ffq-lar

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  1. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in APQS Millenium for Sale - Southern Ontario   
    Nosy me wanted to help your sale (what a great price!) by noting that this is a "Green Millennium". Those are traded-in machines that are gone over completely at APQS, worn parts replaced, spiffed up, everything checked out, etc. So while the age of the body and some parts is 20 years, and seeing that she had a recent spa treatment, it's lots better than a used machine of the same vintage that hasn't had that treatment. Good luck with your sale!
  2. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in SCORE: vintage handkerchiefs   
    Hi Nancy Jo! Use Retro Clean to soak the hankies. It's not expensive and easy to find. It takes hot water and if there are heavy stains, more than one treatment. Works like a charm! If you haven't seen (Quilting Vintage) on Facebook, join to see lots of projects and advice for backing and stabilizing the hankies for use in quilts. Fun!
  3. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in SCORE: vintage handkerchiefs   
    Hi Nancy Jo! Use Retro Clean to soak the hankies. It's not expensive and easy to find. It takes hot water and if there are heavy stains, more than one treatment. Works like a charm! If you haven't seen (Quilting Vintage) on Facebook, join to see lots of projects and advice for backing and stabilizing the hankies for use in quilts. Fun!
  4. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Bobbin case stuck in Millennium   
    If Jim's suggestion didn't solve the problem, the case is jammed probably because there is thread snarled around the spindle. If you advance the hand wheel, does the needle go up and down? Can you see any stray thread in the area? Before deciding to remove the bobbin assembly (which might be a last resort) do a saturation with WD-40. Remove the needle plate and the needle so you can spray from all directions, put down a cloth to catch dips, and spray from the top and from the front. If the hand wheel moves, advance a couple of turns and re-spray. If it doesn't, try to rock it so you can get the WD-40 dispersed. That solvent will soften the thread---sometimes it takes a couple of hours and some re-application. All you need is enough threads to soften and snap so you can get the case out. Then remove any threads left in the bobbin assembly area and in the case. Check the case for round--it may be warped, depending on how forceful you need to be to get it out. Good luck!
  5. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in 2008 APQS Millie For Sale 12 ft Table - Indiana--SOLD!!   
    I will point out that this is a "green Millennium" which is a kind of hybrid that was developed by APQS. They would take a traded-in Ultimate machine, strip it and rebuild with the same components as a regular Millennium, selling them for about $3000 less than a new Millie. Old components that were the same as the new Millies were kept,  but electronics and SR added. The Ultimates were prior to 2000 and the Millennium after 2000. Not that it matters, since you have it priced attractively, but you don't want a buyer to claim that the year of manufacture was incorrect if you don't point out the history or maybe weren't aware of it. I believe APQS was doing this starting in 2005 but I may be wrong. Good luck with your sale---great price and someone will be so happy to get this!  Here's a link to answers from 2005. https://forum.apqs.com/topic/999-green-milli-and-freedom-sr/
     
  6. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in thread jam in hook assembly   
    You are doing the right thing. Douse it again with WD-40 and let it sit for a while. That will soften the thread even more. Continue to pull out the visible threads with tweezers and try to rock the assembly manually. If necessary, douse again and let it sit overnight, keep working, and you should be able to loosen things up. When the assembly turns, start it at a slow speed to twirl out any thread that's left.  Make sure you haven't blown a fuse with the jam. Wipe out and re-oil well with machine oil. Good luck, Jacque.
  7. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Broke needle   
    Hi new owner! Please stop everything until you can figure this out. You're hitting something (obviously) and need to remedy that before you gouge your hook assembly so badly that it will need to be replaced. The broken needle probably jammed your needle bar and now you may need to retime. The first step in timing is to check your needle depth at its lowest point. Sometimes adjusting the out-of-place needle bar is all you need to do. Videos are on-line and printed instructions for retiming are in the manual--it looks daunting but is pretty straightforward. And doing it correctly is a great confidence booster.  You said you were basting down the side---towards you?  Probably the needle jam displaced the needle bar enough so that stitching towards the front made the needle flex into the hook. Check the hook for gouges or burrs caused by the needle hitting it, which can be buffed out by following the instructions from APQS. If the hook assembly is too damaged to work (you'll have bad stitches and breaking thread) it will need to be replaced. It all sounds like gloom and doom, but it's just a matter of knowing where to look and everything is repairable---most repairs you can do yourself. I wish you much good luck in getting to know your machine. You'll be a pro in no time.
