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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dramaqueenB in Little Brown Bird quilt   
    Here is my barter quilt--I love it! It is King size with a pillow tuck so the medallion will be centered on the bed. The background is not pale blue, it is white. My camera was confused!

  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Liam in Little Brown Bird quilt   
    I am so lucky to be the quilter for this fabulous applique quilt. For those who haven't seen one of these, it has it's own book! My LQS has an LBB group, like a Dear Jane group.
    This one was beautifully appliqued by someone we all know...
    I will tell you who after I post some pictures and you can drool over her hand-applique and piecing skills!
    Here is a full shot of the whole wonderful quilt.

  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from GMALKB in Little Brown Bird quilt   
    A little wider shot.

  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dramaqueenB in Little Brown Bird quilt   
    I am so lucky to be the quilter for this fabulous applique quilt. For those who haven't seen one of these, it has it's own book! My LQS has an LBB group, like a Dear Jane group.
    This one was beautifully appliqued by someone we all know...
    I will tell you who after I post some pictures and you can drool over her hand-applique and piecing skills!
    Here is a full shot of the whole wonderful quilt.

  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Leida Glez in Little Brown Bird quilt   
    I am so lucky to be the quilter for this fabulous applique quilt. For those who haven't seen one of these, it has it's own book! My LQS has an LBB group, like a Dear Jane group.
    This one was beautifully appliqued by someone we all know...
    I will tell you who after I post some pictures and you can drool over her hand-applique and piecing skills!
    Here is a full shot of the whole wonderful quilt.

  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Problem with securing stitch   
    Going with a thinner needle won't help--in fact, a bigger needle will work better. I use a 4.0 for everything unless I'm using 100 weight silk thread. Going through bulky seams at the start sometimes requires some help by turning the flywheel manually to encourage the needle through. When you hear the dreaded hummmm put pressure on the flywheel manually and in the correct direction. Dawn explained that while it's easy to plow through bulky seam intersections during regular stitching, at the start it's hard to do. Her analogy was driving a nail into wood. If you press on the nail head with the hammer, nothing happens. But if you haul back and slam it, the nail is driven into the wood. When you're at a bulky spot starting out, the needle down is like pressing the hammer on the nail. It needs more ooomph so help it along. I also recommend choosing a thinner spot to start. If you're stitching CCs needle down a quarter inch away in the direction you'll be stitching. Bring up the thread and start with a run at the intersection and backtrack out again. 
    If your needle up/down is hesitating you can up the speed. I have an older machine and mine is the famous #8 screw technique. I don't know how the newer machines adjust but suspect it's easier. Check your manual for instructions on adjusting the needle up/down speed.
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Zora in Problem with securing stitch   
    Going with a thinner needle won't help--in fact, a bigger needle will work better. I use a 4.0 for everything unless I'm using 100 weight silk thread. Going through bulky seams at the start sometimes requires some help by turning the flywheel manually to encourage the needle through. When you hear the dreaded hummmm put pressure on the flywheel manually and in the correct direction. Dawn explained that while it's easy to plow through bulky seam intersections during regular stitching, at the start it's hard to do. Her analogy was driving a nail into wood. If you press on the nail head with the hammer, nothing happens. But if you haul back and slam it, the nail is driven into the wood. When you're at a bulky spot starting out, the needle down is like pressing the hammer on the nail. It needs more ooomph so help it along. I also recommend choosing a thinner spot to start. If you're stitching CCs needle down a quarter inch away in the direction you'll be stitching. Bring up the thread and start with a run at the intersection and backtrack out again. 
    If your needle up/down is hesitating you can up the speed. I have an older machine and mine is the famous #8 screw technique. I don't know how the newer machines adjust but suspect it's easier. Check your manual for instructions on adjusting the needle up/down speed.
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from T Row Studio in Problem with securing stitch   
    Going with a thinner needle won't help--in fact, a bigger needle will work better. I use a 4.0 for everything unless I'm using 100 weight silk thread. Going through bulky seams at the start sometimes requires some help by turning the flywheel manually to encourage the needle through. When you hear the dreaded hummmm put pressure on the flywheel manually and in the correct direction. Dawn explained that while it's easy to plow through bulky seam intersections during regular stitching, at the start it's hard to do. Her analogy was driving a nail into wood. If you press on the nail head with the hammer, nothing happens. But if you haul back and slam it, the nail is driven into the wood. When you're at a bulky spot starting out, the needle down is like pressing the hammer on the nail. It needs more ooomph so help it along. I also recommend choosing a thinner spot to start. If you're stitching CCs needle down a quarter inch away in the direction you'll be stitching. Bring up the thread and start with a run at the intersection and backtrack out again. 
    If your needle up/down is hesitating you can up the speed. I have an older machine and mine is the famous #8 screw technique. I don't know how the newer machines adjust but suspect it's easier. Check your manual for instructions on adjusting the needle up/down speed.
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from aleksich in Oil on Quilt from Bobbin   
    1.  Clear machine oil can be removed from the quilt. Lay it flat, pile on baking soda, leave it for a few hours, and vacuum it off. If it's still there, re-apply, repeat, until the oil is gone. It's like talcum and absorbs the oil completely. If it's grease and not oil, you'll probably need to use another method and probably need to wash it.
     
