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AnnHenry

Blue marking pen

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Having read another thread about marking tools, I am surprised to learn that there are so many markers out there. I don't see much about the blue wash-out pen which I have use exclusively. In fact, I recently finished a 15-year-old UFO that had some markings in blue pen, and they all washed out without problem, and I was delightedly amazed.

I always pre-wash all my fabrics with Shaklee Basic H and Fresh Laundry (used to be Basic L), but the blue pen lines are removed with just spritzing.

Because this blue pen works so well for me, I am wondering what there is about it that others don't like to the point that they are searching for, and manufacturers are creating, so very, very many other markers. Am I missing something?

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No you really aren't missing something...its just like the saying....Always looking for a better mouse trap.

The blue pen was pretty much my marking tool of choice since I moved to the east coast or a white chalk pencil for darker fabrics. But since also putting in the extremely hot halogen lights in my studio, my ceiling is only 7 foot tall...and the lights hang down so are only about 30 inches from the quilt....the blue pen is now OUT and I won't be using it any longer...so hense my hunt for the better mouse trap.

You got lucky with your blue pen....if they set too long in fabric I have had them turn brown as well....but that was more than likely that they got hot. The sun will set the blue pen and leave brown marks, so I always tell my customers to get them home as fast as possible get them bound and into the washer. Sunlight, direct light from the window, heat of ANY sort will do it. My studio is now not only hot because of the lights, but very bright...double whammy for me.

The blue pens are great, but you just need to know the draw back of them and then you can make your choice of what and how to use them....the baking soda thing works wonders, but if you have already baked the blue markers into your quilt with bright lights and heat like I did....NOTHING will help it...so I will be using something else from now on.

Because of that...the hunt is pretty limited....one pen might work, but won't come out in water, so why use that one...another pen will work, but you have to erase as you go...okay I don't have time for that...and even another might or might not work depending on the humidity that day....Also I need a very fine point for ruler work...not all pens or pencils will give me that...one might have a great fine point and work great on paper, but the rough fabrics continue to break the leads or they wear down to fast and you start out with a fine point, but within three strokes you have to resharpen or the lead has caught and broken off.....hense another hunt to find that.... so this is really why people more than anything are continuing a hunt for a better mouse trap...its a personal thing more than a practical thing....if the blue pens work for you and you haven't any need for something else great. Your hunt is over...lucky you.;)

As you get to doing customer quilts...you will find some that will NOT LET YOU mark...or at least not mark where they can see that you have....hense black light chalks or markers....or disappearing markers....or plan ol chalk board chalks..... or you had better get really good at freehand.....

So you see its a personal need or a demand if you will to achieve whatever your requirements are at the time....;) Not a demand from those on the chat list...its totally personal....and I thought others might be looking as I continue to do... so shared.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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It is my understanding the blue marking pens aren't made with the same formula as in previous years. I avoid them unless trying something out on a muslin practice piece.


Gayle Jackson

Free Spirit Quilting

Kingsburg CA

peachfarmer@sbcglobal.net

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They may have changed the formula...but I don't think so.....heat and direct sunlight has always set the marks. But to be honest most people didn't wash after quilting, they would just gently spritz the marks making them go down inside the fabrics. They thought that they were removing them,but they were only making the top layer clean, and that is what they thought was setting the marks....the marks would actually just set there and sometimes come back to the surface...and the sun or heat of the heaters would set them and make the brown marks.

As long as you remove the marks as soon as possible, in a lot of plain water...no soap, and keep them from sunlight, direct light and now halogen lights...you should never have a problem with them.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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When Karen McTavish uses the blue marker to mark her wholecloths and makes a marking mistake (hard to believe, I know!) she uses the Clover remover pens and runs them over the marks--they disappear and it dries so quickly you can re-mark the same area in a few minutes. The pens are fairly pricey and sometimes hard to find. If you spritz, you cannot easily control the spray, will over shoot and lose more of the design than you want to. And it will take way more than a few minutes to dry.

What I'm working up to is DON'T SPRITZ. That is what pushes the blue marking chemicals under the fabric and into the batting to magically reappear at a later date. Use a slightly damp clean sponge and gently wipe the marks away.

Or (drumroll here please!!) go to Wally World or Toys-R-Us and purchase a replacement water pen from a toy called AquaDoodle. Two pens in a pack are about $5. They have a tough fibrous tip and a tiny reservoir for the water. They dispense the clean water in a narrow line and this is all I ever use for blue marks until I have finished stitching. Filling is a pain so I keep a tiny glass on my table and replenish it with clean water for every new quilt. The pen sits in about a quarter inch of water and is ready to go.

****Please read this--This tip came from Sherry Roger-Harrison a couple of years ago and I bless her every time I use this "tool". Thanks Sherry!*****

After completing the stitching, I do spritz for safety's sake and remind the customer to do a full treatment at home. So far-so good!

And Bonnie--thank you for the marking pencil information recently. What a great friend to share all this with us. You are the BEST!


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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