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Several of you have sent e-mails to me privately asking how I got started and got the clients. I'm no expert but here are some thing that worked for me.

1. Do NOT start trying to get business before you are ready. Make sure that the work you are producing is worthy of being scrutinized by potential clients. If you aren't ready and they look at that work, that is what they remember and it will be hard to overcome that initial impression. Do NOT think you can charge less because you are just getting started and your work may not be quite up to par. Practice, practice, practice until you know you are good enough to pass inspection by the clients you wish to attract.

2. No matter where you are heading out to search for business, appear professional. No need to dress up in a business suit but be neat, organized and confident.

3. If you are going to sell yourself to a quilt shop, the shop owners don't have a lot of time to visit with us and they are inundated with longarmers wanting business. I'd have a little brochure or handout specifically created for that shop owner and I'd tell her I'm a longarm quilter, let her know I'd appreciate her business and hand her the brochure. At this point, you will probably know if she is interested are not. Some shop owners have a very tight relationship with the longarmers they are currently using.

4. I'd have samples of my work in the car in the event they want to see it. They may not but if they do, you have it right there on the spot. I'd have a custom, panto and overall meander type to show them. It wouldn't hurt to have pictures of those exact three quilts with the price range on the back so they can remember. Say I have a custom quilt and that is in my .035 - .04/square inch range. If the shop owner sees that quilt with the quilting and then has a picture of the same quilt, they are more likely to remember ME and my quilt.

5. I would not join a guild just to get business. Chances are there are already longarmers in the guild and they may be a bit protective of their "space". If you have not previously been in a guild, I would recommend joining and not even mentioning that you are longarmer but taking something really catchy to every single show & tell. Someone will eventually ask who quilted it and when they do . . be ready!

6. Enter your own quilts in local shows. I have a quilt at Paducah right now and OMG! Those quilts there are fantastic. Mine is probably the worst one there and I know I'll get no business from that because the others there are so overwhelming. But, when that quilt is entered in a local show or really anything way smaller than Paducah, it attracts a lot of attention.

7. Don't appear too anxious. Most longarmers have a fairly long waiting list so if you go in telling people you can do all their quilts tomorrow, they're going to wonder why you have no business. If you tell them you're new and haven't established a following yet, they may not wish to chance it. So, be careful how you react when you're so excited to get a client!

8. If you can teach classes at either local quilt shops, fabric shops, community education . . wherever . . quilt your samples and most everyone will want theirs quilted just like yours. Be careful what you do on your own quilts though. If you do some elaborate custom job and then one person in the class asks (and they WILL), how much would it be to get my quilt done just like yours and you have to say $400, then every one in that class will have cemented in their brain that you are WAY TOO expensive! So, if I'm doing a sample for a class, I almost always try to go with either a panto or an overall meander so that when someone asks how much it will cost to have their quilt done just like mine, I can quote a price that seems reasonable.

Now that I've told you all I know . . if you have other questions, post them here or e-mail me.


Judy Laquidara

Brownwood, TX

APQS Millennium

Blog: http://www.patchworktimes.com

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Guest Linda S

Judy - this is great information. I started calling a few quilt shops in the area yesterday to get a feel for how much business was available out there. Boy was I shocked. One of the shops were I buy quite a bit of fabric seemed very down on the idea, claiming that there wouldn't be enough business to keep me afloat, it wouldn't be a good idea, they had looked into it and it would be a waste of money. :( The other shop where I buy a lot of fabric (seems to be a theme developing here) I was a little afraid to call, because they have a relationship with a local machine quilter and I didn't want to appear to be horning in on their business. Well, they were ecstatic that I was considering it. They suggested that when I was ready that I bring in something I had done for display along with my business cards or brochures. They also suggested that if I didn't have quillts that I had done, I could offer to do one of their tops at a discount, so they could display it for their customers to see as an example of my work. They could not have been more accommodating! I was amazed. They also said that the group they use commonly has a 4-6 week back-up and that stuff that needs to be done for the holidays needs to be in by November 1, so if I was ready to go by that time and had time to spare around the holidays, I could really make some money. So, I guess my advice would be to take a wide survey when trying to get information. I'm gonna do a little more calling around and see what I come up with as the average reply. All I can say is I get more and more excited every day!!

