NHDeb

Wool Bearding through the quilt

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I thought I'd share my experience and the response I rec'd from Quilters Dream regarding the wool batting bearding through the lion quilt I made for my son.

I used black fabric and a darker red and the bearding was DREADFUL on both front and back of the quilt after washing/drying.  I was devastated and emailed the company with the photos.  I purchased one of those sweater shaver things and used that over the entire quilt - front and back.  It helped quite a bit, but it will never be the same as when I made it I'm sure. :-(
There was no bearding on any of the gold fabrics.

Below the photos is the copy/pasted response from QD Customer Service.

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"We have found that many high quality fabric manufacturers use a sulfur-based chemical in their dyeing process (especially when dying dark and vivid colors like reds and dark blues).  The sulfur is very good for fabrics because the sulfur molecule is five-sided, which causes a strong bond and makes the colors very color-fast.  The disadvantage to the “attraction” created by having 5 sides is that more surfaces promote static electricity.  (When you wear dark colors or a very vivid print, have you noticed that pet hairs and fuzz balls seem to stick to you?  It isn’t your imagination – the sulfur has caused a static charge making everything stick.)  In quilting, the combination of motion, handling, and weather (especially dry climates, machine dryers, or dry winter heating) will increase the static, causing the fibers of batting to ‘stand up’ like the hair on our arms and be drawn to the fabric.

 

The solution is to break the static charge.  You can use an anti-static spray, such as Static Guard both on finished and unfinished quilts.  If you don’t have an anti-static spray, put a few anti-static dryer sheets in a spray bottle with water and sprits both the fabric and the batting (or the finished quilt). This will not cause the fibers to pull back in, but it will prevent more from bearding through.  You can use a sweater shaver or lint roller to remove the batting "balls" from the surface once you have thoroughly sprayed the quilt with anti-static spray. 

 

When you wash your quilt, use fabric softeners in the washer and anti-static sheets in the dryer.  It is also helpful to remove the quilt from the dryer before it is totally dry and hang it.  Do not store the finished quilt or your quilts-in-progress in regular plastic bags as this really promotes static electricity. Using a humidifier in the workplace not only cuts down on static, but is great for your skin! 

 

The anti-static spray really works well in my own experience - a dark purple quilt that I had problems with completely stopped bearding after I sprayed it.

I hope this information is helpful and that you will not run across this problem ever again – it is truly the exception."


Deb

May your passion for thread & fabric creations bring joy to you and others!

Blessed wife to my amazing husband, thankful mom to my phenomenal kids, Caretaker to the very spoiled fur & feather babies.

Blissed APQS Lenni 2016, a few Janome's and a beautiful Featherweight

Blog: applewoodquilts.blogspot.com

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thanks for the information.....I haven't had too much problem with bearding...….I did purchase a couple of black batting but I think it was cotton?  I planned on using them when making dark quilts....I don't know if wool batting has that option...….Lin

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Deb, so sorry you had this problem, but really appreciate you sharing this information with the rest of us.  Hope your son's quilt looks good enough that it doesn't bug you every time you look at it, especially since you did such a nice job on it.

Betsy


Betsy

quilting with Emmeline, a 2011 Freedom SR

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Well, that's a shame! I've used Hobb's wool  on several quilts I've made and dried them in the dryer on medium/high heat.  I probably used one dryer sheet on a full size quilt.  The quilt was dark brown  and dark red Moda prints and I didn't experience any bearding.  Since this was the exception it would have been nice of them to at least refund the cost of the batting, if not the cost of the fabric for the quilt too.


