MRogers5280

On board bobbin winder

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From your cone on winder side of machine, up through guide above cone. through eye and around tension (underneath L's in Millenium) through hole in side of bobbin and place on winder and flip switch up.  Should shut off when full.  There is a little piece of tubing on pin of winder so bobbin fits snug, if missing you can use a piece of fuel line from gas powered model airplane available at a hobby store.

 

Nigel


Brenda Wells - Green Millie. Sold November 2017
Nigel Wells - Ultimate 1 with Intellistitch & IQ.  Sold January 2019

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If you don't have the tubing and don't want to wait to get some, I have used the blue 3M painting tape wrapped around several times and it has worked well.  My hubby flies gas powered radio control airplanes and I was never able to find a piece of tubing that fit at the local RC stores I think I bought 4 or 5 kinds and finally gave up and used the tape until I could get the tubing from APQS.    I really dislike the onboard winder and am trying to justify at turbo bobbin winder.

 

Gail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gail

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We've never used the onboard winder.  The tubing suggestion came from a member here a number of years ago.  I also think someone mentioned using IV tubing, I believe she may have been a nurse.

 

Nigel


Brenda Wells - Green Millie. Sold November 2017
Nigel Wells - Ultimate 1 with Intellistitch & IQ.  Sold January 2019

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Mary R:  I think the results are in, and they pretty much indicate that on board bobbin winders are not the preferred way to wind bobbins.  Most folks either use pre-wounds, or wind their own on industrial stand alone winders.  The problem with the on boards is that you don't get a uniform winding tension because the bobbin gets wound at different speeds as the machines stitches faster and slower (or at least that's what I've been told - I've never used mine.  I wind all my long arm bobbins on stand alone winders, and use pre-wounds on the embroidery machine)  A lot of dealers encourage their customers to get a stand alone, and not bother with the on board set ups.  You'd probably be better served doing either.  You can buy a good industrial winder for about $100, so the cost is not prohibitive.    Jim

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Well, I'm going to chime in and say I use my on-board bobbin winder all the time and have very little issues with it. That's why I can't justify paying the price for the turbo bobbin winder. I have a few small stand along bobbin winders, but I don't like them as well as the one on the side of my machine. I do like the tubing APQS sends out for the bobbins to mount on when my tubing gets worn out (I've tried other tubing and it's not the same). Also if you wind your bobbins while your machine is NOT stitching, then the winding speed is consistent. Just my two cents, and I've had my machine since 2006.


Cindy Thompson

(My perfect quilting combo...Milli and Quiltazoid)

Chrome Top Quilts

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Thanks everyone - I got a bobbin wound. It appears that I may be missing a thread guide on the bobbin side of the machine (?) so I used a thread guide I got from Superior Threads and made it work. I'll try this for awhile and see if I need a stand alone.

 

MaryR

 

 

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