Sharonarooni

Help!! Stitching on applique

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Hi!

I am quilting a piece that has some appliqué fused down

but not stitched down. She asked me to just tack these down

as I quilt the quilt. My machine is balking at the fusible. Missing

stitches and sometimes breaking the bobbin thread, but usually not.

I have tried 3.5 and 4 needles, quilting very slowly, but then of

course I get wobbles. Help! Is there something I should know

that I'm not experienced enough to know? :/

Thanks in advance! ANY help is appreciated.

Sharon

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You might try a 4.5 needle.  The fusing could be pulling on the thread, causing it to break.  I thought we could use +/- one needle size without retiming.  Otherwise, maybe use a much smaller thread, so there will be more space with the 4.0 needle.  Maybe also try soaking the thread with sewers aid or mineral oil.  That may also help the thread move up and down through the fusing.  

 

Cagey


May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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Believe it or not, the fusible gets easier to quilt through the older the top gets. I once did a sweatshirt with fusible and my needle gummed up and the thread broke constantly. I finally gave up, the tried to finish is a year later and the fusible was not a problem at all!

Too bad you can't wait for the fusible to age! Is your needle getting sticky? You can clean it with alcohol.


Jennifer Bernard

My quilted jackets are on a competition journey around the country

gathering pretty ribbons (sometimes)!

Quilting with my Millennium and playing with my Quiltazoid!

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Thank you all! My needle isn't gumming up, and the thread is not

breaking at all now. Just a few stitches missed here and

there. I'm just going slow as Christmas like Charlotte suggests. It gets

more wobbly that way, but it is the only option. I'm trying a larger needle tomorrow.

Whew! :)

Sharon

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Sometimes the best thing to do is admit we can't do something. I recently returned such a project to a customer. She should have anchored these pieces on her domestic machine. I will never accept another project of this type...ever. Too much time and too much trouble..and too much stress over the results. No other profession is expected to do the impossible. Why should we?


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I'm with Lynn on this one.  When I get a project like this, I tell them I won't be stitching down the applique.  I'll do the background, borders, etc., but I won't be the stitching through the fusible.

 

We can set our own boundaries.  The longer I've been doing this, the easier it is to say "no" to some requests.  I'm making more boundaries too!  :)

 

Diane in MN

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While I can understand the glue from the fusible backing sticking to the needle as the heat builds up, I do not understand why you would not be able to adjust your machine to work with the backing.  I recently used multiple layers of fusible backing, along with one layer of embroidery  cutaway stabilizer, and another layer of wash-away stabilizer.  The whole things was starched into a board like layer.  While I did stitch around the outside edges of the appliqué with my DSM, my George had no problem powering through the layers and the stitch quality was fine after tweaking the tension.  

 

I found this on the APQS Blog;

 

 

Fusible interfacing and quilts

August 22, 2012



fusible%20interfacing%20Small.JPGFusible interfacing has transitioned from a staple in sewing rooms to a valuable tool for many quilters. Interfacing is often confused with "stabilizer" when quilters talk about special techniques such as thread play. However, stabilizer is meant to be removed from most quilting applications (unlike some embroidery applications, where the stabilizer remains in a garment). Fusible interfacing does stabilize the fabric to which it is applied, but it remains attached even when the project is finished.

Lamé fabrics and silk fabrics are often backed with lightweight fusible interfacing to give them body and prevent excessive raveling. 

Appliqué can be accomplished more quickly using interfacing as well. To appliqué with fusible interfacing, cut out the shape from both the main fabric and fusible interfacing, adding a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Place the right side of the fabric and the fusible side of the interfacing together. Pin and sew around the shape, using a 1/4-inch seam allowance and leaving an opening for turning. Clip curves and trim corners as necessary to reduce bulk on the finished design. Turn the appliqué right side out, then finger press the unsewn seam allowances inside. Don't iron the appliqué yet or you'll activate the fusible material and have a patch stuck to your ironing board! If needed, use a point turner or stiletto to carefully push out corners or small areas that aren't quite flat.

Position the appliqué in place with the interfacing side down on your background. Lightly press, holding the iron in each spot only 3-4 seconds. Finally, Stitch the appliqué in place by hand or machine. 

When quilting through interfacing, some residue may build up on your needle. As you quilt, your needle gets hot from the friction of entering all the quilt layers, and can sometimes get hot enough to melt the adhesive on the fusible interfacing. This clings to the needle and can make it feel "gummy" or can transfer unwanted glue to other areas of your quilt. Clean the needle with rubbing alcohol to cut through any residue. Slow down to keep the needle cool, and try adding a bit of liquid silicone to your thread to keep it cool (Sewer's Aid is one brand available in the notions department).

T-shirt quilts are usually backed with interfacing to stabilize the knit fabric. Use the same advice to prevent sticky build up on your needle, and be aware that needle heat can also "melt" some of the vinyl lettering on T-shirts and transfer it to other areas of the shirt. For example, you might quilt across a dark green vinyl name on a shirt, and carry some of that green color as little dots to other areas of the shirt. Either quilt around these areas, or move slowly through them and wipe your needle before moving to another area of the quilt.

 

Checking online, it appears they do make and sell non-sewable fusible backing;

  • Be sure to purchase a SEWABLE fusible adhesive if you’re going to be sewing because a non sewable kind will gum up your needle.

Though even then, it sounds like that would only gum up the needle, and make it feel like the machine is binding slightly.   Tension adjustments would seem to fix everything else.

 

Cagey

 

 

 

 

 

May your threads be balanced, and your bobbin forever full….

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I had a quilt earlier this year that had appliqued owls from Curtain fabric with a very stiff fusible behind them.  Doable but I had to keep cleaning the eye of my needle with alcohol to get rid of the gunk!

 

I use a 4.0 needle for everything!


Lyn Crump   Hand Guided 2013 Millenium Blissed and Gliding    APQS Sales Rep SE Qld Australia   www.busyquilting.com.au   On Facebook and Instagram as BusyQuilting


Attitude is everything - So pick a good one!

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Cagey,

This is a customer quilt. I only needle turn my own appliqué so I don't run into

the problem on my own quilts. It is an interesting article, though.

Everyone who has answered,

Thanks so much for all of your suggesestions. The problem

was not the needle gumming up . The problem is the fusible being so thick

that the needle flex is the problem. A larger needle and a super slow

hand is doing the trick. I will post some pics when I finish. :)

Thanks again! Sharon

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