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quiltinmommy

starting and stopping

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Guest Linda S

Laura, you probably won't like my suggestion. I'm one of those people who can't quite give up my hand quilting days. I still knot and bury my thread ends in my quilt sandwich. I generally feel good enough about it that I can challenge someone to try and find my stops and starts. Of course, it does take some extra time to do this. I actually enjoy sitting and burying the threads. It's kind of relaxing. There may come a day when I tire of this, but right now, that's how I handle it

Linda

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I do the same thing. I pull up the bobbin thread and leave tails and when I take the quilt off of the machine, I tie the threads and cut them. I don't like to backstitch on top of the quilt, as it doesn't look too good.

Barb Wetzel

Ivy Corner Quilting

Altoona, Iowa 50009


Barb Wetzel

Ivy Corner Quilting

Altoona, Iowa 50009

515-967-0613

Retired and I love it!!

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If you use the floating top method, you can start off the end of the quilt and then when you put your binding on it will catch the stiching.

I usually just pull my bobbin thread up and then stich three times. A friend said she saw Alex Anderson doing this on her show. If I have to stop in the middle of a quilt for some reason, I usually just start a few stiches back from where it left off, pull my bobbin thread up, stich three (needle up and down three times in the same spot) and then go on with what I was doing.

Blessings and hugs

Tracey


Tracey Gelbaugh

Dragonfly Quilts

APQS Millennium

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If my thread breaks or I run out of bobbin thread, I tie the thread and bury the knot. Otherwise, I use the needle up/down button to secure the thread. I take a stitch forward, then backward a few times.

Judy


Judy Castleman

\'Judy Does Quilting\'

San Jose, CA

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I asked a National Quilting judge several years ago why they gave me such high marks on my quilting and they told me it was because I had buried my knots and had pulled my threads down and inside...they didn't want to see the starts and stops, so I have been doing just that ever since. Up until then I didn't realize that others were doing little back steps to start and stop...I had always pulled my bottom threads up and then went on....I didn't like the bottom threads getting caught in the quilting after the first time.

It takes a little longer, but worth the marks if you do quilting for judging.

Bonnie


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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Bonnie, do you tie your threads on the top and then bury them by tugging on them from the back? Do you double your knot or use a single knot? Would you mind explaining in detail how you tie off. I know it sounds simple enough but what I imagine you do might be totally different that what you actually do. I have gotten in the habit of sewing a few stitches forwards and backwards but I think I'd like to use the method you mentioned instead. It's never to late to learn the right way to do something. Thanks for your assistance.


Jean Weishahn

White Rooster Quilting & Design

APQS Millennium

Elk Grove, CA

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Judy, I was glad to read your reply. That is just what I do, too, and I was thinking after reading some of the other replies, should I change. But now that I've read that you do the same, I can think, nah, don't change! It seems to me that that would make your starting and stopping more stable than knotting and burying threads. When I knot and bury my threads in hand quilting, I've always worried about them coming out. I can't imagine that doing that would be more secure than backing up over your stitches (but then, what do I know!).


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Lynn McCartney

APQS Millennium w/Bliss

"Excellence in all things; all things to the glory of God."

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There are judges who count off for stops and starts but you can get around that too!;) If you know you're going to be having a ton of stops and starts, changing a few things will help.

For starts, I bring the bobbin thread up and hold the top and bobbin thread snugly while making my forward and backward stitches. Do NOT stitch a couple of times in the same hole as these will not hold. I usually bring my thread up a couple of stitches ahead of where I really want to start stitching, then go back a couple and then come forward and begin stitching. Of course, this depends on what and where you're stitching.

Using Bottom Line thread makes a big difference. A knot using a 40 weight cotton is going to show up a whole lot more than one made using Bottom Line thread. But . . I mostly always use cotton

If you're going to have a ton of stops and starts, a busy print background helps hide a multitude of stops/starts.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/60274663/63664097IHbTvO This quilt has a lot of black and purple thread and she sent a white muslin backing and I knew it was going to be a show quilt. This was before Bottom Line too! I was careful but the stops and starts do show. This quilt was accepted in the Chicago show last year (or year before last) and was accepted into a traveling exhibit that went to The Netherlands or somewhere and then was in the Houston show this past year. So, the stops and starts must not have been too bad.

Would it have been better had I hand knotted and buried all the threads? Probably but instead of charging in the $400 range, it would probably have been in the $2,000 range! Time is money and when there are hundreds of stops and starts in a quilt, I just cannot justify doing the hand knotting. There's a trade out -- if my clients want the perfection of hand quilting where knots are concerned, I guess they'll have to find a hand quilter. At some point, I draw the line.