    2.  Oil at the beginning of your day and wipe out all the excess. Don't oil the wicks until there is no residual oil when you touch them with a finger. 
     
    3. Sorry about your fluffy batting. I don't use that method. I just lay the batting out across the rollers and let it relax. Sorry I can't be of help with that.
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Oil on Quilt from Bobbin   
    1.  Clear machine oil can be removed from the quilt. Lay it flat, pile on baking soda, leave it for a few hours, and vacuum it off. If it's still there, re-apply, repeat, until the oil is gone. It's like talcum and absorbs the oil completely. If it's grease and not oil, you'll probably need to use another method and probably need to wash it.
     
    2.  Oil at the beginning of your day and wipe out all the excess. Don't oil the wicks until there is no residual oil when you touch them with a finger. 
     
    3. Sorry about your fluffy batting. I don't use that method. I just lay the batting out across the rollers and let it relax. Sorry I can't be of help with that.
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Leida Glez in Oil on Quilt from Bobbin   
    1.  Clear machine oil can be removed from the quilt. Lay it flat, pile on baking soda, leave it for a few hours, and vacuum it off. If it's still there, re-apply, repeat, until the oil is gone. It's like talcum and absorbs the oil completely. If it's grease and not oil, you'll probably need to use another method and probably need to wash it.
     
    2.  Oil at the beginning of your day and wipe out all the excess. Don't oil the wicks until there is no residual oil when you touch them with a finger. 
     
    3. Sorry about your fluffy batting. I don't use that method. I just lay the batting out across the rollers and let it relax. Sorry I can't be of help with that.
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Oil on Quilt from Bobbin   
    1.  Clear machine oil can be removed from the quilt. Lay it flat, pile on baking soda, leave it for a few hours, and vacuum it off. If it's still there, re-apply, repeat, until the oil is gone. It's like talcum and absorbs the oil completely. If it's grease and not oil, you'll probably need to use another method and probably need to wash it.
     
    2.  Oil at the beginning of your day and wipe out all the excess. Don't oil the wicks until there is no residual oil when you touch them with a finger. 
     
    3. Sorry about your fluffy batting. I don't use that method. I just lay the batting out across the rollers and let it relax. Sorry I can't be of help with that.
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Quilt size   
    Your leaders are 120" but you can only load a 120" backer if the leaders line up. Sight from front to back to see if they are aligned. Off by a half-inch will result in that much loss of pinning length. My leaders were never perfectly aligned so the best length I could load was 118". Plus if the leaders are stretched, they may scroll in at the edges. I figure that with 118" of usable leader, less two inches at each side for clamping, the best I can do is 114" wide for the top. Room for a King as long as the narrowest measurement falls within that. 
     
    DenaG, get at least a 12' table if you have room.
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Leida Glez in 100 wt thread   
    Hi Meg! I used Invisifil 100 weight with Bottomline bobbins and had great stitches. 
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from meg in 100 wt thread   
    Hi Meg! I used Invisifil 100 weight with Bottomline bobbins and had great stitches. 
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Price for Squaring up the Backing and Batting   
    Hey is my loading technique for un-square backers.
    You must start with one on-grain edge to load to the front leader. Use a selvage or tear it straight (steam it if the edge is distorted from tearing). Load (I pin) to the front leader.
     
    Gather the fabric and bring under the front roller, under the leveler roller, and over the back take-up roller. Set the brake and go to the back to pull all the fabric as tight as you can and pool the excess on the table or the floor. You want the fabric in the field to be flat without ripples.
     
    Go to the front and use your power advance to make the backer come over the back roller and load onto the front roller---hand advance the front roller so the tension on the backer is even and tight. The canvas on the top roller provides enough "bite" that the fabric won't slip in any direction.
     
    Go slowly and watch that the fabric along the top of the back roller stays flat without ripples. When you see some bunching or ripples, stop, brake, go to the back and pull/tug the ripples out, dispersing them to the edges. Continue loading the backer to the front roller, keeping it flat and straight with some tension on it. Watch for the back fabric edge to clear the table top. Stop.
     
    Since the front edge was on-grain and since you've advanced carefully to keep it on-grain, the far edge should be parallel with the table top. If it's not, it's not on-grain. The "short" edge marks where a horizontal line straight across will be on-grain. I place the short edge right on the table top and use the line where the fabric "folds" on the table to place pins every few inches to mark where the s-o-g is for pinning. No trimming, just pinning. I also use tape or a purple marker to mark both edges of the backer on the leader. Pin the backer to the leader, using the side marks and the pinned straight line as parameters.
     