  8. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Baste a quilt   
    I do this about twice a year--mostly for my hand-quilting friends. I charge a half-cent per square inch with a $50 minimum for this. But if you want, you can charge her by the hour. It may take you longer to load it than to stitch it, but you still need to be paid for your time. A moderate-sized quilt may take 2 hours total, so the $50 minimum is fair. No way is it a 10 minute job. Attached is a diagram of my quilting path for basting. It's a grid without long verticals and is very fast. Use a heavier, contrasting poly and a long stitch-length for ease of stitch-removal. Don't cross at the corners so the fabric can be manipulated by the quilter if necessary. Don't let your friend make the decisions ---she doesn't know what's involved. This technique and attaching binding on the longarm are services you can advertise. Not everyone offers them.

  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Baste a quilt   
    I do this about twice a year--mostly for my hand-quilting friends. I charge a half-cent per square inch with a $50 minimum for this. But if you want, you can charge her by the hour. It may take you longer to load it than to stitch it, but you still need to be paid for your time. A moderate-sized quilt may take 2 hours total, so the $50 minimum is fair. No way is it a 10 minute job. Attached is a diagram of my quilting path for basting. It's a grid without long verticals and is very fast. Use a heavier, contrasting poly and a long stitch-length for ease of stitch-removal. Don't cross at the corners so the fabric can be manipulated by the quilter if necessary. Don't let your friend make the decisions ---she doesn't know what's involved. This technique and attaching binding on the longarm are services you can advertise. Not everyone offers them.

  10. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in thread jam in hook assembly   
    You are doing the right thing. Douse it again with WD-40 and let it sit for a while. That will soften the thread even more. Continue to pull out the visible threads with tweezers and try to rock the assembly manually. If necessary, douse again and let it sit overnight, keep working, and you should be able to loosen things up. When the assembly turns, start it at a slow speed to twirl out any thread that's left.  Make sure you haven't blown a fuse with the jam. Wipe out and re-oil well with machine oil. Good luck, Jacque.
  11. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from CinFar in Minky on the back- batting or not?   
    It will work either way, but batting will add a lot of weight to an already-heavy project.
    It's not necessary to use batting with Minkee, so it's your call.
    Load with the selvages pinned to the leaders and make sure the side clamps are loose and not stretching the Minkee at the sides. I actually pin the top and the Minkee together all along the sides and then fasten the side clamps over a pin. It seems to stabilize the stretchy Minkee a bit and reminds me not to tighten the elastic of the clamps too much.
  12. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from CinFar in SCRIM on bTTING   
    With all batting, the scrim goes next to the backer---so it faces down. With that said, most scrimmed cotton batting has the scrim buried within the layers. The fibers are needle-punched into  the scrim (a sheet of very strong and very thin polyester) and the key to placement is the direction of that needle punching. Your machine needle should go through in the same direction as the needle punching. So look at the batting---one side is smoother and has tiny visible holes (dimples). The other side will be rougher-looking and a bit raggedy (pimples). So the rule is "show your dimples---up---and hide your pimples---down". Another way to tell is most batting is folded with the "good" side out, just like fabric. That good side goes up and the uglier side down---look for the center crease/fold line. Make it a mountain instead of a valley when it's loaded. Poly batting may have a chemical scrim---an application of a chemical that bonds the poly fibers on only one side. That side feels much rougher and it will be placed next to the backer. Hope this is helpful.
  13. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from CinFar in Take up roller brake   
    You have several things to look at---it doesn't have anything to do with the brake. First, make sure the backers you load are perfectly on-grain. This can be done with tearing the fabric instead of rotary cutting. If it's always on one side, your rollers may not be perfectly parallel or level. Just a small bit high on the right side will cause that side to roll tighter, which magnifies with every advance. Use a long level to check for horizontal level. Then adjust the bolts that attach the roller to the frame until the roller is level. Unfurl your leaders when you check for level so you are on bare metal and not the canvas. The front roller can also be off as far as distance between the take-up rollers. If the right side is farther out, it will roll tight on the right side. The solution is looking at the bolts that fasten it to the frame. You need to count the bolt-threads on each bolt, left and right. If the numbers are off---make them match. You can also count the bolt-threads on the back roller attachments if you don't have a long level. Finally, your leaders may be un-square/off. There are lots of tutorials that show how to fix warped or saggy leaders. Usually having (or making) a straight edge, then pinning the leaders together works well. Pin them, spritz them with plain water, tighten them, and let them dry. Hoping this is helpful!
