Leida Glez

Batting with or without scrim

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I am in now way shape or form an expert in this subject area, but I have had no difficulty with quilting with batting with scrim.  I just try to remember to put the scrim to the back.  Though I have not found it to cause any issues when at times I flip the quilt over and quilt from the backside on blocks/areas that I can not mark well on the front side.  I just finished a quilt where I used two layers of batting, in that I put the scrim sides together.  I do not know if this was/is correct, but it quilted up nicely if I say so myself.  

 

Scrim is the layer that holds the batting together.  If you are going to use scrim-less batting you may need to quilt more closely together so the batting does not separate when the quilt is washed per a quick internet search.  Maybe some other more insightful quilters can provide a better response to your question.

 

Merry Christmas and balanced threads.

 

Cagey


May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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For longarming, batting with scrim is the best. The scrim allows tugging and adjusting of the batting without tearing a hole or causing bunching. Cotton batts usually have a thin poly "film" in the center and the fibers are needlepunched through the film to stabilize the fibers and give an even layer. Your package of cotton batting may say 100% cotton but if you read the fine print it will add 3% polyester---which is the scrim layer. Poly batting may have a "glaze" or chemical scrim on one side. That's the side that lays against the backer and you can feel it.  I don't accept non-scrimmed batting from my customers and have a sign posted stating which battings are not acceptable on the longarm. You'll learn which types you love and which you like to stay away from.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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Linda:

 

When you use two layers of batting, how do you put them together; both scrim down, scrim sides together?

 

One more question, if you accidentally put the scrim side up, does in simply make your quilting pop more on the back side verses the front?

 

Thank you in advance.

 

Cagey


May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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The only area that's crucial is between the backer and the batting next to it, so I make sure the bottom batting is properly positioned. Your pieces are more prone to the dreaded batting pokies if the batting is wrong side up. That's why with cotton batting you want the needlepunched holes in the batt to be going the same direction as your machine needle---from top to bottom. The needlepunching aligns the cotton fibers and if you stitch against the "grain" you'll catch small bits of batting with the high-speed needle and poke them out the back.  

Chemical scrims will be next to the backer to stop and contain batting bits that might want to punch through the backer and appear outside the fabric. Been there-done that way to many times and now I check very carefully when the batting is laid onto the backer. As for double batts, most quilters use cotton against the backer and either wool or poly on top. The cotton stabilizes the piece and adds weight so it hangs well. The wool or poly give great definition to your quilting and poofs even with dense stitching. So the cotton batting needs to be placed correctly, though I place each of them as if I were using only one, just to be safe. Usually wool is my top batting on doubles, and the brand I use is even and has a "finished" feel on both sides so I can't tell them apart. If there is a difference, I put the finished-feeling side down.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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I'm looking battings with scrim, and I read that the "warm company" and "Quilters Dream", specify that no glue or scrim.

The only one I see you have scrim is "Simple Sew".
What other battings have scrim?

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Which products by name are you referring to? Both companies make battings with scrim. Their websites both have details for each of their products.


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APQS Millenium in

Spring Creek, NV

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Linda:

 

Thank you for the detailed explanation.  Would you mind sharing which wool batting brand you use.  Thank you.

 

Cagey

 

 

My favorite wool brand is Hobbs Tuscany. It seems to have a glaze on both sides and is wonderfully even throughout. The Hobbs Heirloom wool seems to have more inconsistencies in thickness. I've used Dream Wool with good results as well.


Linda Rech

Finely Finished Quilts

Millennium on Bliss rails--hand-guided

http://www.topperquilttools.com

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Which products by name are you referring to? Both companies make battings with scrim. Their websites both have details for each of their products.

I have some samples "quilters batting dream" and read:
"No scrim, glues, or resins".
I was wrong on "the warm Company" it has scrim.

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