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My eyesight has really suffered from longarm quilting -   eyestrain and need for reading glasses - increased strength.   I do a lot of tight, dense work.  

 

I am going for a laser surgery consult, not because of quilting but as a result of wearing glasses since I've been less than a year old and am hoping that it will help with the glasses that are building up in my stash. LOL

 

But -  my question is this -   do the glasses you wear for long arm quilting differ in prescription from, say reading the paper?      Do you have a specific prescription for longarm quilting?

 

 

 

 

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You may wish to speak with your regular eye doctor first.  You may be at a point in your life that your eyes are just normally changing.  They may also be able to get you the proper glasses that you need.  While we think we need reading glasses, you may need mid-range lenses to reduce the strain on your eyes working at a length farther than you would normally hold a book to read.  

 

There was a recent news report that kids are having vision issues, because they are not outside looking at distant objects.  They spend too much time in front of TV and the computer, so they need glasses for long distances.  You may find your eyes are more rested if you open a window blind and are sure to change your focal length every few minutes.  

 

If your work is rather dense, you may also try those dentist/doctor type glasses to give you a binocular view at arms length.  I saw them at a recent show.  They were pricey, but they did make it possible to see almost every stitch.

 

Good luck.

 

Cagey

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When you talk to your eye doctor, you should pose the question of whether a separate pair of glasses might do the trick. I wear trifocals, with the medium range just right for the computer screen that I work at all   day    long.  I have cervical spine arthritis and the separate pair of glasses with just that part of the prescription really helps when my neck is painful.  The down side is that I have to change out of them to read or see distances.

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I hate to tell you this, Andrea, but you ARE at the age where most of us need reading glasses. (sorry  :D ) and, unfortunately, when your eyes start changing, you usually need a few prescription changes in a short period of time.  Measure the distance that you usually are from your eyes to the quilting that you are looking at - tell your eye dr. that and he/she can get your prescription for mid and short range just right - maybe you'll just need a specific pair of quilting glasses to reduce that strain when you're at your machine.  I wear progressives when I'm quilting - and cheepo readers when I'm reading.  Good luck, my friend B)

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I spoke with my eye doctor about using using the computer and my longarm and he suggested a pair of bifocals but not normal bifocals....they correct for reading and mid-distance....I told him about my 26 inch Lucey....and he went from there...they worked great until a few months ago....I am due for an annual at the end of this month and I suspect I will be changing the lens again...I did not change them last year...so be all means...tell your eye doc what you do and want....I can not get used to line-less ones so have the old lined type....Lin

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I usually wear multifocal lenses, but have a second pair of glasses for the computer screen and they work also for my longarming, so I hang these around my neck in the sewing room.

 

These are the midvision of the multi and work great as when  I sit at the computer, or domestic machine; or stand at the longarm my eyes are a similar distance from all.

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thanks.  I wear contacts during the day and need readers -  but I think I'll go back and ask for  tweak prescript specifically for my quilting.   My eyestrain has gotten to the point that I have eye muscle fatigue especially in my dominant eye making my eye droop more when I'm tired, and I'm a bit concerned about that.   The doc didn't seem concerned about it , but I am.   I can accept and digest that I'm of the age to get readers now, but drooping eyes AND readers?   uh uh   :P

 

Bev-  I didn't know that it's possible to see a change within a close period of time when I first have the need for readers, so that tidbit of info helps.   I'm a big worry wart.  

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I wear a different strength of reading glasses for long arm and sewing than for reading.  My eye doctor said that's fine.  it's because the distance to the quilt is further than where I normally hold a book to read.

 

I had lasik about 10 years ago to correct my distance vision, knowing that I would progress into reading glasses.  I've never regretted the lasiks, it's miraculous.

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I wear trifocals for everything.........every day........I did get my prescription increased a couple months ago.   I could tell my eyes were straining because they would water and blur.  Since the increased prescription I've been fine.  

 

My eye doctor also said there will be a lot more young people with eye problems because of all the texting and up close screens the kids have now.   Same for their hearing........too much loud noise directed right into their ears with the ear buds or head sets.............When my car vibrates because the car next to me has his music so loud...........that's too loud.   We will have a generation of 30 & 4o year olds with bad eyes and hearing.    Too bad.

