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Hobbs 80/20 Hard to handle

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Linda,

I have used the medium weight of QD...both the poly and the cotton. I like the way they handle because they don't stretch out of shape as easily as the thinnest loft. I still prefer hobbs 80/20, hobbs heirloom and warm 'n natural the best...I don't care for the hobbs 80/20 out of the bag, but on the roll it has been good.

The batting I dislike the most is Mountain Mist and Joann Crafty 'n quilt batt (it is the one with the yellow label...yuck and double yuck). If another customer brings me the Joann's batt...she will be taking it back...thankfully, I have only had one and one was enough.

Cheryl Mathre

Stone Creek Quilting

Sandy Hook, VA:)


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I too prefer Hobbs 80/20 and have for years! It is just thick enough to make a nice quilt. Warm and Natural makes a quilt soooooo heavy and I hate that, when you already have alot of fabric and thread in a quilt you need a lighter batting. I too buy it off the roll, the steamer idea would be great to get the creases out of the bagged stuff. Linda, try it off the roll, you will love it!

Cher

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Jeri,

Why do you dislike Morning Glory so much....its almost exactly the same as the thinner Dream Cotton. I have quilts with both and if I didn't tell you which was which, you would never know....The Morning Glory can be stitched out 10 inches where the Dream Cotton I believe suggests 8...they wash up the same and they quilt exactly the same.

The only difference that I have experienced is that the scrim on the Morning Glory is just a tad thicker.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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Bonnie, I've never seen their cotton batts and with my experience with the polys I don't think I want to. The Morning Glory batts that I've dealt with are the polys from Wal*Mart. The low loft simplly falls apart hanging over the machine and is so uneven that parts of the quilt had almost no batting. The high loft is horribly stiff and course that I had to use Perma-Core thread as it shredded everything else---not my choice for thread on a very detailed custom quilt with lots of SD and tiny background filler I would have preferred a much thinner thread--I usually use 50 wt for that type of heavy quilting. It dulled to the thumping stage 12 needles on a queen size quilt. There was absolutely no give to it so with all the detail I ended up with puckers here and there on the back that no matter what I did I could not totally get rid of them (I can't stand puckers on the quilts that I do). What a headache--I spent an extra 40 hours on the quilt due to the problems..I had actually quilted an identicale quilt with the same quilting plan using Hobbs 80/20 before I did this one with no problems.


JUST QUILTING

APQS SALES & SERVICE

Fil-Tec / Glide Distributor

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I'm sorry I thought you were refering to the cotton batting...I agree the poly wouldn't be a medium that I would use for your detailed heirloom quilting...but for the traditional quilter its fine.

When they changed their name to Morning Glory from the original format of Create-a-Craft (same company) they did do something to the poly battings that did make it a little less usable, and I agree its not one that I would use for the tiny details that heirloom quilter use. However its a great batting for a childs quilt...its almost indestructible and won't bunch up with the manhandling a child gives a quilt.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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My favorite battings and the reasons why are:

(1) Quilters Dream Cotton Select. There are four weights. I find the Request weight a little too fragile for the longarm but I have used it successfully. I also like the Deluxe ok for a heavier weight quilt and the Supreme is a great batting, but just a little heavy for my preference.

The Select is light weight and very flat. Quilters Dream batts are always perfect! I've never ever had a problem with them. In fact, I've often purchased their "seconds" for donation work and have never found them to be less than perfect either.

(2) Warm & Natural. It is a bit heavier but nice and flat and wall hangings seem to stay so square with W&N. For pantos or overalls, I love this and use it for most of my own bed quilts now. For show quilts, it does get heavy with the tons of quilting but it always hangs so flat. I don't usually do tons and tons of quilting on tops that will be used for bed or snuggle quilts but I would not use W&N in that situation.

(3) Mountain Mist Rose. This is a very flat, soft batting. It comes in cream or white and I've found it to be comparable to Quilters Dream Select. Hobby Lobby does carry it in packages and they have a 40% off coupon often. Customers bring it to me on a regular basis and I've even used it in some of my own quilts.

As far as Hobbs, I do love the weight and poof of the Heirloom 80/20. I love the weight of the Heirloom 100% cotton. Since many of you are not seeing problems with their quality, hopefully it has improved. For probably 10 years I heard of others having problems with Hobbs batting and I had not experienced any problems. The last time I ordered from them, I ordered 9 rolls and at least half of those rolls had problems. They weren't necessarily BIG problems, but they were very far from being perfect and I had a lot of wasted batting. Maybe one day I'll try them again but for now, it's mainly Quilters Dream or Warm & Natural for me.


