sydneymath

To press binding in half or not; that is the question

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On a very small retreat recently with some of my Small Bee friends, we were discussing putting on the binding on a quilt.  Everyone but me agreed that after you had your binding strips all joined, the next thing to do was to press the binding in half lengthwise.  They were all quite adamant on this; not rude, just adamant!

 

Some speaker/teacher/program guest (and Linda Rech, maybe you'll remember who, or use this, too, although I know you don't do as many bindings as you do quilting!!) said that it was NOT the thing to do to press it in half.  She showed us that if you do press it in half, after you sew it on the right or wrong side, depending on if you're machine or hand quilting the finishing seam, that when you lap over the rest of the binding, the crease isn't exactly right.  Close, but not exact, because the outer layer of the binding has further to travel because it has more layers to go over compared to the inner layer.  I agree that the difference is NOT huge, not even 1 mm, but, to me, and the lady who taught this, it is different enough to not press the binding in half before machine sewing the binding on.

 

I know this method choice will not solve world hunger or world peace, but if you understand what I'm trying to explain, I would appreciate your weighing in on this topic, mostly just to prove I'm not nuts :P .  Also, if you know anyone, like some teacher, who teaches or advocates my preferred method, please give their name.

 

Thanks much,

 

Ann Ewan from University Place, WA, home of the 2015 US (Golf) Open Tournament!!  (Now I have time to sew again.  It was 3 blocks from my home!)

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At one time I always pressed the binding  and the crease was always off just a little. Then I wised up and that pressing is out the window.

 

Pressing I think may help with holding the raw edges together but I find that I can hold those edges just find.

 

I have to many quilts to make and need all the time savers I can get.

 

 Need help standing your ground, let me know


Dell 2016 Millie Frannie Ann Jr. with Bliss & she is Quiltaziod and Circle Lord Equipped with lots of Quilting Toys and now has Quilt Path!

 

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Well, I always press it and I've never noticed it being off on the other side, I guess my eyesight isn't what it used to be. I like the nice tight crease for tacking the binding down on the back side so right or wrong, I plan to KEEP CALM AND PRESS ON. :)

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I quit pressing years ago and have never looked back. I like the way the binding behaves and looks without the crease.


D92090BC49E8C634FED9A5815EF5ABB3.png

Serendipity: The discovery of something wonderful quite by accident while looking for something quite different.

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Are you talking about the pressing of say a 2 1/2" wide strip that you have cut for binding? or are you talking about pressing it again after it is a double thickness binding? I would think pressing it in place (from a ....say 2 1/2" strip) would keep it from twisting.  From that point, I don't press again.  

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Marci Baker has some tutorials on binding and she advocates not pressing. You can view her stuff on quiltwithmarcibaker.com. She has a good tutorial on binding 60 degree angles. I have pressed and not pressed and am of the opinion you should do what works for you.


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APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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Thank you all very much for your opinions.  I hope to get even more opinions!

 

What do you advocate, Linda, since, after all your hard and beautiful work!!,  you turn the quilts back to the customer (usually) and they bind their own?

 

Thank you, Lisa, for the tutorial sites.  I will watch them and perhaps post again.

 

Ann

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I agree--don't reinvent the wheel if what you normally do works for you.

 

It seems logical that waiting to press the binding would make for a better result. Interesting that a technique that is taught, used, and the standard of the industry could be improved upon. I think the pressing before helps to give an even feed of the edge when stitching. But with thicker batting like wool and polydown the wrap-around might need a but of adjustment for the hand stitching. I think I'll try sewing the binding without pressing and then flip it up and press the crease before turning it to the back. That will probably take care of any fold-back distortion of the pressed edge.  


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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And I do NOT press.  I agree with Dell.  Anything time saving is good as far as I'm concerned.  I always have piles of work waiting and never enough time.  I finger press the seams when joining the binding strips to each other, and then just line up the cut edges when I sew the binding on.  I also finger press about two inches of the outer binding fold when I'm turning the corners to make sure my mitered folds are crisp.  When I turn to the finish side though, I use three different kinds of final seam...zig zag by machine for a casual or often laundered quilt or small project, straight topstitch by machine, or hand sewing if it's heirloom, special, or delicate.  I like not having to fight the press line and I too find it's slightly off when I turn, especially over thicker batting, lots of pieced seams at the edge, or double layers of bat.  

My vote, no pressing.