  14. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Take up roller brake   
    You have several things to look at---it doesn't have anything to do with the brake. First, make sure the backers you load are perfectly on-grain. This can be done with tearing the fabric instead of rotary cutting. If it's always on one side, your rollers may not be perfectly parallel or level. Just a small bit high on the right side will cause that side to roll tighter, which magnifies with every advance. Use a long level to check for horizontal level. Then adjust the bolts that attach the roller to the frame until the roller is level. Unfurl your leaders when you check for level so you are on bare metal and not the canvas. The front roller can also be off as far as distance between the take-up rollers. If the right side is farther out, it will roll tight on the right side. The solution is looking at the bolts that fasten it to the frame. You need to count the bolt-threads on each bolt, left and right. If the numbers are off---make them match. You can also count the bolt-threads on the back roller attachments if you don't have a long level. Finally, your leaders may be un-square/off. There are lots of tutorials that show how to fix warped or saggy leaders. Usually having (or making) a straight edge, then pinning the leaders together works well. Pin them, spritz them with plain water, tighten them, and let them dry. Hoping this is helpful!
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilt fabulous in Help: Floating Top & not keeping square on frame   
    I'll have to disagree with Lynn. I float exclusively and have never had a problem like Kerri describes. I check for square with every roll and add tension when needed with magnetic bars. Square quilts stay square and un-square ones are dealt with individually to correct. 
  16. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in COVID 19 and Quilt Intake   
    I have my customers put the parts in a seal-able bag (like a big Zip-loc) and drop it in front of my garage. I put out a wire bin on a small table that is under cover. We may talk at a distance. They put any instructions in the bag. I wear protective gloves, wipe the bag thoroughly with a disinfectant, then it goes into an un-used, un-heated shop for three days (or longer).  I phone to discuss choices of thread and quilting. After quilting, she picks up in the same way and she uses whatever method she's comfortable with to assure it's safe. I'm in Washington State where people are advised to disinfect anything that comes into your living spaces. And I have a hubby with some lung problems so I'm not taking any chances. So far no one has balked and everyone is dropping off. I do four quilts a month so it isn't a parade of customers. One thing that stuck with me was a statement that "if you overreact, you'll never know if it was the right decision. If you under-react, you will know immediately". Stay well and safe. And if you decide it's necessary to stop all contact, provisions are in place to provide benefits to self-employed workers.
  17. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in COVID 19 and Quilt Intake   
    I have my customers put the parts in a seal-able bag (like a big Zip-loc) and drop it in front of my garage. I put out a wire bin on a small table that is under cover. We may talk at a distance. They put any instructions in the bag. I wear protective gloves, wipe the bag thoroughly with a disinfectant, then it goes into an un-used, un-heated shop for three days (or longer).  I phone to discuss choices of thread and quilting. After quilting, she picks up in the same way and she uses whatever method she's comfortable with to assure it's safe. I'm in Washington State where people are advised to disinfect anything that comes into your living spaces. And I have a hubby with some lung problems so I'm not taking any chances. So far no one has balked and everyone is dropping off. I do four quilts a month so it isn't a parade of customers. One thing that stuck with me was a statement that "if you overreact, you'll never know if it was the right decision. If you under-react, you will know immediately". Stay well and safe. And if you decide it's necessary to stop all contact, provisions are in place to provide benefits to self-employed workers.
  18. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dianne31331 in Lesson Learnt   
    Legally, you can send a registered letter to the customer stating that unless payment is made within xx amount of time (60 days where I live but I think 90 days elsewhere) the quilt becomes your property to sell to recoup the quilting fees. You'll be surprised how quickly they can find the cash!
     
    If they still can't pay, you have to hope that the quilt will sell. Or donate it to whatever charity you like. Get a valuation from the charity for tax purposes.
     
    I wouldn't be a bit concerned about losing a customer--she lost you as a quilter through her own actions.
  19. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in SCRIM on bTTING   
    With all batting, the scrim goes next to the backer---so it faces down. With that said, most scrimmed cotton batting has the scrim buried within the layers. The fibers are needle-punched into  the scrim (a sheet of very strong and very thin polyester) and the key to placement is the direction of that needle punching. Your machine needle should go through in the same direction as the needle punching. So look at the batting---one side is smoother and has tiny visible holes (dimples). The other side will be rougher-looking and a bit raggedy (pimples). So the rule is "show your dimples---up---and hide your pimples---down". Another way to tell is most batting is folded with the "good" side out, just like fabric. That good side goes up and the uglier side down---look for the center crease/fold line. Make it a mountain instead of a valley when it's loaded. Poly batting may have a chemical scrim---an application of a chemical that bonds the poly fibers on only one side. That side feels much rougher and it will be placed next to the backer. Hope this is helpful.
