Sign in to follow this  
quinceandquilt

Price to Charge for Making Custom Quilt

Recommended Posts

Hi there:

This is my first post. My long-armer suggested I ask this question here.

I've been asked by someone to make them a quilt (or several) and I have no clue how much to charge.

For the sake of discussion, let's assume the following:

1. finished quilt about 70" X 90"

2. difficulty level 2 out of 1-5

3. cost of materials say $200

4. what I will pay the longarmer say $150 (until I'm good enough to do it myself)

5. Labor? I'd say minimum 100 hours.

How much do you think I should charge. Note that this person can pay any amount and is willing to pay any amount. I don't want to gouge him, but I'm not going to work for $1/hour either......

I'd love to hear some different opinions. Someone from Arkansas I know said she knows women who would do it for 500-600$, but I wouldn't do it for that price.

Thanks,

Cynthia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cynthia you need to decide how much you want to make an hour and then price it accordingly. Don't sell yourself short. 100 hours sounds like a high estimate for that size but since I don't know the pattern you're using I could be way off. For a 2 I'm guessing it is just simple straight lines and bigger blocks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

$100 per square yard for piecing. 70 x 90 = 6300. Divided by 1296= 4.86 square yards. Charge $500 for fabric shopping, cutting, and piecing. Charge full retail for batting even if you get it discounted (covers your drive time/inconvenience).

$500 for piecing

$200 for fabric

$25 for batting (W&W two yards at 94" and $12.99 a yard.

$150 for quilting.

$75 for binding (machine sewn on front and hand-sewn to the back.)

Looks like $950.

At $500 for the piecing, you will only be making $5 an hour if it takes 100 hours. Raise the price or find a way to shorten the piecing hours. I know--easier said than done!:o


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Cynthia,

100 hours? For piecing one top with a difficulty level of around 2? That seems high to me.

I make a number of commission quilts and basically price them out as follows...cost of materials and pre-washing fabric and shrinking batting, cost of labour for piecing, cost of longarm quilting, cost for applying binding. Get a quote from your longarmer before giving your customer a price so you know what that cost will be. I have a form my clients sign with everything laid out, such as deposits, fabric colours, quilting design, etc, etc. I get 1/3 payment upon acceptance of quote, 1/3 before the quilt gets longarm quilted (goes on my frame) and the final payment when the quilt is picked up. The last commission quilt I made was Eleanor Burns Underground Railroad (60" x 90"), took me 28 hours to piece and apply binding to the back by hand. I base my quote/prices on about $25 per square foot.

Hope this helps.


Nadia Wilson
Nadia Wilson Designs
Longarm Quilting Service
APQS Sales Rep
British Columbia, Canada
Vancouver Island

E-mail
Text or phone at 250-902-9701


www.nadiawilsondesigns.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow thank you so much for explaining it like that.

So I guess the only thing that would change is the $/sq. yd depending on the difficulty factor......so what would you suggest for a difficult level of 3/5 or 4/5?

I think about $1000 is reasonable and about what I was thinking intuitively without an equation. I don't think 100 hrs is an unrealistic estimate--I know I spend a lot of time arranging and rearranging patterns and colors; everything I make is very bright and scrappy.....I don't think I'm a fast piecer either, kind of slow and steady like a diesel truck. ;o).

I'm so grateful to get replies so fast!

Cynthia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Originally posted by Nadia Wilson

Hi Cynthia,

100 hours? For piecing one top with a difficulty level of around 2? That seems high to me.

I make a number of commission quilts and basically price them out as follows...cost of materials and pre-washing fabric and shrinking batting, cost of labour for piecing, cost of longarm quilting, cost for applying binding. Get a quote from your longarmer before giving your customer a price so you know what that cost will be. I have a form my clients sign with everything laid out, such as deposits, fabric colours, quilting design, etc, etc. I get 1/3 payment upon acceptance of quote, 1/3 before the quilt gets longarm quilted (goes on my frame) and the final payment when the quilt is picked up. The last commission quilt I made was Eleanor Burns Underground Railroad (60" x 90"), took me 28 hours to piece and apply binding to the back by hand. I base my quote/prices on about $25 per square foot.

Hope this helps.

So Nadia, based on your evaluation, what final number did you arrive at?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I charge $50/hr and up for custom quilt design and/or quit pieceing/applique, or quilt repair. Then the quilting is by the density and complexity of quilting. The cost of batting is added in as well as the fabrics for the top and bottom. I also machine bind the quilts at $25-$75. I've made several quilts custom and they are special. Prices are usually no less than $800 for a twin. Your's might run as much as $1200 or more.


1F6CA5955DF121CC55971D0D9BDA7E0F.png

APQS Representative for Federal Way, WA

klwheeler@yahoo.com

510-386-4156

www.feathersandloops.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I do commission quilts, I estimate the degree of difficulty, then I start with these guidelines I made for myself:

beginner/big blocks, $10 per square ft

intermediate $15 per square ft.

advanced applique $25 per sq. ft.

Corey


8E0E35981D02CAFC132FF6C4CC79AB40.png

Corey Starkey

IQ & Bllissed Millennium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am making a custom signature quilt which will have about 60 signatures, queen size, with a (hopefully) simple appliqued butterfly in the center. The pattern is two half-square triangles with the signature obliquely through the block. The applique was thrown at me after I quoted the price, but I'm doing it anyway. I quoted $2,000 for everything from start to finish, and she agreed. I helped her choose the fabric; she paid for it. I don't know how many hours it will take, but I figure that I'd be making a quilt this summer anyhow, and this way I'll get paid for it.


Marilyn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with everyone above! I usually start out for a simple queen size around $1200 and it goes up depending on the difficulty (thus more time) of the pattern. I've had people ask me if I was using gold plated thread! When I break down the costs of fabric, quilting, binding, etc., subtract that from the total and estimate the hours of piecing, they understand it isn't gouging them at all. Then I ask them if they would work for that amount per hour. That really gets them.

I've even had someone say they could go buy a "bed in a bag" at Sears for $70 on sale. I tell them to go right ahead and buy it. I can't even begin to get the fabric alone for that. They'll wash it once and give it to a charity if it isn't in pieces. If they don't sew, they have no idea what it takes to complete a quilt, all the time and effort. They recognise the difference in quality and want the better quilt, but are shocked at the price. I tell them there's a huge difference between a chinese bed in a bag vs. handcrafted quality work. If they don't want to pay, fine with me. I have plenty of customers with quilt tops to quilt so I'd rather quilt and get paid!


Merry Jo

Merry Jo Rembold, Julian, CA

APQS Sales Representative

Millie & Quilt Path

Facebook: Creative Quilting by Merry Jo

Merryjorembold.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I do a charity quilt and want to figure out a cost to claim I basically start at $20/hour plus all costs. It is amazing what one can get done in an hour when you are actually keeping track. And I figure that my time is worth at least that much per hour.


Mitzi Piepho

Millennium

Lakeville, MN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this