Loading a Quilt with Double Batting


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I'm about to start on a quilt that is to have two layers of batting (cotton blend, and wool).  Are there any things or tricks I need to know to help me get it loaded properly?  I can foresee some difficulties getting the two layers of batting laying smoothly together.

 

Any words of wisdom will be welcome.  Thanks for the help.  Jim  BTW, I already have the backing and top pinned to my rollers and rolled up.

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O.K., I have spread the 2 battings out. wool on top of 80/20. kind of accordian folded them and stuffed them into my batting sling.  They seem to stick together, and I think I've got them fairly smooth.  So I guess I'm ready to go.  First time to use wool.  I sure like the way it feels.  Thanks for the help.  Jim

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Well, I'm about 25% finished with the quilt with double batting.  I must say I'm really impressed with the results.  I don't seem to be having any problems with it, and the looks of the quilting is very nice.  I'll probably become a real fan of the wool after this.  The feel and look is really pleasing to me.  Jim

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I'm working on one right now that is Hobbs 80/20 on the bottom and wool on top - the only thing that's tricky is the 80/20 is off a roll while the wool is packaged...so every advance I take extra care to make sure wrinkles and wads don't form in the wool.  Because it was folded it wants to suck back up into a pile on my frame!  :)  But the combination (or even wool over cotton) creates for A-M-A-Z-I-N-G and delicious texture!!!  I adore wool.  If it weren't so pricey it'd be the only batt I use!!!

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I'm wondering why it is necessary to use two layers?  I've never done it, but then again I don't do a lot of custom - mostly edge to edge.  I guess it would provide more texture, but at a greater expense. Most of my customers wouldn't go for it, so I want to give them an explanation that makes sense.  Wouldn't the Hobbs Tuscany provide enough texture on its own or is there another reason for adding a layer of cotton?

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Caroline:  I'm told that a number of competition quilters use double batting to improve the looks of their quilts.  It does provide a good deal more loft.

 

I did it on this quilt mostly to try it out, and because the quilt will likely be in our guild quilt show this fall.  I've finished it now, and I must say it does look very nice.  I did a lot of SID, and because the blocks are set on point, most of the SID was diagonal.  The loft of the double batting allowed me to do all the SID free hand without the help of a ruler, and since I don't enjoy ruler work, that proved to be a real plus.  I mostly wanted to try using wool batting.  I've heard so many good reports on wool I was determined to use it.  The double batting, wool on top of cotton blend, and it's competition use, made it easier to convince the piecer (my wife)  that wool should be tried.

 

What I learned is that the wool is really nice to sew into.  Except for the relatively high cost (twice that of cotton blend) it would become my go to batting.  I also learned that wool is much lighter in weight than cotton.  I weighed the rolls of batting I just bought, and the wool was less than half the weight of the cotton blend.  When a light weight quilt is desired, wool batting will be my recommendation.  Now in a double batt configuration like this quilt, it only adds weight, but I estimate the added weight is only one and a half pounds to the completed quilt.

 

Besides being very forgiving, the double batting gave me some of the nicest stitch definition I've ever had.  The stitches look nice on both sides of the quilt.  I couldn't be more pleased with the technical aspect of my quilting.  The only down side to this quilt is that it is a Civil War quilt, and the loft is probably higher than it would be on one made then.  As you can tell, I really like the wool batting.  Jim

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I have used 60% wool 40% polyester wadding almost exclusively for ten years. My quilts go in the washing machine and are line dried.

I prefer this extra loft, and no fluff! over 100% cotton wadding any day.

Never have a problem with definition in the quilting either.

 

Do any of your batting makers in the US make a 60/40 wool/poly batting?

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Bonnie - I never throw quilts in the dryer.  Well, quilts that I use get washed and dried like regular laundry...but I don't make nearly the number of functional quilts as I once did.  Most of the quilts I make now a days are for shows or display of some sort...and they are lightly hand washed (damp cloth washed by hand) and air dried.  

 

CarolieQuilts - I think the double batting is more about PUFF and texture than anything else.  Wool (IMHO) fills out the quilt unlike any other batting...it just looks really lovely.  But personally I wouldn't use wool on a quilt that wasn't considered a display quilt, heirloom, or show quilt.  UNLESS the client wants something very warm...but if you're using it for looks...well I also consider the function of the quilt.  Double batting I reserve for very special custom quilted quilts to highlight definition.  I actually think it's really funny how puffy quilts are coming back in style because fancy quilting is so popular.  I think it's a fad that may eventually fade out over the next few decades as something else takes over...however right now fancy quilting is all the rage and double batting really makes fancy quilting pop.

 

So do you (everyone) never throw you quilts in the dryer?

 

 

I'm wondering why it is necessary to use two layers?  I've never done it, but then again I don't do a lot of custom - mostly edge to edge.  I guess it would provide more texture, but at a greater expense. Most of my customers wouldn't go for it, so I want to give them an explanation that makes sense.  Wouldn't the Hobbs Tuscany provide enough texture on its own or is there another reason for adding a layer of cotton?

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