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I had to have cataract surgery in January and had Toric lenses put in. Thes lenses get rid of astigmatism. I have worn glasses since 3rd grade, 54 years of changing vision. I can now see distances with no glasses but need readers for reading and sewing. I have lots of different strengths of reader glasses for different things depending on the distance I am working at or if I want some magnification. I haven't worked on my long arm much yet so I am not sure what strength will work.

If your eyes are twitching or drooping you definitely need to find the correct strength of glasses to give your eyes some relief.

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I was essentially legally blind without corrective lenses - 20/1450 in one eye and 20/1600 in the other.  I had lasik surgery about 15 years ago and now I just wear reading glasses.  Generally, I just use a +2 for reading my computer screen or the paper.  I use those for quilting too, unless I'm doing really detailed stuff or need to pick stitches out.  Then I have a pair of +3 that I will use, but only for short periods of time.  My vision without lenses is 20/15 in both eyes.  Lasik was the best thing I ever did.

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I had LASIK 10 or more years ago. It was wonderful. No contacts no glasses, but age creeped up on me so I started needing readers. Did that for a couple years and got tired of looking for them, seems they were never were I needed them. So I went to me eye doctor and got bifocals that were clear in the top and prescription in the bottom. I wear them all the time I think they are great I've never been sorry and I do not have to look for my readers.

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I wear trifocals most of the time.  At night, if I'm just watching a tv program, I don't wear any glasses.  I read an article one time that said it strengthens your eyes if you do that.  However, my problem is the big floater right in the center of my vision.  It's been there for at least four years.  The eye doc says that it can move away or dissipate over time.  Mine is just taking its good ole time.  So I find that I'm constantly blinking my eyes trying to get a clear vision.  SID is really hard for me because I'm not sure where I'm going.  So I just try my best.

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Thanks for your responses with regards to lasik surgery.   I really don't mind if I still need readers, but if I can at least get some part of my vision steady so I don't have to wear contacts anymore, that would be a bonus.  I cannot imagine the freedom.    

 

I think the changing prescriptions for the readers and noticeable change in vision since I started longarm quilting is what is frightening me a bit. Does it coincide with being in my 40's ?  yes...but the strain and droopy effect in one eye totally coincides with the longarm work.     

 

Oh watch out -  I have always said no cosmetic surgery for me ever -  here I am with lasik,   next a lid lift (if the droop doesn't subside)  if the doc thinks it won't heal, and then next...what?   botox?  tattoos?   LOL

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I would suggest you speak with you eye doctor before you go to your laser surgeon.  When I spoke with my eye doctor, who has laser folks, on staff she suggested that I not have the surgery.  Except for the eye droop, I have the same type vision issues as you.  You will be changing your contacts for distant vision, for always wearing reading glasses after the surgery.  My doctor told me as I aged, my activities would more than likely change to inside activities.  As I do not need glasses except when wearing contacts.  If your contact prescription has not changed for years, it is simply that your eyes can no longer overpower the contact for near vision.  

 

My eye doctor suggested I just go to the drug store and purchase different power reading glasses for my different activities.  You eye doctor can tell you what power level you should use for reading, and for quilting.  It simply depends on the focal length.  Buy a bunch of them, as you will lose them or they will all migrate to one location over time.  You might also have to try different size lenses.  You might find your neck will start to hurt if you have to position your head so you can see through your lenses depending how far down they are on you nose. 

 

You might also ask you normal health doctor how they feel about laser surgery.  While the individuals that are pleased with the results out way the ones that are dis-satisfied, I know a few of people from church that have not had good results.  One a close friend had blurred vision for months afterwards, and had to have 3 sessions to correct the problem.  She still has to wear glasses.  Your doctor can probably also recommend who they would go to for the surgery.  As you are playing with your vision, you want to be certain you have the very best doctor possible.

 

Hopefully you can find a solution that works for you.  Best of luck.

 

Cagey

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I had lasik several years ago and don't need glasses at all for distance which is wonderful.  I do however need them for reading, computer and quilting.  I'm finding that quilting is requiring a higher strength lately.  Unfortunately I'm always walking around with glasses hanging off my nose because I read, computer, quilt so often.  I do love that I don't need them to drive and normal stuff but it is a pain to always dig them out for reading. If somebody could only stretch my arms I'm sure I could read without them :-)

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