Judy Laquidara

Brownwood, TX

APQS Millennium

Blog: http://www.patchworktimes.com

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Mary Beth:

I do very few baby/children's quilts and when I do them, I advise the clients about the flame retardant batting but most have not used flame retardant fabrics in their quilts. For those who are using the quilts for actual coverings for babies or small children, I advise them to get the flame retardant batting but I don't do enough of them to make it worth my money to stock the batting.

Almost all my clients (including myself) prefer cotton battings.


Judy Laquidara

Brownwood, TX

APQS Millennium

Blog: http://www.patchworktimes.com

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Thank you Judy. When I was waiting for my machine to arrive another quilter told me about Dream Blend. I have not tried the Cotton, but since I am about out of the Blend I'm going to order the cotton and see how I like that. Thanks for your input.


Mary Beth 

Powered by 2009 Freedom

Future winner of the Millie Sweepstakes

http://marysnutshell.blogspot.com/




 

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I just got a sample of batting from Mountain Mist called Mountain Mist Gold. It is 50 poly/50 cotton...it seems harsh to the touch and somewhat stiff. I was given a free queen size batt. Apparently it is somewhat new to the market...has anyone quilted on it? Do I dare use it? I also receive samples of all of the batts with descriptions...these are 4 inch squares...I find all the cotton ones have little lumps in them that look like a sweater that has pilled. I am not impressed at all. Some of these are blends of 5%silk?95% cotton or 95% cotton/5 %wool or 95% poly/5% wool...what difference would 5% make in a batt? I can't see any benfit except marketing a product. Do you know?

Cheryl Mathre

Stone Creek Quilting

Sandy Hook, VA


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I buy it by the roll... I use it all of the time and I am very hapy with HObbs 80/20. I also use Warm and Natural. I think both of them are keepers.

I do not accept package batting from my customers. I provide the batting as part of the price. So far it has worked out great.

Good luck


Barb Wetzel

Ivy Corner Quilting

Altoona, Iowa 50009

515-967-0613

Retired and I love it!!

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Bonnie, I wouldn't accept Create a Craft either. Didn't realize they were the same company. I also won't use a poly for a child's quilt due to the possible suffocation danger. I recommend either 100% cotton or Quilter's Dream's Dream Angel for children's quilts. Guess that every one has their likes and dislikes. jeri


JUST QUILTING

APQS SALES & SERVICE

Fil-Tec / Glide Distributor

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Barb,

That is an interesting way of providing batting...how do you work the price in the cost of quilting? Do you state that you provide the batting on your customer info sheets and the price? What if the customer doesn't want either of the choices you offer...how do you handle that problem or is it a problem? Don't the quilt stores frown some because part of their sales is from batting?

Just curious...

Cheryl Mathre

Stone Creek Quiltilng

Sandy Hook, VA


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Cheryl,

I for one would make suggestions of what I liked to use, but highly recommended that the customer bring me their battings of choice. Mostly because I didn't have a place to store battings and didn't want the inventory just sitting there, but mostly I was working closely with a store and they handled battings so why would I want to interput that flow.

I have used just about everything out there and yes, some I would refuse, but I also felt that I wasn't the quilt batting police and shouldn't have control of someones budget and if they could only afford the lower end, yet stable battings, I wouldn't dream of refusing them that.

Only the battings that I knew were way to thick for my machine, would either fall apart while I was quilting them, or would bunch badly when washed were the ones refused....And I always very nicely explained to them why and I would help them find another application of use for that batting. I would never had dreamed to tell a customer that a poly batting wasn't as good as a 100% cotton if that customer was really set on using a poly batting.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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I've used Hobb's 80/20 almost exclusively for 9 years now. I've never had room to store bolts so have always used the packaged batts. My trick for getting the wrinkles out and softening the batting is to open it up and then put it in the dryer with a wrung out WET washcloth and a Bounce dryer sheet for about 5 minutes, on regular heat.

To pre-shrink the batting, just soak it in warm water in your washing machine for about 15 minutes (even over night won't hurt it!) and then extract the water, using the end of the rinse cycle (DO NOT agitate). I then shake it out a bit and put in the dryer with a dryer sheet. It comes out very nice and soft with no wrinkles.

I occasionally try other brands, but always go back to the 80/20, or the Hobb's Bleached Cotton if the quilt is pure white.