    Go to the front, advance the slack backer to the back roller and then back onto the front roller. Advance back an forth if you have any side sagging. Both the front and back edges are s-o-g.
     
    The sides may have scrolled in or out as you advanced. The usable backer is the edge that is closest in on both edges. If the side scrolled out, the usable inside edge can be found by feeling for the last pin that's buried under the scrolled fabric---mark that spot on the un-used top roller leader with tape or marking pen. If the side scrolls in, advance the backer with tension on it until you can see the closest in the backer lies. Mark that spot on the top leader. The distance between the two mark is the actual usable backer width that is on s-o-g and hopefully the top will fit between the two marks. If it doesn't the backer is too wonky to work---do not try to load crooked or pull the top over to fit as you work down the top. It will never lie flat or hang straight.
     
    Hoping this was helpful. Email me if you're stumped and need more info.
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from JeannieB in Price for Squaring up the Backing and Batting   
    Hey is my loading technique for un-square backers.
    You must start with one on-grain edge to load to the front leader. Use a selvage or tear it straight (steam it if the edge is distorted from tearing). Load (I pin) to the front leader.
     
    Gather the fabric and bring under the front roller, under the leveler roller, and over the back take-up roller. Set the brake and go to the back to pull all the fabric as tight as you can and pool the excess on the table or the floor. You want the fabric in the field to be flat without ripples.
     
    Go to the front and use your power advance to make the backer come over the back roller and load onto the front roller---hand advance the front roller so the tension on the backer is even and tight. The canvas on the top roller provides enough "bite" that the fabric won't slip in any direction.
     
    Go slowly and watch that the fabric along the top of the back roller stays flat without ripples. When you see some bunching or ripples, stop, brake, go to the back and pull/tug the ripples out, dispersing them to the edges. Continue loading the backer to the front roller, keeping it flat and straight with some tension on it. Watch for the back fabric edge to clear the table top. Stop.
     
    Since the front edge was on-grain and since you've advanced carefully to keep it on-grain, the far edge should be parallel with the table top. If it's not, it's not on-grain. The "short" edge marks where a horizontal line straight across will be on-grain. I place the short edge right on the table top and use the line where the fabric "folds" on the table to place pins every few inches to mark where the s-o-g is for pinning. No trimming, just pinning. I also use tape or a purple marker to mark both edges of the backer on the leader. Pin the backer to the leader, using the side marks and the pinned straight line as parameters.
     
    Go to the front, advance the slack backer to the back roller and then back onto the front roller. Advance back an forth if you have any side sagging. Both the front and back edges are s-o-g.
     
    The sides may have scrolled in or out as you advanced. The usable backer is the edge that is closest in on both edges. If the side scrolled out, the usable inside edge can be found by feeling for the last pin that's buried under the scrolled fabric---mark that spot on the un-used top roller leader with tape or marking pen. If the side scrolls in, advance the backer with tension on it until you can see the closest in the backer lies. Mark that spot on the top leader. The distance between the two mark is the actual usable backer width that is on s-o-g and hopefully the top will fit between the two marks. If it doesn't the backer is too wonky to work---do not try to load crooked or pull the top over to fit as you work down the top. It will never lie flat or hang straight.
     
    Hoping this was helpful. Email me if you're stumped and need more info.
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Quilt Planning Ideas   
    Thanks Connie!
     
    I noticed the same thing and didn't post since I've been privately (and publicly) chastised for speaking up about this type of thing.
     
     Quiltster is being beta tested and is a program for placing your fabric choices into Quiltworx (Judy Niemeyer) patterns. Great application and very helpful. She may be trying to help, or she may be a paid poster and finding as many quilting sites as she can to get the word out.  Nice to share new stuff, but if it's a good application, word will get out easily and fast. 
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Bonnie in Ok in Quilt Planning Ideas   
    Thanks Connie!
     
    I noticed the same thing and didn't post since I've been privately (and publicly) chastised for speaking up about this type of thing.
     
     Quiltster is being beta tested and is a program for placing your fabric choices into Quiltworx (Judy Niemeyer) patterns. Great application and very helpful. She may be trying to help, or she may be a paid poster and finding as many quilting sites as she can to get the word out.  Nice to share new stuff, but if it's a good application, word will get out easily and fast. 
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to Gator in Quilt Planning Ideas   
    I don't want to be mean but I think this might be spam look at the advertisement under her signature?  Quiltster sign-up?
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to mamaahma in Price for Squaring up the Backing and Batting   
    I load all my backs using Linda's method - this way is the BOMB!!
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Charmaine in Price for Squaring up the Backing and Batting   
    Hey is my loading technique for un-square backers.
    You must start with one on-grain edge to load to the front leader. Use a selvage or tear it straight (steam it if the edge is distorted from tearing). Load (I pin) to the front leader.
     
