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Use caution with the king size (120" X 120") Hobbs heirloom packaged batting. The one I just loaded was so compressed to get it in the bag that there were obnoxious creases and towards the inside it was actually felted from the compression. The creases were so bad that I laid it out and spritzed it with water. Then I had to redistribute the fibers with my fingers to take the tops off the creases. They are still evident if you run your hand along the top, but not so bad when it's quilted. The felted areas are not fixable so I made sure the worst end was at the end of the quilt so less of it was used. I had about 8 inches left, which I'll show to my customer. It looks OK after quilting.

I fully understand how this can happen and next time I might spritz it, put it in a laundry bag and give it a ride in the dryer without heat. I'll be warning my customers and next time I get one we'll open it at drop-off to inspect it. Just a heads up.

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I just quilted a quilt with a king package hobbs wool. I removed from the bag and layed it out on the frame heavily spritzed it with water and left it over night all the heavy creases were released. this was the first time I used wool and I love the texture it gives. I will have to watch for felting next time.  

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Linda and Terry, thanks for the heads up on the packaged Hobbs wool.  I will be using one in the near future and now I know to spritz and let it relax over night.  I also saw on another thread where caution is advised for starch and steaming with wool because it will felt. I almost use it on the quilt that I am working on now and had to starch and steam borders.  Opted for 80/20 instead and am so glad that I did!  There is so much help and useful information on this forum, thank you, everyone!

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I wonder if the package had been laying in the hot sun or something and sort of fused it together.  I've seen packaged batts lined up in the window of a local quilt shop and wondered how the sun affected them.   I rarely by the package batts and prefer the rolls or the 10 yard boards.   If it was brought by a customer, then you are stuck.  

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As Barb suggests above, contact Hobbs.  I had a roll of Polydown once that was terrible.  They sent me a new roll.  Requested sample of old roll and I  gave old roll to church group who made quilts for homeless.    Hobbs was very accommodating and agreed to plan for disposing of old roll.

 

Use the packaged Hobbs Wool 120" x 120"  quite often and so far have not had a problem.  Hopefully I never do. 

 

Was more than happy when they made it right on the Polydown roll.

 

Marilyn

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When I first starting quilting, I was taught to always slightly wet the batting, and then put it in the drier on low heat before sandwiching it in the quilt.  Is this not normally done by longarms?  While it removes the wrinkles, are there any other pros or cons of taking this extra step before quilting?

 

Cagey

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I had heard about the warm dryer too. Had a king size wool that was creased, a little spritz and in the dryer on warm. Well my home size large dryer wasn't large enough for it to tumble and it felted where it was against the back of the dryer...in only 5 minutes. Re-purchased wool of a roll. I loved the way wool quilts up!

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Creases in cotton batting get a spritz of water on the frame. With blends I generally don't have issues with creases. But that wool batting had creases where the loft was at least 50% higher than it should be. I spritzed and manipulated it with my fingers. Basically I scratched at it until the creased was distributed to either side. I know that the compression in the bag did it. The lengths of batting are rolled at one end to start and the resulting roll has to fit in the package without splitting the plastic bag. The inside of the roll was pushed into the next round and a peak (fold) formed formed only on one side---like a pleat. The packages are sealed with a vacuum system to take out the air. The pressure from that set the creases. It also compressed sections of the batting so it literally crushed itself until the wool felted. The bad section was less than 1/8th inch thick and stiff. I don't know if wool will fluff back from that crushing force. My customer is happy with the final result, but I'll give her the trimmed piece of felted wool if she wants to contact Hobbs.

 

I like Tuscany wool (also a Hobbs product). It's folded, not rolled. And the packages aren't compressed like the rolled batting packages are.

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Have you tried the Dream Wool?  I was layering two quilts one night and had a folded package of Dream wool and one of Tuscany wool.  They were very similar in quality but the Dream had a softer, easier touch to the hand than the Tuscany.  The Tuscany had more of a scratch feel as you stroked your hand over to smooth it.  It was nice to have them both out at the same time so I could notice the difference to remember for my next purchase.

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