:D

Linda

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I know this is an older thread, but I am just getting started and have probably done everything JudyL said NOT to do when starting. So does that mean I'm screwed? I've bought this $15000 machine that is just going to suck down payments, and have nothing to help pay for it? So far, my experience has been that everyone I have showed samples to has had really good things to say about them, asked to keep one (I made some small ones) and said things like "I'll send business your way" and "I have this shop sample but am waiting for the backing, so maybe you could do it" (no phone call to do it, however), or "I have things that need to get done quickly for the shop hop" (which starts this Saturday, no phone call to do them, visted this place last week) Basically everyone has been "all talk". I am getting somewhat depressed. I don't know what else to do, I can't afford to advertise in every newsletter or magazine.....is this normal? I did research in this area and EVERY person without exception said that all the longarmers were "booked solid" and there was "a lot of work out there." WHERE????? Any ideas? Sorry to be so down and thanks for letting me rant. Maybe I'm just impatient. I've had my machine since November 2005 and it now March and no customers. I'm getting scared.

Robin in So. CA.


Robin Kinley

Vista, CA

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Hi Robin,

I too am new to longarming, got my machine the very end of May '05. Right away I joined both guilds in my area and immediately started taking charity quilts to practice on. Before I knew it I was getting customer quilts. Several of these people were tired of waiting months for their quilts, so they figured they would give me a shot. I guess I did something right.;)

I have not relied on the quilt shops at all, I do have cards in them, but I think I have only had one referral in almost a year.

I agree with Judy, do as much show & tell as you can, I try to always show at least one quilt that I have done at guild each month. I also belong to a Thimbleberry club at one of the local shops, that is a good show & tell oppportunity as well. Have gotten customers from that too.

Just last month I entered 2 quilts in a local show and won an Honorable mention on one of them. I placed an ad in the show brochure so I wanted people to see my work at the time. That ad has brought in one quilt so far that more than paid for the ad.

If you do belong to a guild, check into putting your name in the newsletter. I was able to put mine in both newsletters at no cost, you may be able to do the same.

I try not to have more than 2-3 weeks turn around time. That has made my customers very happy.

Hope things turn around for you soon.

Patty


Patty Butcher
Katydids Quilting Studio ~ APQS FL Store
IntelliQuilter Dealer
EdgeRider Wheels Dealer
Brooksville, FL (Central FL)
352-397-4959, 850-502-0272 Cell
http://www.katydids.net
patty@katydids.net
New Generation Millennium W/IQ; 2015 Lucey with Quilt Path: George

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Interesting how this older post has surfaced again but I can relate to some of the good advice I have read.

Some things that I have learned.

1. Throughly look the quilt top over for loose seams and bad piecing. Do the same with the Backing fabric.

2. DO NOT QUOTE a quilt too quickly. Be sure you understand what the customer expects from you and your talents. I just quoted a quilt at .03 and well I think it probly should have been more. I also quoted 10 cents a linear inch for the binding but wasn't clear that I wanted it to be prepared to attach. So now I have to cut, press and attach the binding, put more details than I origially thought but probly for less than I should. I am happy to do this as I believe the mistake was mine and I want to have a happy customer. I just chalk it to learning. I just need to slow down and have a check list of questions and clarifications that I go over with my customers.

3. Don't be RUSHED to complete something that isn't realistic for your WORK schedule. In a perfect world you might finish the quilt in a day. In the other world it might take all week due to bad borders you didn't properly inspect or poor piecing. I simply am not going to do any more RUSH JOBS. It put me under pressure and I loose the joy of quilting for that time. I quilt because I love it. When rushed it takes away my JOY. Yes there will probly be exceptions.

4. KNOW YOUR MACHINE and all its little quirks. EXPERIENCE IS SO IMPORTANT.

5. I find I must have time for MYSELF and to QUILT FOR MYSELF. I may not get rich doing this but I will have piece of mind. I think I have rushed my Learning and so I am going to slow down and get a better perspective on this New adventure.

6. Set goals and make them REALISTIC!!!!

7. KEEP A POSITIVE ATTITUDE

Thanks for the advice Judy even though it was given some time ago. Newbie's appreciate it all the same.