  20. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Plumpurple in SCRIM on bTTING   
    With all batting, the scrim goes next to the backer---so it faces down. With that said, most scrimmed cotton batting has the scrim buried within the layers. The fibers are needle-punched into  the scrim (a sheet of very strong and very thin polyester) and the key to placement is the direction of that needle punching. Your machine needle should go through in the same direction as the needle punching. So look at the batting---one side is smoother and has tiny visible holes (dimples). The other side will be rougher-looking and a bit raggedy (pimples). So the rule is "show your dimples---up---and hide your pimples---down". Another way to tell is most batting is folded with the "good" side out, just like fabric. That good side goes up and the uglier side down---look for the center crease/fold line. Make it a mountain instead of a valley when it's loaded. Poly batting may have a chemical scrim---an application of a chemical that bonds the poly fibers on only one side. That side feels much rougher and it will be placed next to the backer. Hope this is helpful.
  21. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from lkl in SCRIM on bTTING   
    With all batting, the scrim goes next to the backer---so it faces down. With that said, most scrimmed cotton batting has the scrim buried within the layers. The fibers are needle-punched into  the scrim (a sheet of very strong and very thin polyester) and the key to placement is the direction of that needle punching. Your machine needle should go through in the same direction as the needle punching. So look at the batting---one side is smoother and has tiny visible holes (dimples). The other side will be rougher-looking and a bit raggedy (pimples). So the rule is "show your dimples---up---and hide your pimples---down". Another way to tell is most batting is folded with the "good" side out, just like fabric. That good side goes up and the uglier side down---look for the center crease/fold line. Make it a mountain instead of a valley when it's loaded. Poly batting may have a chemical scrim---an application of a chemical that bonds the poly fibers on only one side. That side feels much rougher and it will be placed next to the backer. Hope this is helpful.
  22. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in SCRIM on bTTING   
    With all batting, the scrim goes next to the backer---so it faces down. With that said, most scrimmed cotton batting has the scrim buried within the layers. The fibers are needle-punched into  the scrim (a sheet of very strong and very thin polyester) and the key to placement is the direction of that needle punching. Your machine needle should go through in the same direction as the needle punching. So look at the batting---one side is smoother and has tiny visible holes (dimples). The other side will be rougher-looking and a bit raggedy (pimples). So the rule is "show your dimples---up---and hide your pimples---down". Another way to tell is most batting is folded with the "good" side out, just like fabric. That good side goes up and the uglier side down---look for the center crease/fold line. Make it a mountain instead of a valley when it's loaded. Poly batting may have a chemical scrim---an application of a chemical that bonds the poly fibers on only one side. That side feels much rougher and it will be placed next to the backer. Hope this is helpful.
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Lauralorene in What to charge for hand quilting?   
    Traditionally the hand-quilters-for-hire (Amish or Mennonites) charge by the yard of thread used. They wind the quilting thread around and around a yardstick and cut into 1 yard pieces. So just like longarming, the cost is dependent upon the density of the quilting. The complexity of the design isn't as crucial since most groups only accept tops that have been pre-marked into designs by the customer, or that have simpler no-mark quilting like crosshatching or quarter-inch-from-the-seams. Search on line--I know the Mennonites in Oregon offer this. See what they charge. Usually turn-around is six months or more.
  24. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in L Bobbin Quickly Runs Out Of Thread?   
    Two options for you---spend the $$ to convert to the M size bobbin. Or wind your own (or purchase pre-wound bobbins) using thinner thread. There is no rule that the thread weight, or even color, has to match top and bobbin. BottomLine (Superior) thread is poly and 60 weight---and designed to be used as bobbin thread using other weights of thread as top thread. The pre-wounds hold 119 yards of thread. If you wind your own, probably 90-100 yards will load, depending on the tension and how full they are wound. With a 3000 yard cone of BL, you can wind 30 bobbins at 100 yards each. The cost for a cone is wholesale $7.90 and retail $14.49. If you do the math you'll find out how much a bobbin will cost in just materials. If you can figure out how many yards you load when winding say a 40 weight thread to match what you're using as top thread, then figure the math using the cost per spool/cone, you can see if the thinner thread bobbins are more economical. I know they will last much longer. I do custom quilting almost exclusively and find a bobbin of BL will last me close to an hour of medium-speed stitching. If you opt to try thinner thread, ask opinions here for what colors blend the best and which neutrals are good to start out with.
  25. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Beware of trolls and fraudulent members on this forum!!!   
    Hi MB! Those were the days, huh? What a great group! Through our forum friendships I got to personally meet Barb Mayfield (Washington like me), Mary Beth (Missouri), Shana (Alaska),  Rita Armstrong (North Carolina), Dell D (Florida), Myrna Ficken, Linda Alexander (remember her?), Dawn, almost the entire APQS sales group and a couple of techs, an entire group of owners from the Portland,OR area---we started a great longarming group--and many sisters I've never met. Yes, we had a few clunkers (remember Michaelalan---the dismissive man-splainer?) and cried along with family when we lost a few. I miss the old forum but I love FB and enjoy seeing lots of the old forum friends there.