;)

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I must work way too slow, as I follow Sharon Schamber's YouTube instructional video; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2hWQ5-ZccE  6 minute mark where she explains to fold and press the binding in half with starch.  

 

I starch and press the binding, and then glue the binding to the quilt before sewing.  It holds it secure, but it does take time.

 

 

 

Cagey


May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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Oh My.....I will never be a show quilter......I press my binding in half...stitch it on the back...pull it to the front trying to just get the edge over the stitch line from attaching it....and stitch it down with my walking foot using a "wobble" stitch...works for me...no glue or clips or anything...yep...sometimes a bit of the stitching shows on the backing...but lots of times the stitching stays on the edge of the binding on the back and looks fine to me...still takes time to get that binding on a big quilt...but I don't end up with so many band-aides on my fingers.  I have on very few occasions stitched it down by hand.... I just quilt for me and have far too many to get done....Lin

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Wow! This is a big news flash to me! I have never even thought of not pressing the binding in half! I've never had any problem with the crease but this sounds very interesting. I totally go with the no rules, I may have to try this just because. So for those of you who do this, do you use a walking foot?


Nancy

Gammill AKA "Gabby"

Hand Guided 

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I fold the binding in half, and apply the iron in one pass. This just barely creates a crease. Then I machine quilt, starting on the back and finishing on the front with a narrow zigzag. Not a show quilter here, just getting it done on my quilts. I would hate to do it by hand, too.

 

Al


Al Navas, EQ7 Instructor

My quilting blog: Learning to Quilt

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Like I said before, I do not press my binding anymore.  It's just an extra step that turned out not to be necessary.  I use 2½" strips for binding.  I fold the binding over and sew it on my quilt while it's still on the longarm.  Using the longarm I go across the bottom...up the left side...across the top...down the right side then across the bottom until I get to where I started.  Then I remove the quilt...fold the binding over and sew it on using the DSM and my walking foot most of the time.  I've been known not to use the walking foot also.  I pretty much do it this way except I do NOT press my binding in half first.  I do NOT use a ruler just my foot.  I have no problem with it matching up and sewing well and for some reason I managed to get it sewn in the ditch a little better than the first example.  There are lots of examples on YouTube.

http://jennysdoodlingneedle.blogspot.com/2011/04/applying-binding-while-on-longarm.html

https://threadtales.wordpress.com/instructions-for-piecing-on-the-system/

https://gaylemckay.wordpress.com/2007/08/24/apply-binding-with-your-longarm-machine/


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Serendipity: The discovery of something wonderful quite by accident while looking for something quite different.

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Thanks for the links, Oma!

I apply binding on the machine the same way, except I start at the right side. Starting and ending the binding there allows me to stitch an invisible join. No finishing the binding off the frame---it's all sewn down all around and ready to be stitched to the back.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I connect the ends before I remove it from the quilt also.  I just join them on the bottom instead of the right side.  My friend hasn't seen me do it and has never brought binding so I can show her.  She says it's because she needs to square her quilt up before she puts the binding on.  I've never had a problem.  (Gasp) am I saying my quilts are square?  I don't know, they seem to be.  They look good and I like them.  It works for me.


D92090BC49E8C634FED9A5815EF5ABB3.png

Serendipity: The discovery of something wonderful quite by accident while looking for something quite different.

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I connect the ends before I remove it from the quilt also.  I just join them on the bottom instead of the right side.  My friend hasn't seen me do it and has never brought binding so I can show her.  She says it's because she needs to square her quilt up before she puts the binding on.  I've never had a problem.  (Gasp) am I saying my quilts are square?  I don't know, they seem to be.  They look good and I like them.  It works for me.

 

 

Do you overlap them then Oma or actually do a diagonal seam to sew the binding together before you sew it to the quilt sandwich?


 

Terry

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Before I start to sew the binding on I make a 45 degree fold and finger press (or iron) that edge.  I sew my binding on, but leave at least 6-8 inches loose at the beginning.  At the end I place the end inside the fold of the other end (trim as necessary).  I verify it fits (maybe put a pin in to hold it or dab it with some Roxanne's baste it, then I finish sewing it down.  I'll try to find a video or online pics when I get back from doctor's. 


D92090BC49E8C634FED9A5815EF5ABB3.png

Serendipity: The discovery of something wonderful quite by accident while looking for something quite different.

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I used to press.  Then I saw an article that said the binding actually lays better when you don't.  Since I like to machine sew my binding (not on show quilts), I turn it to the back and sew from the front, the binding actually covers the seam line.  

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