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I am following the video about checking/fixing timing. I removed my bobbin hook assembly. There were a few spots that needed buffing. After doing that, Amy says to give the assembly a good bath in WD40 and then oil.

Okay. Working outside, I held the assembly over the plastic lid of an empty mayo jar and spritzed WD40 in and around the assembly. Now I have about a teaspoon of excess WD40 in that lid. How do I dispose of it? Just leave it out there to evaporate? Or is there a better way?

Thanks.  Now please send all positive energy that I will be able to reassemble all this and get my Beast stitching properly again. Thanks!

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Thanks for taking time to answer, Sharon. I'm uneasy to do that since it is flammable, not that I'm using flames near my trash. LOL

Actually, I bet your suggestion would be great for most people here on the forum. But I didn't mention I'm in Phoenix. It will be about 110 today, and I think the temperature of a closed trash can would be even higher than that, so that's why I hesitate to put it in the trash.

For now it is still outside in the heat, hopefully evaporating quickly. I'm still hoping to learn if there is a better way or maybe a "correct" way to dispose of it.

Edited by ValerieJ
edited to add a bit more info
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Here is a link to everything you wanted to know about WD-40 except for you question.  https://wd40.com/faqs

WD-40® aerosol is considered flammable for other reasons beyond flashpoint. Aerosols must be tested for “flame extension” (how far a spray will carry a flame), and “flashback” (whether the spray carries the flame back toward the user). WD-40® does not have flashback, but can carry a flame forward, so it is categorized as flammable.

I believe if you simply collect it on a paper towel, let it air dry, and then throw it in the trash can you should be fine.  I have to ask, do you have the same concern when you put Cutex on a cotton ball to remove our fingernail polish, and then promptly throw said cotton ball in trash can?  

Just found this, #6 gives you the answer your looking for; https://www.cla.purdue.edu/polsci/documents/safetydocs/msdadocs/wd40.pdf

6 – Accidental Release Measures 

Methods and Materials for Containment/Cleanup: Leaking cans should be placed in a plastic bag or open pail until the pressure has dissipated. Contain and collect liquid with an inert absorbent and place in a container for disposal. 

Cagey

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Jim;

The actual propellant of WD40 is CO2.  WD40 will burn when sprayed because of the atomization, but will not follow up the spray into the can.  

Cagey

A propellant is the stuff that helps pump WD-40® Multi-Use Product out of the can. The propellant used is carbon dioxide (CO2). CO2 is an inert gas which helps empty the can.

WD-40® aerosol is considered flammable for other reasons beyond flashpoint. Aerosols must be tested for “flame extension” (how far a spray will carry a flame), and “flashback” (whether the spray carries the flame back toward the user). WD-40® does not have flashback, but can carry a flame forward, so it is categorized as flammable.

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Oh, my gosh! That is a lot of helpful information and some extra knowlege. LOL!

Thank you, Cagey, for the explanation about flashpoint and flame extension -- very interesting things I had not considered. And, yes, the rare times I use nail polish and, then, polish remover, I leave the cotton balls on paper towel in the enamel sink to dry out before they go into the trash. I am not sure when or where I developed this caution about those things going into the trash, but it is something I think about.

Thank you for weighing in, also, Jim and Mary. Knowing other knowledgeable people are comfortable with it makes me feel better.

For the record, a good bit of liquid did evaporate, leaving the oil behind. I believe WD-40 to be a combination of, basically, kerosene and oil, hence its cleaning and lubricating functions, and I am sure there is also a propellant of some sort to help expel it from the can. That propellant probably disperses or evaporates right away, leaving behind the WD-40 formula of kerosene and oil. That is not scientific or specific, but my layman's understanding.

Anyway, thanks for putting my mind at ease, everyone. I hope you're all having a relaxing holiday weekend.

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I just checked my can, and Cagey is correct, the propellant is CO2.  It used to be propane.  You could use it as a starting aid in your car or truck.  I guess it doesn't work as that anymore.

WD40 is a water displacing lube, thus the name WD.  I think it is a specific lube designed to displace water.  Neither kerosene nor oil, but good for holding off rust from damp conditions.  Jim

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