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what kind of machine do you have?

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I visited a Viking store today and was shown a wonderful machine. Problem is it costs $6000.00!! I was wondering what kind of machine others have and what they think of it. True this machine did everything but wow, a lot of money. Thanks. Guess you all saw I'm new to the board.

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I saw the Mega Quilter at a Viking dealer a few weeks. If the machine you was is the same machine, you only have 6" of quilting space on the frame. I have more space on my machine now when I am not using a frame. To me it was definitely not worth the money.

BTW - I just registered with this board yesterday, and am also fairly new to machine quilting. About 1 year, off and on, due to building a house with a room big enough for a longarm machine. Later..


Debbi Prodigy w/ Intelliquilter , A-1 Platinum Elite

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My domestic machines(s) are Bernina -I have two. One was around $700 the other around $2,300.

My Longarm is a Millie. I Love them all!

Cheryl


Cheryl Uribe

Livermore, California ~45 miles east of San Francisco

APQS Representative/Educator

Since 2004

Sales, Demonstrations & Education

www.gizmogirlquilts.com

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I have the TOL Brother which cost me a little over $ 6,000, gulp. What was I thinking. It is an awesome machine that does beautiful embroidery as well as an amazing sewing machine. It even has an 8 " throat area.

But for quilting, I'm still moving the fabric, yuck. I would recommend a low end real quilting machine for "real quilting" you'll be so happy.

I'm looking into that now as well. I had APQS's Mille, awesome, but sold it as I couldn't run my business anymore. But the quilting machines are great IMHO.

Best wishes.

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Dear newbies...me too...I am pestering people with the same questions,

and looking for quilting machines. We've hand-on "driven" several of

the main brands available on the market and have pretty much eliminated 3 of them for one reason or another. Although they all seemed like good machines for many people.

If you can talk to a machine repairman about which machine to buy and

a professional-type machine vs. a domestic machine on a quilting frame,

that might help you decide which to get.

Try nolting@nolting.com and www.apqs.com and protostitchwizard.com

There is also A-1 brand, Gammill brand and the KenQuilt brand, and I don't have their computer addresses handy, but know you can look them up.

Ask ea. about used machines, etc. You might find a really durable machine

for a reasonable price...good luck. ML

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Guest Linda S

My longarm is a Liberty. For DSMs, I have a Singer Featherweight, a Willcox & Gibbs Silent Automatic Chain Stitch Machine, and a Bernina 153QE. In my opinion, if you want a really great DSM and don't want the embroidery module, buy the Bernina 153QE. Just about every feature you could want - needle up/down, walking foot standard, hands-free presser foot lifter, mirror image, tons of stitches, an alphabet, 3 (I think) different kinds of button holes, memory, table extender, needle threader (what would I do without this?), and more. You can just about throw the fabric at it and it sews by itself. Wait till football season starts - Bernina always has a sale then. I think mine cost somewhere around $2000.

Linda

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She showed me the mega quilter, no interest from me. She then showed me the designer SE and she demonstrated it. it was fabulous. For 6000.00 you get this machine and a huskylock serger. The sale is good until 8/27. She had last years model available, was used for one quilt show for less tha 4000.00, no serger. I am confused. They supply all the lessons you need at your convenience, which was something I thought was very good. It still is a lot of money. I am confused------. Thanks for all your replies.

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I forgot to add that I have a Viking Quilt Designer. I believe this was replaced with the Designer I. It is a wonderful machine and does everything you would want to do for quilting. It does not do embroidery. You can buy a quilting kit for it that has the free motion foot, quilting table and a few other accessories. I've had it for 2 years with no problems whatsoever. It cost about $2500.


Debbi Prodigy w/ Intelliquilter , A-1 Platinum Elite

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If you want to machine quilt, GET A LONGARM. I cannot stress this enough. DSMs are great for what they are designed to do, but unless the only thing that you are quilting is placemats, GET A LONGARM. I have a Millennium and I LOVE IT. I also have four Berninas and a Juki and love them all, but I do not quilt with them.

Cathy in NC

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Where shall I start? I have way too many machines! Before my Liberty I quilted with my Singer 20U or my Viking 1100. For piecing I use my Singer 301 and my 1880's Domestic treadle. I recently purchase a Viking Rose with embriodery module at a shop that was going out of business, couldn't pass up the great deal, but I have yet to really sew on it:( Who has time? Especailly with my Liberty calling,lol.