Debbie

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Just realize, I loaded a dark homespun quilt (looser weave) on the frame yesterday and am planning on using a quilter's dream poly batt on it...hoping I don't have a bearding problem...will let you all know if I do....Lin

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I have an entire roll of QD Wool and haven't experienced this problem; I do wash my quilts in washer and toss them in the dryer, but do not dry them fully. I use a mixture of fabrics; but none of mine were totally of the darker, rich colors like yours. I am so sorry you experienced this; and I appreciate you sharing. I will certainly do some testing on my scraps of batting to avoid this on a quilt.  I would think QD would put some sort of warning somewhere in all their information about battings.


c7bae4be5138b5e1d1f267e209f5b9f6.png

APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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This is likely an exception, rather than the norm. I've used wool many times without problems. It appears it's caused mostly from the fabric weave, not the batting. Thanks for sharing the tip about spraying static guard. 


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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http://quiltersdreambatting.blogspot.com/2012/04/bearding-and-pokies-bane-of-quilting.html

Bearding: 
 
 If you have ever had a quilt beard, you know how frustrating and heart-wrenching it can be.  Once that soft, wonderful batting is in the quilt, the last thing you want is to see little bits of it appear on the top.  Bearding gets its name because back when poly fiber was stiff and horrible (think leisure suit) the fibers would poke through the fabric and then grow like an old man’s scruffy beard.  Today’s Quilters Dream Batting fibers, even the poly fibers, are fine, thin, long, and soft, and naturally resist bearding.  However, on the rare occasion given the wrong conditions, even the highest quality batting can sometimes beard.  
 
We have found that many high quality fabric manufacturers use a sulfur-based chemical in their dyeing process (especially when dying dark and vivid colors like reds and dark blues).  The sulfur is very good for fabrics because the sulfur molecule is five-sided, which causes a strong bond and makes the colors very color-fast.  The disadvantage to the “attraction” created by having 5 sides is that more surfaces promote static electricity.  When you wear dark colors or a very vivid print, have you noticed that pet hairs and fuzz balls seem to stick to you?  It isn’t your imagination – the sulfur has caused a static charge making everything stick.  In quilting, the combination of motion (sewing), handling, and atmospheric conditions, especially dry climates or the dry winter heating, will cause the fibers of batting to ‘stand up’ like the hair on our arms and be drawn to the fabric. 
 
The solution is to break the static charge.  You can use an anti-static spray, such as Static Guard both on finished and unfinished quilts.  If you don’t have an anti-static spray, put a few anti-static dryer sheets in a spray bottle with water and sprits both the fabric and the batting (or the finished quilt).
 
dryer+sheets.jpg
 
When you wash your quilt, use fabric softeners in the washer and anti-static sheets in the dryer.  It is also helpful to remove the quilt from the dryer before it is totally dry and hang it.  Do not store the finished quilt or your quilts-in-progress in regular plastic bags as this really promotes static electricity. Using a humidifier in the workplace not only cuts down on static, but is great for your skin! 
 
 
Pokies:   
 
You know what the pokies are – when the batting fibers pull through the fabric with your thread.  I don’t know what the technical term is, but everyone seems to know about pokies.  This is a different problem from bearding, but has the same result – seeing batting where you shouldn’t be seeing batting, on the outside of the quilt.
 
The first thing to try when you have the pokies is to change the needle.  It could be that your needle isn’t sharp enough or that there are barbs on your needle (even if you can’t feel them).  A customer gave me a good suggestion, which is to take the needle and jab it through the layered quilt a few times before putting it in the machine, just to make sure it glides through and there are no barbs.  She discovered that a couple of her needles had barbs that she could not even feel that were causing pokies on the back of her quilt.
 
If you are using cotton thread, cotton fibers are curly and will grab the batting fibers if given the chance, so use a mercerized or coated thread.  If you are using dark thread or fabric, give your thread a shot of anti-static spray as well as your fabric and batting.  I will leave the benefits of using a high quality thread to the thread manufacturers’ sales teams, but you have been advised:  use a quality thread and avoid a lot of headaches.
 
If you have never had these problems, I pray that you never will!  For the rest of you, I feel your pain and can sympathize.  I hope this blog has helped!

May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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