So long as my own quilts and those of my clients are winning ribbons, I am a happy quilter!


Judy Laquidara

Brownwood, TX

APQS Millennium

Blog: http://www.patchworktimes.com

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Jean,

I pull up the bottom thread and then pull a 8 inch or so length, sink my needle with also a 8 inch or so length and take off...when I'm finished with whatever I'm sewing I stop pull up the threads again and cut them... THEN I get out my trusty dusty doll armature needle they are about 10 inches long and thread the ends of the starts and stops onto it. Then carefully slip the threads under the top and into the batting and run the length of the needle and if needed twice...I only tie the threads into a single knot and with it running that far under the top you don't need more than that....I've not had any troubles with thread showing through a light color top as I try to run them through the batting and it hides them....The judge that judged my quilt at the National Show in Reno several years ago said they had to really run their hand over the quilt a few times before they could find the starts and stops....and with the length being so long you don't have to worry about it coming back out with washing. Its been successful for me so far so I guess I will continue to take the time to pull the threads down and under...

Bonnie


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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It's always nice to have another way of doing things when the need arises. I had a quilt recently that I needed to change threads at a very noticeable spot. Your method would have been ideal Thank you for sharing.


Jean Weishahn

White Rooster Quilting & Design

APQS Millennium

Elk Grove, CA

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Laura, are you pulling the bobbin thread to the top before you start stitching? You need to have it on the top surface and hold it or otherwise secure it so it doesn't tangle up on the underside. Teri

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Hi Terry, thanks for the reply, yes, I do pull them both up to the top, but most of the time I end up with nests on the bottom and it looks terrible, no one has said anything about it but it just really bothers me. maybe I'm taking too many stitches in the same area when starting

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Hi Laura,

I simply bring up the bottom thread, hold on to both thread ends, have the stitch regulator on, start a couple of stitches in front of where I want the beginning to be and go backwards for a couple of stitches then take off. It works well. Sounds like you may be right & you are taking too many stitches in one place. Also, for your first 2 stitches you might want to slightly tug on the thread ends.

I also try to eliminate as many starts & stops as possible. With the Liberty I have the auto advance & one of the great things about it is that I have found a way to advance my quilt without having to start & stop my thread each time. I like it much better than the way I was shown.

Happy quilting!


Joe Ann

Ohio

APQS Liberty

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Hi everyone

I usually don't bury my threads unless the stop/start is on a plain fabric or if the quilt is for show.

What I do to start is:

Bring the bottom thread up to the top and hold if firmly, lower the needle into the fabric and bring it up,

hold the top and bottom threads firmly and do one stitch and stop with the needle raised,

put my finger nail just in front of the footand drag my finger nail and the fabric back slightly

take one stitch and the needle goes in just behind the first stitch

Release my finger nail and repeat 3 or 4 times

then cut off both threads from the top side of the quilt.

Good luck with that

Sue in Australia

?

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In answer to Suesquilts question, what I do would work with any machine that has the auto advance feed.

Whenever I run out of space to quilt & need to advance it, I do NOT cut my thread or move the head. I leave the machine exactly where I stop, no matter where it is on the quilt. I remove my clips on the sides and place the foot pedal so that I can stand directly in front of my machine & still operate the pedal.

My needle is in the up position & stitch regulator turned off. I place my left hand on the needle plate directly in front of the hopping foot and lightly press the quilt against the plate. The tips of my fingers are touching the front of the hopping foot. My right hand is on the right handle. As I press the petal with my foot, my right hand is pushing the head of the machine straight back at the same rate of speed that I am advancing the quilt.

When I have as much rolled on as I need, I reattach the side clips, turn on the stitch regulator & take off again. Once you get the hang of it, it works great. Try it a few times & see what you think.

By the way, I assume your name is Sue? How do you like your liberty and have you used it alot?


Joe Ann

Ohio

APQS Liberty

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I have always done a stitch or two back, then start off in the direction I'm going to be going, as some others have described. I recently read a lot of messages elsewhere from those who knot and bury their threads, though, and one suggestion I got there that I plan to try is to use self-threading needles to speed up the process and bury each thread as you go so you don't end up with a dozen hours' work after you take the quilt off the machine.

I'm not advocating this method, because I haven't even tried it yet, but it's another method some use. I don't plan to change my usual way of stopping and starting, but want to try this on a wedding gift I'm giving (it's my test piece for this) in case I might want to do it on anything I plan to enter in a show.

Mary Smart

Millenium:D

Vermillion SD


Mary Smart

The Cat\'s Meow Quilting

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