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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from jbnt9999 in Need help again with how to quilt?   
    If you're going to put feathers in the center star diamonds, do the same in the matching rust-colored outer diamonds between the houses. What are the plans for the background?
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Need a little pep talk - share your stories of starting out!   
    You can do it you can do it you can do it! There's a pep talk!
    The key to the whole thing is just one thing--customers.
    Sounds lame and simple, but it's the truth.
    Do all the things you need to do to build a customer base.
    Join guilds, (and be sure you make friends and contribute there and not be thought that you're there to troll for customers).
    Make friends at the LQS.
    Be generous.
    Build your skills so you have lots to offer.
    I think you're on track and have a realistic grasp of what it will take. As you improve and do more customer quilting you'll find a niche--either you'll fill a local need for a specific technique (like E2E or custom) or you'll find the type of quilting you love and that makes your heart sing--and you'll get so good at it that the customers will seek you out.
    I practiced and quilted for friends for five months before a business card at an LQS brought me my first customer. It was slow going the first year and I learned so much quilting customer quilts. The second year I doubled the first in net income and number of quilts. Third year I doubled the second year and reach the maximum I'm willing to take in per month. I started in 2005 and love it more every year!
  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from CrazyAboutQuilting in Need help again with how to quilt?   
    The house shapes can be marked into triangles using the adjacent seams. The smaller house can have 5 triangles and the larger house 6 triangles. Make sure you're careful to mark them all the same (meaning, if you mark a square and then into triangles, make sure when you halve it into triangles the lines match in each similar space---don't ask why I'm mentioning this...  ) Mark the triangles and CC them. Use a more decorative CC if the budget allows. Feathers in the star points will be lovely.
  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Recommendation for Quilt Pattern   
    Do an on-line search for "medallion quilt patterns". My guild had a BOM two years ago where instead of Block of the Month it was Border of the Month. Members started with a 20" square center using any technique, from one piece of fabric, to applique, to paper piecing.  Then one border was added per month. Some very creative and beautiful quilts resulted.
  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to Corey in How would you quilt this?   
    I love this quilt, log cabin courthouse steps.
    The most effective way I quilted a similar quilt (IMHO) was circles like Linda's suggestion. Time consuming, lots of starts & stops but worth it. The quilting will complement the quilt top/piecing.
    Circle Lord sells gizmo to make circles,
    Linda Rech's website has topper tools, either way you will have to invest because circles are best done with tools like these.
  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from gardenslug in Vintage Double Wedding Ring quilt   
    My customer picked up this vintage DWR top at a local antique mall for $60. The fabric is vintage feed sacks with 1930's solids and everything is hand-pieced except the green four patches. One piece in an edge arc had a hole and she replaced with a scrap of 30's feed sack fabric she inherited from her mom. One or two arc seams were repaired as well. It has some stains and dye transfer from being folded on itself, but she'll use Synthrapol and a mild restoration soap to do the final cleaning after she binds it. Wool batting made everything so nice.
    I did an era-friendly flower design, a double leaf in the yellow football shapes and CC's over pairs of arc piecing. She's in love with it and so am I!
     
