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Melzee

How do I load a quilt that will not have binding?

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I have a Lucey and am currently doing a quilt that will not have binding.  I know it has a name, but can't for the life of me remember what it's call.  It's the kind that you layer and then turn right side out.  But I am not sure how it could be loaded on Lucey or can it even be done?  

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Like how you do a tie quilt? I've never done one on my Patience (millie) but I did however do one on my domestic.  I actually started tieing it then my mom said she wanted straight lines. So I took out the ties, pinned it and started quilting her straight lines. That was one of my 1st quilts about 13 yrs ago. She still uses it every night lol. I'm no professional so maybe one of these wonderful ladies will chime in if this is a big no no.  


Wanda

Lake View,Iowa

Quilting with Patience (2004 Millennium) since 2013

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OK. It's a big no no. ;)

I think the process you're talking about is "envelope" sometimes called "birthing a quilt". Weird, huh? Anyway, it's difficult to load and quilt this sandwich, which has the edges secure and the batting inside. Too many things can go wrong, including bunching of batting, uneven quilting as the hopping foot pushes around the top fabric, and having extra fabric at the finished edges that gets pleated or puckered. Plus you'll need to pin the edges to the leaders to secure--how will you quilt those last inches or so? And where will you attach the side clamps?

 

If someone has done this successfully, maybe they can chime in with some tips.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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couldn't you quilt the top and batt together the usual way? Then take it off of the machine, then sew the back like a pillowcase then turn it right side out leaving a small opening too turn. The tie it together.More work but doable. No Binding

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This brings to mind an article I saw recently where a woman showed a magazine laying nice and flat, then she showed how when she rolled it up starting with the binding on the magazine how the back cover and inside pages all ended up at different lengths.  She said that was a good visual on what happens to quilts when you load them on the rollers making her point that people then understand why the backing needs to be bigger than the top, but that is also a good visual on what would happen when you load a quilt already sewed up on all sides....


aedc2cc10e0045c5397509e8f6b74d4d.png

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sewmanyquiltssewlittletime/

Proud Millie Owner!

Sew Many Quilts - Sew Little Time

Custom Long Arm Quilting

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This needs one of those warnings like in the commercial where the guy drives his car off the cliff...."Do not try this at home!!!"

 

I actually did this once upon a time.  It was the biggest mess I have ever done.  Customer brought 2 pieces of LONG PILE MINKY (no less) sewn together and turned and hand stitched closed.  No batting.  Any of you that have used minky know how slick it is on the back side.....  I was pretty new to my machine and didn't know how this would turn out, but I gave it a try.  First thing I did was put it through my DSM, stitching about an inch from the edge to stabilize the perimeter.  I couldn't think of any other way to keep the top and bottom from slipping and sliding on the edge.  Then I used that inch to clamp to and did a large meander/loopy thing.

 

Customer was thrilled.  Did I make any money--well, I paid for my thread.  Would I do it again?  Never!  I am older and wiser now and know how to say, "Nope, I can't do that." 

 

 

post-62883-0-82463800-1422369080_thumb.jpg


Hand driven green Millennium, Bliss Table.

 

http://bunkhousequilts.blogspot.com/

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I have quilted any number of odd things for customers, including an envelope quilt as described.  I explained that there was a danger of tucks, and that I couldn't quilt up to the edges because I needed to have a place to attach the quilt to the frame and clamps, and the customer was good with it.  I wrote all this on the intake form and the customer signed it, acknowledging the risk of tucks and that there wouldn't be quilting within an inch of the edge of the quilt.

 

I then pin based the quilt sandwich about every 5-8 inches.  I pinned strips of fabric (about 4" wide) to all the sides and then attached the fabric strip to the leaders and clamps.  I did a very large meander, taking out the pins as I approached them, and easing in any fullness on the top or backing.  I checked the back often to see if I had any problems.  I did end up with a few small tucks, but they weren't very noticeable.

 

So - it's not the best situation, but not impossible.  I find that setting expectations with the customer up front really helps.  \

 

I've also added additional quilting to an already quilted and bound quilt.  I did the same trick of pinning fabric strips to the sides so I had something to pin to the leaders and for the clamps.  It worked just fine.

 

Julia


Julia Graves

Special Occasion Quilts, LLC

Leesburg Virginia

240-472-1763

http://soquilts.com

juliagraves82@gmail.com

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