Tammie Baggett

aka Grammie Tammie

926 Stephens Dr

Westcliffe, Colorado 81252

grammietammie2014@gmail.com

 

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Robin, please don't get discouraged or frustrated. It does take time. I've been quilting for 8 years now and I hardly remember those first few years. Also, when I started, there weren't so many longarmers and it was pretty easy to establish a loyal customer base.

It may take a bit longer now simply because of the number of longarmers out there, as well as those buying the home setups.

Based simply on what I see in my area and the quilts I receive through the mail, I still feel there's an abundance of toppers looking for longarmers. These days I refer our more business than I accept.

Based on what you've posted, my recommendation would be to go back to the shops you've already visited. Were you a customer there before you began longarming? The quilt shops are bombarded with longarmers looking for business.

Maybe spend some of your down time making tops on which you can do outstanding quilting and enter in shows or county fairs. Getting your name out and having people see the quality of your work is the best advertising you can do.

Good luck!


Judy Laquidara

Brownwood, TX

APQS Millennium

Blog: http://www.patchworktimes.com

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Robin: I sent a U2U message. Take your time, don't panic, and you will do fine. Classes are by best source, followed by the store where I teach. This past December was my 2nd, but I was busy until the 20th and did 11 quilts that month.

Cynthia


Can you quilt it out?

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Brochures are deffinately better at getting customers than the traditional business card. I have had customers tell me that they appreciate my brochures because everything was spelled out for them in it and their was no surprises later. Also not everyone has access to the internet so even though having a website is a good thing for your business not everyone will be able to access it. Also when someone calls you for info be friendly, confident and accomidating, don't try to rush them off the phone if they have lots of questions. I also reccomend that when you approach the quilt shops that you bring in some of your own quilts that you have done not only does your work talk for itself but if you bring them in during a busy time of the day you will be surrounded by potential new clients who start asking questions and brochures/cards. But don't expect the clients to call in the next few days (most of them are in the process of completing their quilt and it may be a week or two before they actually do call) but they will call. I also noticted that most quilters travel in packs and if one tries you out and they are pleased with your work then word of mouth will spread like wild fire through the pack and before you realize it you will be quilting for all of them. Most quilters also tell me that they will avoid a long armer if their turn around is too long.They like turn arounds 4 weeks or less.

Joann

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Thanks so very much to everyone who replied. I do have brochures and have left them, as well as samples that I show every shop owner. I have advertised in my own guild newsletter, but there are 5 of us longarmers in the guild, so I'm not holding my breath there, although I have had 3 ladies tell me they are making quilts and will give them to me to do. I guess I'll wait and see. I definitely need to get my own quilts quilted and show them. I am working on one right now. That has been on my mind alot, so I know that is the right thing to do. Thanks for giving me "permission" to work on my own!!! Somehow I got the idea that all I should be doing is marketing and practicing on charity quilts and muslin! I've done several for Rosie's Calico Cupboard here in San Diego and my name is up on the webiste under the volunteer longarmers. I'm not sure what everyone means when they say to take classes. You don't finish projects there, but I can tell people what I do and bring brochures and stuff. Is that it? Right now I'm having a tough time justifying spending the money taking classes because I'm not earning any, but it being a business write off, I should just go ahead, I s'pose. BTW, I don't know how to access the U2U message. I saw it, and clicked on it, but didn't see a message. Must have done something wrong...

Robin


Robin Kinley

Vista, CA

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Hi Robin,

I agree that it is more difficult to break in to business with many more longarmers out there. There are several in my area as well. However, we all seem to work differently and each has her own style. I would make several of your own quilts, quilt them as you prefer and then make sure others see them. A finished quilt is the best advertisement. Most of my referrals come from my customers who show other quilters their quilts once they are finished. I do mostly freehand work whether it be overall or custom. People know what to expect when they come to me. They know what to expect from the others. None of us can please everyone. I try to stick to what I enjoy doing and not worry about the rest.

