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I am looking for advice in longarm machines. I have one that I have had a lot of issues with. It has been replaced once already. Both have been worked on with parts replaced several times. Which has all been within the warranty time. The handle bars were replaced 3 times due to the lights kept going out. With the new set the light stays on but the buttons won't work. My dealer contacted the Company and they want the machine sent into them. Which I am ok with that until he says that he thinks they are going to cover checking it out and either replace or repair the machine, he thinks! We just might be out the freight. What! I should not out the freight. He promised me if I would trade my first one in for this one with a little upgrade price on the the frame, then the Compter. He would make sure that it was fixed, and I would be happy with it. Another reason I am upset over it is that the dealer made the comment that I still had a little time left on my warranty. Should it not start over when I received the new machine. This is why I am checking to see what everyone thinks I should do. Would I have a leg to stand on to just ask for the Company just to give me my money back? What would you do? Which machine would you go with if you had an option?

It is not an APQS.

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Yes, we know it's not an APQS. Send it back & get it fixed. When you get it back, sell it, and be done with it. It may not act up on someone else. Next go to a trade show & try every machine there except for that turd you had. I've had 4 different machines & choose the APQS. They will beat out the ccompetition every time, but make sure you try them all. You may like something else better. Take care & happy hunting. Zeke.

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My best advice is to ready your warranty very carefully . . .depending on where you live, you may want to check to see about return policies within warranty periods.  That might be going out on a limb, but it might save you.  Better Business Bureau may have advice, talking to the company directly and going as high up as you can, politely, but firmly.  Sometimes when they know you are talking to the quilting community, they jump a little higher to get things right, but not always.

 

Otherwise, Zeke's advice is about the best way to go.  

 

I am sorry you have had this experience and I hope the company will get you up and going.   

 

I was able to go to a trade show and drive many machines before deciding on my Millie from APQS and I haven't looked back, I step up to my machine every day and am confident it will quilt beautifully.  

 

Let us know how it turns out for you.

 

Joanne Flamand

Sales and Education - Canada

www.artisticquiltdesign.com

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Thanks everyone, but how would I be able to sell mine and get out of it enough to get into a new machine?

I have to tell you that I have never had a conversation with a dealer or company rep. on a sewing\ quilting machine. That lead them trying to relate my problem with a car problem they once had. I wish I would of spoke up to him then.

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:angry: :angry:I hate to hear you are having such problems with your machine. Zeke's solution might be the best you can do in the end, but there are a couple other things I would try first.

 

Talk to the dealer you have been working with, and get as much information out of him as you can. Who has he spoken with at the manufacturer, what is their phone number, email address, etc. I would expect to hear that a repair ticket has been opened, or some equivalent. They should have some record of the problems you've been having. Once you've gotten everything you can out of him, contact the company directly. Ask them exactly what they will or will not do, and what expenses they will cover, like shipping. If you're not satisfied with the customer service you get, escalate the call.

As someone else said, read your warranty carefully. If you don't have a copy of the complete document, request one. Do some research on the company; find their address and the names and addresses of the company's officers (preferably mailing address and email address). Send a letter of complaint to each of them, detailing the problems with the machine and the steps you've taken to resolve them, and ask them to rectify the problem, at their expense.

 

If all else fails, do as Zeke suggested and sell the sucker. The amount you get out of it may not be enough to get you into another machine, but it is better than throwing good money after bad. :angry:

 

Oh yeah, if they don't make you whole again, I would report them to every agency I could think of, like the Better Business Bureau, Consumer Reports, etc.

 

Good Luck!

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Great advice from everyone.  Keep an eye on that warranty date, don't let them push you around until it expires and you have a bigger mess.  If you decide to get it repaired under warranty and sell, you may not be able to recoup all your money however, you may be able to buy a very reliable used machine.  APQS sells their trade-ins with a limited warranty.  Trade-ins are completely overhauled prior to selling too.

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Give them the chance to fix it.  My APQS Liberty failed soon after I had gotten it.  I had to send it back and yes, I did have to pay the freight.  It turned out to be something wrong with the motherboard and they fixed that at no charge, but I was out the $75 to ship it.  While the freight didn't make me happy, having a machine that worked properly did.

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