lindasewsit

Goning to need some pixy dust for this!

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Ah yes..... let's piece a quilt top together containing a lot of bias fabrics sewn together, and then let's add an enormous border around the outside edge because hey, why not! :o:wacko::blink::rolleyes:


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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So.... For 10 years now, I've been longarm machine quilting for customers and I have seen my share of wonky quilts with enormous borders (which only exacerbates the inner quilt top issues) and... in all fairness, the customer probably has no clue what (horrifying?) thing she's done. So, she thinks all is well and good. I'm supposed to perform a miracle by removing all of the friendliness and fluffy fullness?  Usually-----if it becomes nearly impossible for me to camouflage and "quilt it out" ---  I pick up the phone and call the customer to explain the precarious situation. Do I need to be creative and just do my best and expect some fullness? Do I need to take a pleat or a tuck or two? Will they end up with dog ear corners? Do I remove the quilt from the frame so they get to take the quilt back and fix their errors? They get to decide how to proceed. They hired me to quilt their top together, not perform a miracle and not to fix their piecing errors. Sorry, but I don't have time to take their quilt apart and fix their quilt top. They get to make the decision. 99% of the time they say, just do what you need to do, even if it's a pleat, tuck, dog ear, or fullness.

 


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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4 hours ago, quiltmonkey said:

So.... For 10 years now, I've been longarm machine quilting for customers and I have seen my share of wonky quilts with enormous borders (which only exacerbates the inner quilt top issues) and... in all fairness, the customer probably has no clue what (horrifying?) thing she's done. So, she thinks all is well and good. I'm supposed to perform a miracle by removing all of the friendliness and fluffy fullness?  Usually-----if it becomes nearly impossible for me to camouflage and "quilt it out" ---  I pick up the phone and call the customer to explain the precarious situation. Do I need to be creative and just do my best and expect some fullness? Do I need to take a pleat or a tuck or two? Will they end up with dog ear corners? Do I remove the quilt from the frame so they get to take the quilt back and fix their errors? They get to decide how to proceed. They hired me to quilt their top together, not perform a miracle and not to fix their piecing errors. Sorry, but I don't have time to take their quilt apart and fix their quilt top. They get to make the decision. 99% of the time they say, just do what you need to do, even if it's a pleat, tuck, dog ear, or fullness.

 

Shana,  I know!!  I have already told her that there would be some fullness, but I had NO IDEA it was going to be that much!  I have stabilized the whole quilt now. and in that blue sashing, there is a pleat...just couldn't help that.  I have that area of the border pinned with about 60 pins! haha! well, maybe not THAT many, but allot!! I got to the end of the quilt as I was stabilizing it and it came out straight!!!  The last sashing lined up nicely with the bar and the bottom of the border is actually  straight too!!  Can't believe it!  It wasn't all as bad as that area that I posted...but a little full here and there.  But that one spot was enough to ruin the whole thing!!  And this quilt is for the Charlotte Quilt Guild show!!  :/


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Linda Gibbons

Cabin Creek Quilting

APQS Freddie (aka, Gracie ll)

Hand guided

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Hey... we all have wrinkles... and sometimes our quilts have them too. Ha! 

 


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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I'm so tired of working in fullness on quilts.  Now when I do my intake, I tell the customer that the quilt will not lay flat on the frame, will have wavy borders, and will end up with puckers and ripples if quilted as is.  I give the customer the option to take the quilt back and fix it.  None have so far.  So now I just quilt it and let the ripples end up where they end up.  I try to make it as smooth as I can and even out the waves, but I don't kill myself over it any more.

I've even given two of my regular customers lessons about how to properly attach borders to quilts to make sure they are not going to have wavy borders.  Doesn't seem to make any difference.  I can tell they are still just sewing long strips to one side until they reach the end, cutting off the border and then continuing on the rest of the sides.  Why is measuring and easing borders so hard for them to get?  It's really not all that complicated.  Well, anyway I stopped making it my problem to fix their quilts.  They keep coming back, so that's good.


Lora.

Lora in California -  Ultimate I with IntelliStitch and IntelliQuilter.  The Thimble Bee http://www.thimblebee.com

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