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Erinmyone

Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges

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So this might be a crazy question, but is there anyway to float the quilt backing too?

 

Here's the story, I have a new customer that is intent on saving as much of her fabric as possible. Her quilt backing is two widths of fabric sewn together, but she decided not to cut the widths even because one fabric had nearly a half yard more length than she needed. Her idea was that if I started quilting at the top edge of the backing (this edge is even) then stopped quilting whenever I finished, she would be able to cut off the extra and get a larger hunk to save for later than if she cut it even beforehand and then trimmed away any excess after quilting. (I really hope my explanation is making sense, but if not I diagrammed it in the attached image.)

 

So I'm wondering if there is anyway I can work with this wonky un-square and uneven quilt back? The best idea I had was to partially float the quilt back over the quilt back bar and just be careful to smooth it every time I advance. But I am concerned that this won't hold the tension well.  Another idea I had was to sew some muslin to the shorter half to even the back out while I quilt then remove the muslin before returning it. Has anyone tried anything like this, or have any other ideas?

Thanks,

Erin

post-70627-0-98185400-1450506836_thumb.jpg

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Erin:

 

I do not know anything about long arming, but I hope you are charging her more for making your life difficult.  My father fixed cars when I was growing up.  He fixed all the neighbors cars, and he always warned them.  If they tried to fix it first and then brought it to him to repair, the cost was double.  This was because the fix job usually hid the real problem, and made diagnosing/repairing the real problem twice as hard.

 

My suggestion would be to have the woman cut the back to fit the front.  Why make your life difficult, unless you are getting twice the going rate.

 

Cagey


May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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Some people float quilt backs with success. I tried it once or twice but prefer it attached to the bar. I float the top, however. Personally, she is stepping over dollars to save dimes. The amount of fabric she is to gain is minimal. No matter which method you choose it is more work for you and you should be compensated. If she is insistent; you can always give her the backing to piece the muslin in. Whatever you choose to do this time she will expect next time.

I am sure others will chime in here who float their backs. They can likely give you more sound advice. Good luck.


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APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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I've never tried floating the back.  The two easiest solutions for your problem if your backing is not directional, pin the straight edge to the backing roller and have the uneven at the top and the other if you are doing freehand is load the quilt sideways.  Best for customer might be to fold the tail up to make a straight edge, attach  to your backing roller and then unfold the tail so it feeds into the leader first (if that makes sense to you).

Make sure you charge at least $5 or $10 add and remove the muslin if that is what you end up doing. 

Linda Rech has given us excellent instructions on loading an unsquare back in the past.  Pretty much the same technique Sparrow Studioz teach.  You can find them on Youtube.

Let us know how it works out for you.

 

Nigel


Brenda Wells - Green Millie. Sold November 2017
Nigel Wells - Ultimate 1 with Intellistitch & IQ.  Sold January 2019

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How much extra length does the larger piece have? If it isn't more than a few inches, just load with the seam parallel to the rollers, making sure the smaller pieces is at the top. If for some reason you can't load this way or if it is more than 12 inches or so, I would insist on trimming the back. Floating the back seems like a risky and troublesome thing to do to save a few inches of fabric. Ask her if that extra fabric is worth possible tucks in the backing after you have quilted it.

Carol

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Just because somebody somewhere did something ridiculous successfully once does not mean I have to try it. I would give it back and tell her to either choose another backing or even up that one in whatever way SHE chose..and let

HER figure it out. My prices are not calculated for the aggravating and unrealistic requests of my customers. She could save every inch of her precious fabric by choosing something else.


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Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one. :blink: 

 

Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 

 

As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.

 

As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh!  :P


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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 wind my backing all the way onto the back roller first so that that uneven edge would be at the very bottom of the quilt.

Since I use Red Snappers I could snap them on when the full bottom is level with the edge the problem would be the uneven or longer edge would then get wrapped around the roller and you would have to be very  aware of when the double up starts.  Stop and then unwind it all before quilting the bottom of the quilt


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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Lyn

That is so obvious load it in reverse to what I normally do.  Tunnel vision strikes again.

 

Nigel

NIgel I load all backing that way so I can spritz them as I go and remove wrinkles.  It also means I have a straight top edge, doesn't bother me if the bottom is crooked.  When I unwind the backing  so it is on the front roller before I start I can double make sure there are no kinks etc and the edges are even before I start to load the batting or the top.

Touch wood I haven't had any creases or pleats in my backing since I started doing it this way.  I also have some weights (2oz) attached to alligator clips that I clip to the very bottom edge of the quilt backing to hold it taut while I roll the backing onto the back roller.


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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