Kay

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Hi Robin,

I too know what it is like to start your own business in longarm quilting. Have had some good and bad response from quiltshops in my area, but in general some have been helpful. I will tell you this that having people see your finished work is the best advertising. Where I live there are a few longarm quilters already established and they are very territorial about new people coming and starting business, but just word of mouth and telling people what you do is good also. I also have a suggestion of places to advertise information on your quilt business and that is the local beauty shop. There are alot of eldery women that do quilting and do enjoy having you do work.:)

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Robin,

I know where you are sitting. I too got up and running around Nov 2005 and it is slow going to get business. For me, my first customers quilt was a 16 block sampler that she wanted something different done in every block. I knew, when I quoted a price to her it was too low but, I was hoping it would be good advertising. That was in Jan. 06. It took me 32 hours to do that quilt and I was having a mental breakdown wondering what I had gotten myself into. I also know that it has really sparked some serious interest and will eventually lead to some additional jobs even though, it's only currently sparked one job. Since 1/06 I've done 8 quilts and have 1 repeat customer, on the calendar already, for March. And yes, I'm still frustrated, concerned, worried, and still not charging enough for my time and ....... but, I'm trying to stay focused that I'm not in control of what happens with our quilting business - God is- even when I'm having to make my machine payment and wondering where it's going to come for the next household bill due. For now, I've discovered getting underpaid is cheaper than paying for advertising in the newspapers, etc. In fact, I had a nice article published on our new business and because of that article the county appraiser is now charging me personal property taxes on my business equipment (only the machine) - about $500 per year. In the long run, I'm hoping the article will pay for the taxes. Keep plugging away and try now to be discouraged. I know, that's easier said then done.

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Thank you all. Every response has been helpful in different ways. It is really great to get other perspectives. Stitchinsally, what a complete drag about the extra taxes! Anyway, I'll keep plugging away and like you said, God is the One in control and I need to keep trusting. :)


Robin Kinley

Vista, CA

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Robin:

I want you too know I have payed for 2 quilting machines,,, I did not start out big,,,I did not advertise,,,, I feel it was a waste of money I could spend on other quilting supplies like batting and thread,,, I shop a lot a JoAnn and they know I own 2 quilting machine,,, word of mouth,,, is the best advertising,,,, I mailed out a quilt today I had finshed for a customer and while at the post office,,, a woman just getting her mail said Oh,,,, what a beautiful quilt,,, do you quilt for people,,, I said yes,,, then she ask me my price,,, and I told her,,, and she wanted my phone Number immediately... you can be in the strange places,,,all it takes,,, I don't spend a lot of money advertising,,, it other people telling people...Don't give up or get distress out,,, You aren't going to make a killing on doing quilting,,, but it something you want to enjoy...

But I quilt awful cheap... here in my area,,, I live in a very poor area... just SS people,,, and low income.... so you have too give and take ... I donate alot of quilt to charity here in my area,,,,and I feel like I get blessed in return... and when my quilt get action off,,, then I have people come and want me too do theirs,,,, a lot of ways to get quilt to do,,, but keep smiling,,, God always blesses us quilters some how ....

or does he... he sure has me:P


Wilma DePriest

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I know this is an old discussion, but I need a pep talk. I got my machine in May of 2005. I immediately practiced, practiced, practiced until I got pretty good at simple designs. I practiced some more until I got really good at SID and simple pantos, plus some freehand designs. I feel confident about my quilting. It is good. So what is my problem?

Well, since May of 2005 I have only had three paying customer quilts. One lady came and picked hers up and claimed to love it. She said she had nine more at home waiting to be quilted. She was supposed to call and set up a time to drop them off. She never did. When I called her back, her husband told me she had been too busy.

There is another lady who I have talked to three times. Each time she tells me she is going to bring this quilt over for me to do. She calls and calls, but never shows up. Just talk.

Before I got my machine I checked around. The local sewing shop assured me there was a big need for quilters. They said they would send all their business to me. I have only had one referral from them.

There is no guild in our area. The closest guild is 45 miles away. That is also where the large fabric shop is.

I have sent out brochures to churches, schools, girl scouts, nursing homes, and 4H. I have advertised in the local shopper's guide. I have gotten many calls from this ad, but nobody ever follows through.

I had one girl say she wanted me to do her Tshirt quilt (cutting, piecing, quilting). I told her $100 for a full size quilt (I'd supply the backing and batting; and do the binding). She called me back and said that was to expensive and she found somebody who would do it for $50. I don't know if I believe her or not.