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DIGITIZED Designs for Computerized Quilting

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Bonnie, I'm curious as to what batting is too thick for the machine? I've used 16 oz poly batting with decorator fabrics top and bottom with no problem, didn't even have to adjust the foot for the thickness. jeri


JUST QUILTING

APQS SALES & SERVICE

Fil-Tec / Glide Distributor

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Has anyone tried the new wool "Tuscany" line of batting from Hobbs? I just saw it for the first time last week. It is made by Hobbs, very soft to the touch, medium loft for good definition on feathers, etc. I picked up a bag to give it a try. They are also selling a silk batting in this line as well.

(The "Hobbs" brand name is in teeny tiny print on the very bottom of the bag.)

http://www.hancocks-paducah.com/ItemList--Hobbs-Tuscany-Batting--m-253_693.html

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No, I haven't tried that batt...didn't know it existed. I have quilted with the older wool batt by hobbs and it quilted beautifully. I did quilt on the new Mountain Mist Gold which is 50 cotton/50 poly. It quilted up nicely. The only thing I found with it was the lint. I did get a lot more lint underneather. I was quilting with signature thread which produces it own lint, but this lint was lighter and fluffier.

Cheryl Mathre

Stone Creek Quilting

Sandy Hook, VA


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During the Minnesota Quilt Show this summer, I had the priviledge of working the entire show in the Hobbs booth with Darlene Christopherson. As explained to me, there is no difference between the Tuscany Wool and the original Hobbs Wool as far as the actual product. The difference is in the packaging and size (queen). It was packaged with the quilt shops in mind. It will also not be available to chain stores such as Joann Fabrics or Hancocks. I obtained a silk bat, that I have not used yet, but am excited to try.


Kathleen Crabtree

Quilting by KC

Sartell MN

quiltingbykc1@charter.net

Millennium, Bliss, Glide, Intelliquilter

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Mary Beth,

I haven't used a silk batt...but I have felt one and it is wonderful. It has a wonderful drape to it. I would use it in any quilt if it were me, but I don't want to pay the price.

Cheryl Mathre

Stone Creek Quilting

Sandy Hook, VA


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The wool is yummy to work with. I've used it on several quilts in the past. Harriett Hargraves said the wool was going to stay the same. I actually have one sitting here waiting for me to quilt it. I don't carry the wool but I have several customers who bring me the batts. One I quilted part of it and my customer is quilting the border designs, she choose the wool for her Amish style quilt because she says the wool hand quilts like butter and I had told her it quilted beautifully on the longarm on one of her previous quilts--so it does great for both worlds.

Am dying to try the silk as it feels soo nice but it hasn't fit the budget. I have several customers who will buy it from me whenever I can purchase a roll. I'm hoping that I can do that right after the first of the year. I won't have much time to "play" on my things until after the holidays anyway. I just left my husband so the budget doesn't have any extra room in it right now. I'm definately going to get the Tuscan rather than the Richmond Silk because of the cost and the Richmond one seemed looser like it might fall apart on the machine.

My plan for personal use is to make my Mom the blue and white quilt she wants and use the silk batting. It's soo light weight but is supposed to be toasty warm. My Mom is a teeny tiny thing about 90 lbs and has had multiple health problems the past 2 years so doesn't have much strengh and she is always cold. She has a king size bed and has trouble lifting even part of the comforter that is on it.

Longarm quilting has made me a thread and batting junkie:D


JUST QUILTING

APQS SALES & SERVICE

Fil-Tec / Glide Distributor

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Kathleen, I found that the Tuscany wool batt by Hobbs was very different in appearance and to the touch as compared to their Heirloom wool batting. I'm not sure why the Hobbs people are saying there is no difference. Just from my own observation, I saw a huge difference. I'm wondering what they meant by no difference?

I know that Diane Gaudynski and Harriet Hargrave are BIG fans of Hobbs Heirloom Wool, so I finally went into the store and see what this was all about and I really honestly could not quilt with it. When I saw the Tuscany wool by Hobbs, I thought it was something I'd be willing to give a try, it seems much better in quality, but whether it quilts up differently, better etc. I'm not sure. Diane's theory is that wool batting gives your quilting better definition, so much so that you can get away with using it without having to do trapunto to get great definition for feathers etc.

Mary Beth, I've heard that silk batting is a great choice for hand quilters, but I'm not an expert, I've just heard this mentioned before.

Kathy

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