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Catherine P.

putting together a quilt

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The sister-in-law of a good friend contacted me today about putting together a quilt for her. She has the blocks pieced and needs the sashing and borders put on then quilted. This a quilt she started in 1991 and she would like to get it finished ? just not by her! I need an idea of what to charge her. I haven?t seen it but if it?s truly ready for sashing and borders it shouldn?t take too long to put together (12 blocks). I?m thinking of quoting her $25.00 - $50.00 to finish the piecing. She?ll probably also need the backing prepared.

Then I would quilt it using my usual fee. What do you think?

Catherine


Catherine P.

Millennium

Nevada, IA

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Is she providing all the materials or would you have to include a bill for the fabric to do the sashing and borders? If she just needs you to assemble it and the blocks are mostly square and the same size then I think $25 would be fair. Just my opinion though.


8259635bf834a637a7febcce54170daf.png Sweet T's Custom Quilting Finley, TN  (731)-445-6411 sweet_t_quilting@yahoo.com

 

http://sweettsquilting.blogspot.com

https://www.facebook.com/SweetTsQuilting

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I'd recommend that you figure out how many hours it will take you to finish the piecing of the quilt. Then figure out how much per hour you think is fair. In my quilting business I figure I need to make about $25 per hour minimum. When a client requests that I piece a quilt or do something extra, I apply that amount per the number of hours it will take. The biggest problem is underestimating the actual time it really takes so be realistic.

I do give discounts to close friends & relatives but remember that this is your business. If it's a gift, then do it for free. If not, then it's business. And I like bartering too, just remember to value your part based on your hourly rate. If it's going to take 2 hours then barter for something that is worth 2 hours of your time. Bartering only works when both parties feel that they made a fair trade.

Just my thoughts, hope they help.

Happy Quilting :D


Jean Weishahn

White Rooster Quilting & Design

APQS Millennium

Elk Grove, CA

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Boy, that was a fast answer..."someone" is still on line...of course it isn't midnight where you're at, right?

Correcto on the figuring the time...I always think I'm going to breeze right thru something and then find little things that

put the kaputz on it...If you don't like the barter thought...

I think I'd do like the above letter...figure you hourly wage and tell the customer, you'll do it for $X amount x whatever time it takes you...you surely don't have to give her a definite price BEFORE you do the work. My husband gives

"estimates" at no charge...but if he says a job is going to

cost $10,000 and it ends up being $11,000...that's what the customer pays...the $11,000. You can tell her you think it'll

run around $30 or whatever, but that it might be a little more

considering you have to cut the sashings, there's some pressing going to have to be done, etc...consider it all...

In this day and age, very few of us can afford to be Santa Claus. I can't anyway....and good luck...hope this turns out just super for you....

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Catherine,

I had an almost identical situation. I told the customer I would charge her $30 to do the sashings and border, and then my usual rate for the quilting. Welllllll, I ended up working for about $1/hour!! Her blocks were not uniform in size. I had to figure out the largest one, and square them all to that size. She had no pattern for her quilt and wanted it to be as large as possible. The backing fabric was also to be used for the sashing and border. I knew what size to cut the sashing strips, but the border was to be "however wide I could make them" with the fabric she had provided. I had to figure out the largest size back I could cut and still have enough fabric for the borders and sashing.

What a learning experience that was! My husband has been a computer consultant for over 20 years. When someone asks him for a hard and fast estimate he always takes his best guess and doubles it. Now I know why!!!


Deanna Shumaker

Anna Banana Designs

Plant City, FL

APQS Millennium

www.annabananadesigns.com

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Catherine,

I ditto what Deanna has said. Things you want to consider which can zap your time are: fabric prep (wash, dry -your machine/electricity resources, press), machine piecing time per hour - (the top. the backing, the binding), general sewing repair time, binding services (fabric prep, machine stitch, turn and sew time), squaring the pieces and blocking - BESIDES the machine quilting. A good way to set your pricing is to look online at other businesses around the nation or in your area - and consider what $ per hour when machine quilting (for the same time involved) and reasonably what your time is worth per hour for what is involved. Estimate what time it would take for all the steps and what your hourly charges are for each - give your quote estimate and see if she still wants you to do the all work. Although a job may "sound" like not much - it can be. Don't sell yourself short, unless you are just feeling "really generous" - remember you don't know who else will expect the same in the future and I would think that you would want to be fair with everyone. If the person declines, at least you haven't given away your time and resources. If this doesn't matter and you want to do it "cheap" then I would recommend you tell her to not share her price for the work with anyone - this was a one time deal.

I struggle with this same issue as my husband is always telling me "quilt giving the business away!" - I am more cognizant of time now and he's right!" ;)

Hope this will help!

Vicki

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Thanks everyone. I?ve got lots of things to think about and really good suggestions. The affirmation of what I?m worth is good, too! I think I?ll quote her a price per hour with a minimum charge. I have a minimum charge for longarming, so I should for this too.

I really appreciate everyone who took time to read my post and those who shared their thoughts. Thank you!

Catherine


Catherine P.

Millennium

Nevada, IA

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