm and Natural because it did seem to quilt up nicely and this last roll of Hobbs has been kind of thinish.(is that even a word)

 

Mary

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I think all the batting products seem thinner.  :(

I steer my customers towards Warm&White instead of W& Natural, if they insist on 100% cotton batting.  When placed correctly, the W&N side with the most debris (flecks of dried cotton leaves and stems) will be up against the top. Any white or pale blocks in the piecing are prone to show-through after quilting. Plus, a customer brought me an unquilted top that was 10 years old and had been folded up as a sandwich and left in a closet. The flecks had stained the top, even on colored pieces. It didn't wash out, after she'd paid to have it quilted, bound it, and washed it. What a shame..

 

I keep rolls of W&W, Soft & Bright (100% poly), and wool available to sell. And packages of King size in both a blend and wool, because they're harder to find around here.

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I have used Warm and Natural batting often, and I have always had good results with it.

 

Now I have a question please.....what type of batting would you use for a table cloth?   I am making a fairly formal table cloth.  I will be putting a lot of feathers on it.   I want it to lay flat, so I am thinking I want something thin.....that can be washed and hold it's shape. Oh, and the cloth itself will be a cotton or cotton blend that will be prewashed of course.   What do you think?  I really need help on this.  I am open to all thoughts.

 

 Thank you!

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I have a tablecloth I plan to quilt, and I bought Thermore to use in it. It was recommended to me by another quilter as being nice for tablecloths. I have not tried it yet, however. If you want a cotton batting, you could order Quilter's Dream in the lowest loft. It is, however, kind of stretchy and not really intended for longarm quilting, but I know quilters who use it successfully. One presenter at a guild program said her LA quilter uses it for all of her things so that she can carry more of her quilts to programs she presents. The quilts looked great.

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Linda R.  Have you used the Hobbs Heirloom wool in packages?   I have used the Tuscany wool (120" x 120") several times and been very happy.  If used, is the Heirloom any heavier?  

 

Also, have you bought packages of Hobbs blend (als0 120" x 120").   Would like to use this with one of the above wools.  Make many King size quilts and need 120" x 120" batting.   Don't generally like packages, but frequently necessary to use on large quilts.  As you are so generous in sharing your knowledge, would appreciate any advice on the above.

 

Love this site and the generous people who reside here.

 

Marilyn

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I've found the quality of packaged  Hobb's Heirloom wool to be erratic. The last one I used had problems with thin spots. I love Tuscany wool (which is also a Hobb's product) because it's always even from edge to edge. I think the Tuscany is thicker. If you opt for two layers--the 80/20 and a wool--I think I would go with the Tuscany. 

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I have a spot under my stairs for batting where I am able to squeeze in about 10 different types of batting!

 

In order of popularity, Hobbs 80/20 in the 96" width is by far the most popular with my customers. I also carry the 120" for the larger quilts.  It has a bit of dimension, is warm, doesn't have any cotton flecks, and stands up to repeated washings.  I suppose this would be the case for most blends regardless of manufacturer, but Hobbs brand is readily available from my distributor.  And it is inexpensive. Quilters Dream is wonderful too, but expensive so I don't carry it.

 

After that I would say that the 100% cottons are next in popularity. I have W&N but most of my customers find it too heavy so it doesn't sell as well as I thought it would. Some of the other manufacturers like Legacy and Hobbs have 100% cottons that are not as heavy and work nicely in lighter weight quilts and I like them for crib quilts.  They get so soft and cuddly after repeated washings.  

 

Next by popularity really depends on the varying customers. Some prefer the wool and I find if they have tried both Hobbs Tuscany and Hobbs Heirloom, they prefer the Tuscany.  I also have a bamboo blend that some customers really like because of its softness, and I have a bolt of Hobbs Tuscany Silk which isn't overly popular - I think because of the expense because I am told that silk is really wonderful.  If anyone has more experience with silk I'd like to hear about it.

 

For 100% polyesters, I have Hobbs Polydown which is wonderful and puffy and very popular for larger charity quilts and quilts for teens and young adults which will end up in dorm rooms or washed frequently.  I also have Warm Company's Soft and Bright, but isn't overly popular. It is rather stiff and doesn't drape that nicely. It is very warm though.  If there are others out there who use Soft & Bright, how do you find it?

 

I've even tried a Legacy soy blend which is soft like bamboo, but it wasn't too popular so I don't carry it anymore, and I have tried a Legacy flax blend which was very thin and strong and would be great in a tablecloth. However, for tablecloths I think I would go with the Hobbs Thermore, and have been thinking about picking up a bolt as I do get asked for this from time to time.

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:lol: LOL!  It becomes a monster when taken out of the bag.  I have the same problem and have moved it to the furnace room so it doesn't take too much space under my stairs.  When it gets used up a bit I will bring it back in and tuck/squish it behind other bolts of batting to try to tame it.  However, maybe others have some better ideas?

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