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In case any of the longarmers out there would like to get involved. Quilts of Valor is look for longarmers to quilts tops for them. Look at their website for more information from Elayne Gassett, www.QOVF.org I have been doing quilting for this organization for the past three years and has been great. Gives me lots of opportunities to create designs on various quilts and hone my quilting skills. The quilt tops I received have always been of quality peicing so not a lot of issues when quilting. They are in need of more longarmers and it is a great way to give back to our veterans.

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I quilted for QOV for about a year.

I had to give it up, as I was getting tops that were absolutely HELPLESS, and all I was doing was trying to figure ways to make it look presentable.

 

Now,with that said, i've seen MANY QOV quilts that were not only pieced wonderfully, but quilted with pride and not just panto'd to death or meandered.

 

Im sure the QOV foundation has since then, monitored these groups who piece together the  QOV tops.

 

It IS an awesome thing to do gals. If my time would allow, and my body....or if I had a computer...i'd custom and join back in, in a heartbeat!!!

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Very rewarding.  I quilted them for around 3 years too.  I haven't received one of my own yet, but I know the time will come someday.  Have any of the other veterans on here received a QOV?  I'm not complaining, the veterans in country,  hospitals and VA homes need them much more than me.

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Connie I haven't received one either but have referred older veterans for getting one because they were on hospice for health complications from mitilary duty.

Sheri sorry to hear about your experience but think QOV is monitoring the program better now. I am always told if it isn't quality work to send it back.

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I have been quilting for the QOV group in San Diego area for the past 5 years.  Most of the quilt tops I am given are very well designed and thought out with quilt shop quality fabrics.  I have received a few wonky ones, but the piecers tried and did their best.  It was my duty to make them beautiful for a veteran to cherish. 

The ladies in the group that I have meet are very lovely and hard working for the QOV cause.  It is a worth while organization and I really enjoy quilting for them.  I try to quilt 2 tops a month for them. 

I wish more quality longarmers would lend them a hand.  It is a heartwarming experience.

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I have been quilting for the QOV group in San Diego area for the past 5 years. Most of the quilt tops I am given are very well designed and thought out with quilt shop quality fabrics. I have received a few wonky ones, but the piecers tried and did their best. It was my duty to make them beautiful for a veteran to cherish.

The ladies in the group that I have meet are very lovely and hard working for the QOV cause. It is a worth while organization and I really enjoy quilting for them. I try to quilt 2 tops a month for them.

I wish more quality longarmers would lend them a hand. It is a heartwarming experience.

I agree and I also do two a month.

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Connie,

I found my birth father and saw him for the first time since I was 14 months old, on March 4th of this year.

He was in a VA hospital.

Korean War Veteran.

I looked for 40 years for him. Since I was 18.

After my 6.5 hours with him, I came home and called that states QOV chairperson.

She took to my father a QOV Quilt 3 days later, and 10 days after that, he died.

I have pics of him crying as he's receiving it from her.

I have that QOV Quilt. It's in my bedroom hanging above my bed. 

It is meandered. 

Would of been a lot prettier/nicer had someone put some time into it. Not over the top, but just anything but meander.

I'll post some pics if I can figure out how to add them here with my phone.

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I too try to quilt one or two Q of V's for our local chapter, which is lead by a couple of our guild members. Fortunately, most of the quilts are very well pieced, so it is a pleasure to quilt them. I have been to several of the presentations, and it is touching to see the veteran's responses when they receive them.

Sheri, I am sorry for the loss of your father. It must have been heartbreaking to lose him so soon after you found him. I am glad you were able to share the touching experience with him when he received his quilt. God bless!

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I am trying to do one QOV or charity quilt every fifth quilt.  I am not rich so I figure this what I can do to give back.  I just started a color starring system in my "quilts made on Lucey" log book so I can keep better track of them.  I picked up a QOV to do at the guild meeting as it looked like I was due to get one done.  I only quilt for myself and family and friends.  In my upper sixties I doubt I ever will be a wonderful custom quilter but as long as folks want what I can quilt, I will keep doing it.  Currently most of my large quilts are meander plus...I am working on putting different little motifs like leaves, swirls, bubbles, etc into my meandering ways.  I recently took a custom quilting class but worked on a smaller quilt.  I did find it taxing physically but I am going to keep working on it.  Hopefully I can get better at doing semi-custom large quilts.  I also may go more modern in my piecing as usually the modern quilts are not as densely quilted and still considered worthy.  Linda

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My dad was a WWII veteran (severed under General Patton).  Now that I am RETIRED (YEAH!!!) I plan to get involved with the local QOV and we have another group that does Wounded Worrior Quilts (Homeless soldiers with PTSD that go through a program that helps them learn coping skills and get back to work. The quilt is given at graduation time.  So this is very dear to me. 