    Gather the fabric and bring under the front roller, under the leveler roller, and over the back take-up roller. Set the brake and go to the back to pull all the fabric as tight as you can and pool the excess on the table or the floor. You want the fabric in the field to be flat without ripples.
     
    Go to the front and use your power advance to make the backer come over the back roller and load onto the front roller---hand advance the front roller so the tension on the backer is even and tight. The canvas on the top roller provides enough "bite" that the fabric won't slip in any direction.
     
    Go slowly and watch that the fabric along the top of the back roller stays flat without ripples. When you see some bunching or ripples, stop, brake, go to the back and pull/tug the ripples out, dispersing them to the edges. Continue loading the backer to the front roller, keeping it flat and straight with some tension on it. Watch for the back fabric edge to clear the table top. Stop.
     
    Since the front edge was on-grain and since you've advanced carefully to keep it on-grain, the far edge should be parallel with the table top. If it's not, it's not on-grain. The "short" edge marks where a horizontal line straight across will be on-grain. I place the short edge right on the table top and use the line where the fabric "folds" on the table to place pins every few inches to mark where the s-o-g is for pinning. No trimming, just pinning. I also use tape or a purple marker to mark both edges of the backer on the leader. Pin the backer to the leader, using the side marks and the pinned straight line as parameters.
     
    Go to the front, advance the slack backer to the back roller and then back onto the front roller. Advance back an forth if you have any side sagging. Both the front and back edges are s-o-g.
     
    The sides may have scrolled in or out as you advanced. The usable backer is the edge that is closest in on both edges. If the side scrolled out, the usable inside edge can be found by feeling for the last pin that's buried under the scrolled fabric---mark that spot on the un-used top roller leader with tape or marking pen. If the side scrolls in, advance the backer with tension on it until you can see the closest in the backer lies. Mark that spot on the top leader. The distance between the two mark is the actual usable backer width that is on s-o-g and hopefully the top will fit between the two marks. If it doesn't the backer is too wonky to work---do not try to load crooked or pull the top over to fit as you work down the top. It will never lie flat or hang straight.
     
    Hoping this was helpful. Email me if you're stumped and need more info.
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Disclaimer for Work Order   
    If you're concerned about potential poor piecing, whether open seams or wavy borders or blocks, merely add "Top will be quilted in the condition it is received" to your intake sheet. Have the customer sign it. If you find problems at intake, note them with your comment that there may be pleats or tucks on top or backer due to "xyz" present. Take good pictures of problems after the quilt is loaded to be armed with evidence if needed. Call the customer if you find something really bad after loading, talk with them about what your solutions are, and document the call on the back of the intake sheet---date, time, and what you both said. Let her know you are taking notes of the conversation--"I'm writing this all down so I remember it" and not "Your quilt is a train wreck and I'm protecting myself when you decide it's not a silk purse when I finish."
     
    All of your customers know the level of their skills. They know if the borders are pieced to fit. Gently pointing out the issues if you catch them at intake and letting them know what you'll do to fix the problems (without judgement and with a positive attitude) will build their confidence in you and keep them coming back. Offer instruction sources for their problem areas if they are welcoming of help---but after you finish. Work around what you can, find the best solution for what you can't fix with the quilting, and be armed with documentation for any after effects.
     
    Remember as well---you can give back any quilt that you feel will reflect badly on you because of your customers piecing skills. It's tricky but you'll have less stress.
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Sharonarooni in Tula Pink's butterfly quilt-quilting suggestions   
    Hi Lorrie. I quilted one of these this Fall. Send me an email and I'll forward some photos. There are very few quilted examples on line---I looked long and hard! 
    lindarech@comcast.net
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in monofilament uses   
    Whoever has "frowned upon" invisible thread hasn't tried it or hasn't found the perfect use for it. I just used Essence monofil by Filtec on an entire double quilt. The customers budget wouldn't support thread color changes needed for separate quilting of white and very colorful fabric in the piecing--- she suggested invisible thread and it worked great for a medium overall.
    You wouldn't opt for this type of thread for micro-stitching because of the bit of shine you can get. But most other applications are fine. You can ditch and outline with it--really its best use. You can do CCs, line work--anything. All that shows is needle holes and texture. The thread I mentioned above is the absolute thinnest mono I've used. Smaller than a hair and forgiving with a tiny bit of tension tweaking. Loosen the top and the bobbin tension and test it out. Minimal breakage. And the Filtec is super inexpensive. I've used Monolon (Superior) and Monofil (Madeira). The Essence is my favorite
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