Quilting is very popular around here. There are always bunches of quilts entered in the fair. There are lots of ladies who piece in their spare time and have bunches of unquilted tops laying around. I know, because it seems like they've all called me. But nobody ever actually hires me. I even have offered to pick up and drop off for free (up to 50 miles).

Now I have found out another quilter just got a machine in our area. I talked to her. She bought a Grace frame with a Juki machine. I know I can quilt larger patterns than she can. She said she is doing a lot of quilts for her church ladies. Once they find out she is quilting she will probably get the word of mouth business; unless I can get some business first.

Okay, so what do I do? I still owe my in-laws $2500 for my machine (they loaned the money for one year). I haven't made any profit. I am so discouraged. I'm about ready to sell the machine for $4000 and just quit.

Somebody please tell me what I can do to make this business work.

Thanks, Teresa

www.chickenscratchquilting.com

P.S. Sorry this is so long, but I had to vent.


8259635bf834a637a7febcce54170daf.png Sweet T's Custom Quilting Finley, TN  (731)-445-6411 sweet_t_quilting@yahoo.com

 

http://sweettsquilting.blogspot.com

https://www.facebook.com/SweetTsQuilting

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Guest LA

Hi Teresa,

It sounds like you have done just about everything, which makes me wonder if you live in an area that is remote, or economically depressed?

I see that you have a nice web site, why not utilize that to its full potential?

Try putting an ad in the larger quilt magazines. You can list your web site only, in bold font for a very reasonable rate.

I know from the ads that I did run that it didn?t take long before I had quilt boxes on my front porch!

I think you will be pleasantly surprise, & you certainly don?t have any thing to lose! ;)

Please keep us posted on how things go, we are cheering for you!!!:)

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Teresa,

I feel your pain. I purchased my machine in 2004. I have a business line and it never rings. I too am so discouraged that I almost want to sell. I pay personal property taxes on this machine, sales tax to the state, supplies, etc - you know the routine....and no calls. I have done everything too. It makes me sad when I hear that someone wants to purchase a machine...when I should be feeling happy for them. But in the back of my mind I am thinking, "well, there goes more business that I won't be getting." It is very discouraging. I have started really advertising t-shirt quilts. I have to do something to pay off this machine. The problem with the t-shirt quilts is I don't get to freehand and I love the beautiful quilt tops and creativity. I feel like I am whining....I just want you to know that you are not alone...


Mary Beth 

Powered by 2009 Freedom

Future winner of the Millie Sweepstakes

http://marysnutshell.blogspot.com/




 

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Thanks Linda for the suggestion, and thanks Mary Beth for your reply. I know exactly how you are feeling. I just don't want to give up, but it is very disheartening. I will try putting ads in the magazines as Linda suggested and hope that helps.

Teresa


8259635bf834a637a7febcce54170daf.png Sweet T's Custom Quilting Finley, TN  (731)-445-6411 sweet_t_quilting@yahoo.com

 

http://sweettsquilting.blogspot.com

https://www.facebook.com/SweetTsQuilting

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I agree with everything so far, but here's my 2 cents-

I always trim quilts as a courtesy. I ask of course if they would like it done and most say YES!

I have a referral program, and I make sure all new clients know about it. I think it especially helps for those that may use a couple of quilters. If they have my $10 off certificate, they will choose me next time. And usually they have a quilt that will cost well over $100, and I have gotten a new client out of the deal to boot.

I also put a business card sized ad in every program and flier that I can find. I don't do any overkill right in my area, but if there is a guild a couple of towns over, I make sure they see my name and if they run into a problem, I hope they will call me.

Introduce yourself where ever you go as a professional quilter. Here's a good example- I was at the vet's last month, dropping off my dog for a little work. When she asked for the number I could be reached at, I gave her my card. She said her mother quilts, but can't so the hand-quilting anymore. I have gotten 2 tops from her and more are on the way!

Do freebies if you aren't busy, charity quilts, quilts for the church. It helps with practicing new things and gets me out there. If there are ladies in the local church making quilts for charity, there's a good chance they will have tops themselves at some point.

I am definately NOT the best quilter in my area, but I am one of the busiest!

