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Serger question


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Linda, I have a Bernina, and yes I use it often. Mostly when attaching binding on placemats or around vests that need sergered so the binding lays flatter, when I make Doctor and Nurse surgery caps.

Sorry can't help you with this brand...I do know that they are Canadian made, and they were sold in a very tiny Vaccum cleaner store in Sparks NV, but I have never sat down to sew on one.

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Hi Linda,

I just a bought a new serger last month, a Viking Huskylock 936. I'm not familiar with that brand that you mentioned, but I use the serger for garment work, making pillowcases, etc.

If you get a serger that has the chain stitch, you can attach your quilts to the leaders from what I understand and it is supposed to be quite easy to remove them.

Char

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I use an inexpensive brand three/four thread serger (Simplicity) which I purchased new several years ago. The video and the instructions are excellent. It works just fine and I use the heck out of it. It will not do a chain stitch, you need a Five thread serger to do that. However, you can also pick up the old Touch & Sew Singer machines any model number in the 600 series and they do chainstitching when you put the bobbin cover in, you might need to purchase that separately but whole boxes of attachments are sold for three dollars.

You can spend from $300 up to the thousands for sergers so it depends on your needs. My cheapie is great for me.

I wouldn't purchase a Gemsy, the ones on Ebay, tho.

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I was making clothes way before I became a quilter and a serger is wonderful to have for garmet making. My favorite t-shirt pattern can be whipped up in under two hours from the time I cut the fabric to putting it on. I serge all the seams and do a tiny bit on my domestic machine................finish with a double needle hemming on the waist and sleeves.

If you sew with knits a serger is wonderful. I also finish off all my seams for garmets with a serger finish..............keeps it looking really nice.

I had a cheap serger which broke and cost more to repair thatn what I paid so I replaced it with a Bernina middle of the line model and just love it. You do not need an expenisve serger as long as it makes a nice sitich.

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Guest Linda S

I think I probably won't buy this serger. I do need one, but I'll keep looking. I already have a chain stitch machine, so I'm not worried about that. I need overlock, rolled hems, etc.

Linda

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Linda I have a Janome serger and like it a lot. I also do a lot of garment sewing. I have heard wonderful things about the babylock serger. good luck. If you are ever in Portland you might check with Montavilla, they usually have good refurbished machines and they are very good to work with, even have payment plans

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Just my 2 cents. I wouldn't go to Montavilla. They have my regular sewing machine for the FIFTH time for a "tune up" They charged me more than another non-Janome rep did to tune up 2 machines. If they don't get it right this time, I'm getting my money back, and going to schlep over to Beaverton. I'm more than a little angry right now.

Beth

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I use a Janome 134 D. Bought it 12 years ago and have really put it to hard use. I've never been able to get it to do a rolled hem that was right and really haven't had the need for that so it's doing what I need it to with cutting and overcasting the edges. It's has 4 threads. It does not do a chain stitch which I wish it would have but when I purchased it I didn't know I would want it to! It works well, is dependable, the cutter has never been replaced and still cuts clean (even after hitting a few pins!) Back then it cost me around $300 because the new models were coming out and they were getting rid of the old ones.

Keep looking and test run a few, you'll find one that will follow you home and you'll love it.

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Hi Linda,

Here's my 2 cents...I have a Babylock Imagine and love it. It has the the ports to insert the 2 looper threads, push the lever and swoosh...the thread is carried though. Is is so easy to thread.

It has the 4 thread capability, doesn't do the cover stitch, but does a nice rolled hem and lettuce hem that I use for some of my baby granddaughter's knitted dresses for hemming the sleeves and bottom of the dress.

There is also a Babylock Imagine WAVE that is a bit more than the plain-Jane model I bought. It does a really terrific wave edge and add some varigated thread and wow! It produces a really nice finish.

You might want to check it out at www.babylock.com

Sandy

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Originally posted by Linda S

I think I probably won't buy this serger. I do need one, but I'll keep looking. I already have a chain stitch machine, so I'm not worried about that. I need overlock, rolled hems, etc.

Linda

Hi, Linda. I think you're wise to keep looking. Most people are brand-loyal, but you can go and 'test-drive' some of the better ones and then see if you can find one at a good price. Personally, I love Bernina products, in terms of their capabilities and where they're manufactured (Switzerland). I used to sew higher-end custom figure-skating wear and used my serger almost exclusively for construction.

Now, to ask you a few questions regarding your chain-stitch machine: what model, where did you buy it (store or e-bay, etc.) and do you feel it's worth investing in one? TIA

Carolyn

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Linda -- Do not be afraid of buying the Riccar. The brand has always had quality products - sold through independent sewing machine dealers. Keep in mind that Viking, Pfaff, Simplicity, White, etc do NOT manufacture their own sergers. They have machines "customized" by other, mostly "no-name" producers. Riccar was one of the first domestic sewing machine company to enter the U. S. serger market - in the mid 80's.

As a side note: Riccar are owned by the same company that markets Babylock and Simplicity brand sewing machines and sergers.

Johnmach

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Hi Linda--

You do beautiful jackets so I want to ask what the plan may be for wearables?

How great if you could do patterns for longarm-generated jackets, etc.

I have seen patterns locally from Dian Keepers and Laura Lee Fritz and then the recent tutorial from JoAnn H. with that pretty sweatshirt.

I purchased an easy pattern and am awaiting a nice on-line ordered sweatshirt from Nancy's Notions.

You have a whole army of fans here if you want to start a pattern line!!!

Sorry to go off-subject here.

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Guest Linda S

Thanks all for the info. I'm not really thinking of starting a pattern line. I just want to do more wearables. I want to enter some in competition too. Last year at MQX, I helped out in the judging room for wearables. I got to hear a lot of the comments. Most were about poorly finished seams, bulk in the underarms, etc. If I'm going to enter my stuff in competition, I want to make sure I do well!

As far as machines, I have a Bernina for most of my sewing (a 153QE), a Singer Featherweight, and a Willcox and Gibbs Chainstitch machine. I do have a taste for high-end items, so I was thinking that if I go to the local dealerships, I'm likely to be followed home by something fancy and very expensive. Since I just plopped down almost $10,000 to put up a fence around my house, I'd like to keep the spending down a bit for a while! ;)

Linda

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LInda: I have a bernina 1300mdc which is able to both coverstitch and overlock stitching. It also has the micro thread control to tweak the tension. I am mostly a quilter, but really like the versatility of the coverstitch for seaming hems neatly too. the berninausa.com site will give the details of the machines. sue

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Hi Linda - I didn't have a serger but I do have a Riccar DM. I love it. Very heavy duty for back in the days when I had a business making drapes. I could go through 16 thicknesses of fabric with it and I had to go slow, but with a #18 needle (aka nail) I could bar tack those pleats in place like nobody's business. I still use it as it has a size L bobbin like our APQS and I use it as my bobbin winder. If they make as good of a serger as they did a DM, I would buy it in a heartbeat.

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  • 13 years later...
On 8/29/2007 at 10:38 PM, Bekah said:

Linda I have a Janome serger and like it a lot. I also do a lot of garment sewing. I have heard wonderful things about the babylock serger. good luck. If you are ever in Portland you might check with Montavilla, they usually have good refurbished machines and they are very good to work with, even have payment plans

Montavilla sewing machines center is also very user friendly, which makes them a great choice for just about any beginner sewer. In addition, you can count on their years of knowledge and craftsmanship to ensure you get a quality product that will work long into your sewing career.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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