My Soul is Fed with Needle & Thread

The Stitch Witch ~ APQS sales, service, education & rental studio

tswquilts@aol.com

http://thestitchwitchstudio.blogspot.com

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I own a Pfaff Quiltstyle (my eldest), Bernina 200e which I only use for embroidery. Somehow I can not get used sewing with her. And Bernina 440 QE. Which I love as she has the BSR. You can slow down the motor easily and she is realy quiet.


andrea, dancing with my Millie

~~~~~~~~~~~~

www.quilten.ch

webshots: http://community.webshots.com/user/quilten_ch

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I started on a machine that I got mail-order 28 years ago. ($150). Yes, I still have it. It is a Janome. I have to laugh when I look at the stitch dial and see "tricot" and some other oldy fabric. But it still runs.

I have a Bernina 153 ($2200), which I love. But shoving a quilt thru that 7" throat takes all the fun out of quilting.

I did a lot of research, like you. I just made a list of what features are important to me. For my Bernina, the needle up/down was top of my list.

So when I started thinking about a longarm, the throat size was the most important thing to me. 26" x 10". I think my first apartment was smaller than that! I saw the Liberty in the Fons & Porter magazine and fell in love.

I think those go for about $10k but you can add several goodies (thread cutter, etc) that can drive the price up $2-3k more. That is a big commitment for a hobby-quilter like me. I want to make sure I even like a longarm before I spend that kind of $. Oh, I should point out that the Gammill high end machine ($15k) really did cost more than my first house. Yikes.

So I started looking for a used one. That can be a scary experience. I found one locally on www.craigslist.com, unbelieveable price and snapped it up. I have had to rely on the talent and great service at APQS to bring the machine up to operational but I have learned some good stuff in the process. I have also gotten great info and encouragement right here on the APQS quiltboard forum. Used APQS machines, call 1-800-426-7233. Links to used machines can be found at http://www.houseofhanson.com/longarm.html but hint, turn off your computer's speakers first...

Don't get discouraged. Make a list of what is important and go from there.

Good luck.


Linda Card

APQS Chat Member since August 2005

Ramona Quilter Longarm Quilting Service (Retired Dec 2013)
Gammill Optimum Plus (sold to a friend Dec 2013)
Ramona, CA (Moved to Central Texas Sep 2014)

My webshots site: http://community.webshots.com/user/legcard (not active)
Blog site: http://ramona-quilter-big-dream.blogspot.com/ (not updated in months)

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. Philippians 4:13

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I am so glad I'm not the only "machine collector". At this point I have (in order of age) a turn of the century (19th-20th) treddle machine, an Eldridge Rotary (1915 but waiting for the doctor) a 1928 singer portable I use for classes (not a featherweight :(), my grandmother's Nelco (circa 1963) I use for piecing, a Singer Futura for embroidery and fancy stitches and my new APQS Freedom. My husband thinks I am nuts, but each has it's strengths and weaknesses (Just like the rest of us I guess)


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Leslie McSorley
The Crafty Unicorn Quilting
Harrington, Maine
APQS Freedom
www.TheCraftyUnicorn.com

Don't tell me not to burn the candle at both ends... Tell me where to get more wax!

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Vikings are great machines. I use a Viking Quilt Designer for all my piecing and my husband uses a 1950 Centennial Featherweight for all of his piecing. When it comes to the quilting - we us a Millennium - and wouldn't use anything else!!

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I have a Millenium for quilting. An old 60's New Home straight stitch workhorse for piecing that I bought for $15.00 at a garage sale -- my 6 year old machine with all the goodies cillects dust. A little Janome Gem for classes etc.

Then there are my 2 vintage Singers.


JUST QUILTING

APQS SALES & SERVICE

Fil-Tec / Glide Distributor

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Received my Liberty a couple weeks ago. We are still getting acquainted. I have a Lily 550 Viking and a Designer I Viking. Love them both, but the sensor foot on the Designer is fantastic. No more reaching around to lift the foot. It works great for applique. I was just going to use it for embroidery and piece on my Lily, but once I got spoiled by the sensor foot the poor little Lily sits in the corner. But it's nice to have a backup which I needed not long ago. :) I had planned to sell it, but glad I didn't. Started out with an old used machine and just kept working my way up. Doubt if I will ever get any more machines. Learning how to use my Liberty will keep me plenty busy.


Diane in SD

Liberty \"Belle\"

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This is fun! I have a 1981 Viking 6570, had to have a new cam holder put in it 2001, and it still sews great. It's my extra machine.

I bought a Janome memory craft 6500 Pro; thread cutter, knee lifter, needle up/down, it's fast. It has the largest throat for quilting, too. It sews letters which I use to make quilt labels. I love it and it was only $1200. Now I think I'll get the Janome embroidery machine.

I have a Pfaff serger and 9 Singer featherweights. My granddaughters will get these eventually. They learned to sew on them.

I retired in 2000 and bought my Millinium in 2001. I absolutely love it... a little intiminating at first, but I went to Brookings and took a workshop from Merilyn Badger.