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I'm told that most businesses take 1-2 years or more to get off the ground. I sent a u2u to you, chickenscratch, check it out. I, too, have been told everywhere I go that there is soooooo much business out there. Well, doggonit, some of that is MINE! I have found that things are very slow and I am doing more charity and freebies than I would like, but I just believe that getting my name out there and not giving up will make a difference. I will not falter, I will not fail, I will not give up!


Robin Kinley

Vista, CA

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Yes, I have decided I will not give in also. If nothing else, when this is all said and done, at least I can quilt my own tops. (But for me that is an expensive alternative). My husband flipped his lid this year when we filed our taxes. We didn't make many large ticket purchases so not many deductions. He mentioned pushing the machine off a cliff. But once he recoveded, it was like he was more determined than ever to make this thing work. I want this business to work out so much, and my mind is always working trying to figure out my next move before I make it. I don't even have a web site yet, but it is in the talks. But what if I can't afford it. That is just another expence. I guess this is what all small business owners go through. I'm sure things will work out, just hope I'm around to see it ;)


Mary Beth 

Powered by 2009 Freedom

Future winner of the Millie Sweepstakes

http://marysnutshell.blogspot.com/




 

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To Robin K. : "You go Girl" :cool: I have'nt started my bussiness yet as my Milli.'s not due until May, but I know I will not fail, I can't, I'm to smart, & much tooo! determinded (pig- headed). ;) I also have talent, everyone says my quilts are very well done, & I know that will transfer to La'ing as well. I plan to P.P.P.P. all summer so I will be ready for the Christmas rush, my Guild only has one mid-armer, & one short-armer, & they are only doing it part time, I plan on full time. I have'nt told a sole (at the guild) of my plans yet, I'm Learning that staying low key works best for me (I have a stronge personality). Word will get out in due time. I'm also in charge of our Guild's "Community Quilts", & I've alresdy gotten those lovly & talented Ladies to donate over 100 quilts this year ! !:D They are the best gals you could ever meet. I also have more comm. quilts to practice on, plus all my u.f.o.'s that I have stored away need to be done as well, after I finnish all that I should be really good ;)

One thing I've learned , is that pateince & good (hard) work is always rewarded :)

Hang in there Robin, Sally, Teresa & all


Gerry in Duncan B.C. Canada

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I really don't see how you can justify buying a longarm, needing/wanting more business and then not be able to afford a web page. My web page is hosted by Start Logic. It's $4.95/month for a lot of space. I only use about 3% of my space and about 2% of my bandwidth. When I started out, I didn't have a clue how to do the web page but wanted to learn and while it isn't an award winning web page, it gets the job done. So, after the initial cost of the domain name (which is something like $10/year as I recall), the only expense in maintaining my web page is $4.95/month!

Yes, there are gorgeous web pages and there are people who will do them for $$ but please don't make a decision that you can't afford a web page unless you've exhausted all options.


Judy Laquidara

Brownwood, TX

APQS Millennium

Blog: http://www.patchworktimes.com

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I too just started my web page. It's $20 to register your domain and then I pay $7 a month, but my guy's are great and I talk to them all the time, so I am okay paying an extra buck. I found one place that wanted $150/mo it was ridiculous. Of coarse there is nothing on my site yet as I am fumbling through how to do it. Like everything else it will come with time.


Judy Pryor

Millie/12\'table/hyd-lift

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Thank you Judy, for info about the web page. I contacted a lady about designing, etc and got a quote back of $435 for initial cost and $135 per year after that. Then if she adds new pics, etc, there would be more fees. My brother, who owns a very successful small business, is working with me on a web site. He has assured me, also, that there are people out there that are trying to make a buck, and know that we normal people don't understand all the computer stuff. My brother is designing his own site and works with a web hosting company. I just don't understand all the computer jargon so I could get myself in over my head financially and I can't take that chance. Thank you for sharing your information, I will look into your hosting company. I am a computer nut. I can find anything I want on the internet and then some;) so I should be able to come up with a web site. Thank you for your encouragement.

Have a great day,

Mary Beth


Mary Beth 

Powered by 2009 Freedom

Future winner of the Millie Sweepstakes

http://marysnutshell.blogspot.com/




 

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