 

Hope all considers either LA or piecing for either of these programs.

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Our local QOV group started a little over a year ago. Following our presentation in November, we will have awarded about 160 quilts since we started. I've made two and quilted 16 (in addition to my own). The quilt makers are then invited to help present their own quilt if they want to do that. It's a very humbling but rewarding experience. If you get a chance to see or participate in a QOV presentation, don't hesitate! Do it!

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I started quilting for the national foundation back in 2006 when my Air Force son was on his first deployment.  I found my experience with working with QOV to be wonderful, sometimes quilting 3 or 4 quilts per month, although I was only signed up for 2 per month.  I only do quilting for the quilts that come via the foundation or my own guild, as I was stung by someone who told me it was a QOV when it really was not.  Over the years I have only had a few that were not pieced very well, but I was able to still make them a beautiful and presentable quilt to honor a veteran with.

 

On a personal side, 3 years ago, my son required brain surgery and it was being done at Walter Reed.  His stay at Walter Reed was over two weeks long and my husband and I were there with him and his wife.  I visited the chaplain's office and explained my involvement with QOV, they honored me by allowing me to be at a presentation for an injured soldier brought in from Afghanistan.  It was humbling to say the least.  I also saw many quilts being used on a daily basis by heroes who were there on the Wounded Warrior floor for care and rehab.  The quilts awarded to these brave men and women are appreciated and used on a daily basis, even with the ones who move around aided by wheelchairs.  I came away with a heightened awareness and conviction to work for this wonderful foundation.  I encourage all levels of quilters to volunteer at some level to QOV, your work is appreciated! 

 

A small way for me to give back....

 

Lori

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I have been making quilts for QOV for at least 6-7 years. I love making these quilts (I only quilt my own) and feel it is the least I can give to these brave men and women. Over the years I have made about 60 or so QOV. I send my quilts to Alycia Carmin, the Colorado coordinator. She started working with the QOV Foundation when her kids were in school and she started a program to get the kids involved. For several years the school would then bus the kids to Fort Carson to make a huge presentation around Memorial Day. I loved what she was doing and teaching the kids. Now that 2 or her 3 boys are in college, she still works tirelessly (with a group of other wonderful people) to make and present quilts in eastern Colorado. If you want to see what Alycia does, click on this link to her blog ... http://alyciaquilts.blogspot.com   Every Wednesday she posts quilts she has received and tells stories about the presentation. 

 

FYI:  The first year I got involved with Alycia's group, over 740 quilts were given to Fort Carson for their injured and recovering soldiers.

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  • 3 months later...

Wanda:

I can assure you it is the thought that counts, not the quality of your piecing or quilting.  I would hazard to guess that your quilt tops do not end up with a 4 to 6 inch different in the three to four measurements for both length and width.  If your quilt tops are pretty much square, then you are top notch.  Concerning your quilting, have you ever heard the statement "it is not the gift but the thought that counts"?  

I can assure you with QOV it is the thought that counts.  In many cases when my guild is contacted for a quilt, they need one ASAP for a prior military member in hospice.  They center, home, etc, then has a little ceremony bestowing the quilt to the veteran.  We usually get pictures of them wrapped up in the quilt.  When the veteran passes, they family charishes the quilt as a memorial to their veteran.  

I say you go for it, and piece and then quilt a quilt for your local group.  Then see if you can be in attendance when your quilt is present to a local veteran.  You will see that it is the thought and remembrance for what the service member has done, and you remembering and thanking them for it that is what is the most important part.

God Bless our men and women that are deployed and away from their families as we enter a New Year.  May they all be safe as they go into harms way to protect us.

Cagey

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