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Hi guys!

I'm ordering my mille this week! But was wondering about which table size most of you 'use'. Bigger isn't necessarily always better. What size quilts do you find most of your customers making? Also, do many of you have the hydraulic lift for your tables and if so, how often do you actually use it?

Thanks, this is such a great forum and everyone is always so helpful:)


Charlotte Cushing

Red Hen Quilting

Westminster, CA.

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Hi Charlotte,

Due to space limitations, I got myself a 10' table with my Millie and I'm glad I did. I figured that I wouldn't get too many requests for quilting tops that were larger than Queen size. And if tops were wider, I could always turn them 90 degrees and quilt from one side to the other.

However, since a different size table doesn't affect the price, you could get the maximum size that fits your studio, though...

Originally, I was thinking about getting the hydraulic lift feature because my husband (6'5") mentioned that he would like to try the machine. But then we decided against it as the height can be adjusted manually to suit you - and to the present day, my husband hasn't seriously used the machine.

Just my 2 cents...

Birgit

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I agree, get the biggest you can manage in your space. Mine is 12' because that is all I could fit and so far I haven't had a need for a bigger table but if you can fit it I think you may as well get the 14'. Personally, I don't have a hydraulic lift and have never regretted it.

Sandra


60192E9EE333ED0004E5F971C1156F8B.png

APQS Liberty

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I have a 12' table which is more than adequate for anything I've done. I have a friend with a 14' table who says she wishes she'd gotten the 12', that she has never needed all that extra space and it's a pain to walk around all the time.


BB198D12C35A8D5FD8B47438289F173C.png

Lynn McCartney

APQS Millennium w/Bliss

"Excellence in all things; all things to the glory of God."

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Charlotte, I have a 12' table that has been sufficient for all the quilts I have done the last year. I don't think I even want to do anything that wouldn't fit on it. I have the hydralic lift that I got because I thought others might be using the machine, but have since decided against letting others use it. I could not manage without being able to raise the machine because of my height. Some quilts I have to do more detailed work on and thus adjust the height easily. You could probably manage without it if you are the only one on the machine and can permanently set it for yourself.


Theresa Ford

Nanny T\'s Quilts & Gifts

2816 W 6th Street

Amarillo, Tx 79109

Located on \"Old Route 66\"

APQS Millennium

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Birgit, Sandra, Lynn and nannyt-

Thank you all for your much valued input! It's so great to be able to poll actual users, and see what works best in varied circumstances.

It's a relief to hear a 12 ft table will work just fine. This will leave me more room for cabinets!

anxiously waiting :)


Charlotte Cushing

Red Hen Quilting

Westminster, CA.

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I have a 14' table with a hydraulic lift. I haven't had a quilt that I really needed the 14' table length yet, but I have it if I need it. I do love the hydraulic lift. I use it all the time. I will set the table at a different height if I am using it from either the front or the back. I also raise it when I need to frog. I have a bad back and this helps if I don't have to bend over too far.:)

I wouldn't give up the hydraulic lift for anything!:D


Sue in Scottsdale, AZ

Millennium with CompuQuilter

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I have the 14' and am glad I do. It gives me the option of turning larg quilts and it also gives me a place to park the head off a quilt top at the end of the day.

As far as the lift. I do not have it but my chair adjusts if need be.

I'd say go as large as you have the room for.

G


My Soul is Fed with Needle & Thread

The Stitch Witch ~ APQS sales, service, education & rental studio

tswquilts@aol.com

http://thestitchwitchstudio.blogspot.com

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We have two 10 foot tables that we move around a lot to shows etc. We also have two 14 foot tables. A 12 foot table will probably work on 95+ % of the quilts you will see. We have at times used the whole 14 foot table. We normally suggest the largest table you have room for. Of course you can always order your millie with a 13 foot or a custom size that works for you.


Technician for Country Lane Quilting

KenQuilt and CompuQuilter Sales/Service.

Authorized Hartley Products Dealer.

Website www.countrylanequilting.com

email countrylanequilting@gmail.com

John Cell Phone 816-686-7636

Studio 816-350-2002

Fax 816-350-0030

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Martha...

My Liberty is in a small room...probably approx the same as yours, maybe a bit bigger. I have a 12' table and it sits diagonally in the room. Maybe if you could get the depth of the table you could map it out on the floor to see if this is an option for you! You could possibly go for an 11 or 12' table with it this way, who knows!

Sandra


60192E9EE333ED0004E5F971C1156F8B.png

APQS Liberty

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I got a ten foot table because of space I also got castors to move the table about. It seems to work fine so far I figure the largest size quilt I can do would be 100/102inches. I poured through magazines I never found one bigger than that on both sides, If you can get larger table do so, but, you will be fine if you can't, but I do think the 6 inches would be good to have.

Susan

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Please remember that if you're getting the Millennium or Liberty with the auto fabric advance feed, the motor sticks out another 9". If you have a 14' table, it actually takes up 14' 9" of space.

I've had both a 14' table, and now a 12' table. I only changed the size to be able to put the machine across the width of the room and get another machine in here. I guess you don't miss what you've never had, but I must say that after 3 years, I still miss that extra 2 feet on the 14' table.