She helped me so much.

When we set up Milli and made it my sewing room in the basement, my grandson looked around and said," Does this mean we won't be having Christmas Eve down here, Gran?"

Well, we still have Christmas but not in the sewing room.

Happy sewing everybody! Evelyn


Evelyn

APQS Milli

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I bought an APQS Millennium last December after seeing a demo at the Houston Quilt Festival and I am very happy with it. For my sewing I mostly use a Bernina which can do some embroidery. I also own to Featherweights and a 14-year-old Pfaff which sews like a dream. I love them all and use them all. I am still building quilting skills on the Millennium, there definitely is a learning curve, but I have started quilting for customers. It has been my experience that adjusting tensions differently for all the types of threads to result in good stitches is the most frustrating part, but it is getting somewhat easier than in the beginning. The only hands-on teaching that I have had was when the guys who came to do the in-home set-up gave me the basics. Eventually I would like to schedule some classes both at APQS and longarm quilt expos, but in the meantime I have purchased some DVD's of Linda Taylor and Pam Clarke that are very good and a few books. I am lucky to have two friends who own longarm machines who have shared great info with me.

Connie W

APQS Millennium :)


Connie

central Illinois

2009 Millie with Bliss

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Sorry.............I mis-spelled "two". I also failed to add that my Millie resides in the dining room.......the dining table got demoted to the family room. The dining room now is used on a regular basis as opposed to only during the Christmas holidays when the table was in there. :D

Connie W

APQS Millennium


Connie

central Illinois

2009 Millie with Bliss

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When my daughter was a baby (22 years ago) my husband surprised me with a Kenmore sewing machine for Christmas. You cannot believe how happy I was. I had been borrowing my sister's machine the previous year to sew my maternity clothes and now I had my very own machine! I think it had 14 different stitches. I used that machine for the next 19 years until I had to send it off for a minor repair. (it would not stitch in reverse)

While my machine was away, one of my friends began persuading me I should have a Husqvarna Designer I like she had. Her machine was very nice, and I thought I could do a lot more with it than with my Kenmore, once it came back from the shop. So, I bought the Designer I and intended to keep the old reliable Kenmore as a backup machine. Besides, the Kenmore had sentimental value. I still remember how surprised I was that Christmas morning so long ago.

When my Kenmore came back from repair it was extremely damaged. I think they shipped it under a refrigerator all the way from Tampa to Chattanooga. Sears had to replace it. Even though the Kenmore was so damaged, I did not want to part with it because of the sentimental value....but I did. (sigh)

I now had 2 new machines to learn at the same time. I have mainly used the Husqvarna ever since. It is SO much nicer than the Kenmore even though there is nothing wrong with the Kenmore. My sisters came from out of state for "quilt fest" at my house last week. I had to laugh. They both thought my Kenmore machine was a Cadillac compared to their machines at home. (One sister still has the machine I sewed my maternity clothes on.) I think the Husqvarna is my "Cadillac". It is all a matter of perspective I guess!

Then there is "Princess Stitchy" my Millenium. Talk about a "Cadillac"......:D


Deanna Shumaker

Anna Banana Designs

Plant City, FL

APQS Millennium

www.annabananadesigns.com

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What a fun topic

A little over 10 years ago I bought my 1120 Bernina, used, for $1200. Gulp! But I love her and she is a work horse. I also have an Ultimate I for quilting.

Two weeks ago a elderly friend gave me her embroidary machine which I have not used yet. It is a Janome Newhome. It has a scanner and everything. I've been too busy to play but can't wait. I also have 2 old Singers that I picked up at a swap meet and a thrift store. I don't use them or plan on it -- I just like them because they are old.

Happy quilting!

Ema

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Well yesterday, after talking to hubby, I made the big purchase. I bought the Viking Designer SE and got a free Viking Huskeylock. A total of 7,000.00. What a hoot, my husband started guessing the price at $300.00!! When I told him the price he said, "go get it". I spent some time with it today and I think I made a good decision. I will get some classes in a few weeks and will let you know how thrilled I am after that.

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I can not believe the price differences in machines. Sewing machines are all for sewing. Longarms are for quilting. Midarms are quilting too.

Why in the world would you spend so much money on a sewing machine that is not a longarm. I still have my machine (kenmore $150.00) that I got 35 yrs old and still is the best of all as far as reliable. Quilt work is sewing patches together. Now Embroidery machines is a different breed if you got the real thing with hoops and plenty of designs. I am still using Kenmores and Singers. Always been reliable for a long, long, long. time. But am thinking of purchasing a embroidery machines for small quilting designs.

I guess I like it like KISS(keep it short and simple).lol Nita


0904BB851369B02D94166B5DF476CC78.png

www.henhousemachinequilting.com

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