My sister has a 10' table in her condo dining room and doesn't even have the extra few inches for the motor mount. She does just fine with it, and uses my machine for the odd King Size quilt she gets.

If you have the space, get the biggest table you can so you don't limit yourself. Everyone gets in the mind set that they'll only quilt "tops", BUT think about how many other types of work there are for our machines! Decorator bedspreads, outlining yardage for upholsterers, horse blankets!, quitled yardage for clothing designers. etc. etc. I had a call a few weeks ago from a fellow who wondered if he could do padded elevator pads on a machine like this. Yes! Just put on the Channel Lock and go for it! LOL But you need the longest table for something like that.

So don't block yourself in! Think outside the box, and you'll come up with many different ways to use your machine.

Another thing to take into consideration? Just because the leaders on a 12' table are 126" long, that does NOT mean you can quilt a quilt that is 126" wide, if you're doing a pantograph pattern on it. Move your machine to the far right side, turn on the laser, adjust it, and measure how far the needle is from the edge of the leader. NOW, move the machine to the left until the laser dot is at the left edge of the table. How far is the needle from the edge of the leaders? Surprise!!! You've just lost at least a foot of quilting space!

The other side of the coin ~ Are you going to live in the space you're in now, forever?! How easy will it be to find another house with a room large enough to accommodate your machine? If you move every few years, you might want to stay with a smaller 10' table.

LOTS of things to think about, and everyone's situation is different. You have to decide what's right for you.

With regards to the hydraulic lift system? If you don't have it, you can't miss it. If you've had it, you'll never again be without it!!!!!!!!!

I used to think it was just another "option" to sell. Since I've had mine, I bless it everytime I push the button to raise or lower it. "Oh my aching back" isn't muttered so much anymore! ;)


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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What is the hydraulic lift? Is it something that can be added, or must be ordered with a new machine. My Mille is 4 yrs old. I have it lifted onto stationary blocks to raise it up, but the correct height for the front, isn't the correct height for the back. Thanks for the info. I will look into it.:) Grace

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Hi Grace,

The hydraulic lift includes a set of legs that attach to the legs of your table. The "hydraulic stuff" is mounted under the top of the table, and you raise and lower the table with the push of a button. It can be added to any of the metal tables.

You say you have your table lifted up on blocks? Are you REALLY tall? All of the legs are adjustable. If yours is 4 years old, you have 2 holes in the "top" or outermost part of the leg, and several holes at intervals on the interior part of the leg. There are bolts that fit through the holes and by removing the bolts, you can reposition the legs to a higher or lower position, lining up to the next or higher hole, and sliding the bolt through again. Is that clear as mud??

This picture may help.

post--13461897674725_thumb.jpg


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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No, I am not real tall, but getting the height right for working both sides of the table is difficult. How do others get it 'right'? Is that the beauty of the hydraulic legs? Grace:o

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Darlene, you referred to both the auto fabric advance and the hydraulic lift. The fabric advance adds 9" to the length of the table? Over the full width? Does the hydraulic lift add to the overall dimensions? Does it prevent you from sliding around the table on either gliders or castors?

Is leveling a real concern if you have the table on castors? I mean, if I run the machine from the front in one location and from the back 6 inches away, will I have to re-level the machine every time?


Marty Provencher

Hearts Delight Quilting Company

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An option to castors would be to use the teflon sliders that are placed under each leg. These sliders are made to move large heavy objects with little effort. It is my understanding that if you use the castors you lose the abilty to adjust the height of your machine as they replace the leg adjustment hardware. Hope this helps.


Sherry Rogers-Harrison

Innova Pro SR 26" with Lightning Stitch and Auto Pilot

http://www.sewfarsewgood.org

mailto:sewfarsewgood@comcast.net

206 412-4720

http://www.facebook.com/people/Sherry-Rogers-harrison/1353418232

 

~you can't hurt your eyesight by looking on the bright side~

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Hi Sherry,

Good to see you here! :)

I think you're right about the castors, but the teflon sliders can be used under ANY leg. They don't affect the adjustability at all. I even have them under my hydraulic lift legs. They worked as well on the carpet as they do on the new laminate wood flooring.

Martha: The motor on the end of the take up roller adds 9" to the total length of the table. The hydraulics don't take up any extra space as the hardware is all mounted underneath the table, and the hydraulic legs attach to the inside of the table legs. I don't believe the hydraulic system would work with the castors as I think the castors would be in the way, but you could ask someone at the plant about that.

You asked if you'd need to level the table each time you moved the machine. If your floor is not level, then the answer is probably yes. I installed one machine in a garage where the floor was VERY uneven. It took us a long time to get the table level, and then she decided to move the machine. We had to start over with leveling. But that was an extreme case.

Grace, you asked about the different heights going from the front to the back of the machine to work. Before I had the hydraulic system, I had 2 pairs of shoes with different heel heights. I changed shoes when I changed sides of the machine. A lot cheaper than hydraulics, but not nearly as much fun! :D


14EABCCA535C11FE692767BF2F0B87E2.png

DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

The POCKET GUIDES to Freehanding

eppd@telus.net

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