    Here's a link to Flickr. Arrow right when you get there for detail shots. Thanks for looking! I'm off to MQX tomorrow and so excited to see everyone!
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/larech/10158175903/
  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from judyday in How would you quilt this?   
    Perhaps use a circle template, circle board, or circle-making machine to drop a 5" circle with the center in the tiny free-standing contrasting squares. Your second photo has the perfect one--- the square with the tiny "X" would be the center of the circle and the edge of the circle would kiss the seams between each square. Circles/curves will be a nice contrast to the graphics of the tiny logs and not be dense at all. It would have a modern feel as well--gorgeous quilt with wonderful colors!
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Zora in How would you quilt this?   
    Perhaps use a circle template, circle board, or circle-making machine to drop a 5" circle with the center in the tiny free-standing contrasting squares. Your second photo has the perfect one--- the square with the tiny "X" would be the center of the circle and the edge of the circle would kiss the seams between each square. Circles/curves will be a nice contrast to the graphics of the tiny logs and not be dense at all. It would have a modern feel as well--gorgeous quilt with wonderful colors!
  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from T Row Studio in How would you quilt this?   
    Perhaps use a circle template, circle board, or circle-making machine to drop a 5" circle with the center in the tiny free-standing contrasting squares. Your second photo has the perfect one--- the square with the tiny "X" would be the center of the circle and the edge of the circle would kiss the seams between each square. Circles/curves will be a nice contrast to the graphics of the tiny logs and not be dense at all. It would have a modern feel as well--gorgeous quilt with wonderful colors!
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in How would you quilt this?   
    Perhaps use a circle template, circle board, or circle-making machine to drop a 5" circle with the center in the tiny free-standing contrasting squares. Your second photo has the perfect one--- the square with the tiny "X" would be the center of the circle and the edge of the circle would kiss the seams between each square. Circles/curves will be a nice contrast to the graphics of the tiny logs and not be dense at all. It would have a modern feel as well--gorgeous quilt with wonderful colors!
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Oma in How would you quilt this?   
    Perhaps use a circle template, circle board, or circle-making machine to drop a 5" circle with the center in the tiny free-standing contrasting squares. Your second photo has the perfect one--- the square with the tiny "X" would be the center of the circle and the edge of the circle would kiss the seams between each square. Circles/curves will be a nice contrast to the graphics of the tiny logs and not be dense at all. It would have a modern feel as well--gorgeous quilt with wonderful colors!
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Grammy in Vintage Double Wedding Ring quilt   
    My customer picked up this vintage DWR top at a local antique mall for $60. The fabric is vintage feed sacks with 1930's solids and everything is hand-pieced except the green four patches. One piece in an edge arc had a hole and she replaced with a scrap of 30's feed sack fabric she inherited from her mom. One or two arc seams were repaired as well. It has some stains and dye transfer from being folded on itself, but she'll use Synthrapol and a mild restoration soap to do the final cleaning after she binds it. Wool batting made everything so nice.
    I did an era-friendly flower design, a double leaf in the yellow football shapes and CC's over pairs of arc piecing. She's in love with it and so am I!
     
    Here's a link to Flickr. Arrow right when you get there for detail shots. Thanks for looking! I'm off to MQX tomorrow and so excited to see everyone!
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/larech/10158175903/
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from JeannieB in Vintage Double Wedding Ring quilt   
    My customer picked up this vintage DWR top at a local antique mall for $60. The fabric is vintage feed sacks with 1930's solids and everything is hand-pieced except the green four patches. One piece in an edge arc had a hole and she replaced with a scrap of 30's feed sack fabric she inherited from her mom. One or two arc seams were repaired as well. It has some stains and dye transfer from being folded on itself, but she'll use Synthrapol and a mild restoration soap to do the final cleaning after she binds it. Wool batting made everything so nice.
    I did an era-friendly flower design, a double leaf in the yellow football shapes and CC's over pairs of arc piecing. She's in love with it and so am I!
     
    Here's a link to Flickr. Arrow right when you get there for detail shots. Thanks for looking! I'm off to MQX tomorrow and so excited to see everyone!
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/larech/10158175903/
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from CrazyAboutQuilting in Photographing quilts   
    Be sure the quilt is hanging flat. Have a stand or hanging system so the quilt is straight and secure. A plus is an invisible hanging system where the clips or clamps are not in the picture.
     
    Use the no-flash setting on the camera while lighting from the top or side so your stitches show. That's the best suggestion to get a good shot of the quilting.
     
    Sometimes a casual arrangement with the quilt artfully laid over a chair gives a better view of the quilting---like a quilting magazine cover.
     
    Photos for your personal or business use are fine if taken by you, but if you're entering quilts in shows, a professional quilt photographer is worth the money.
     
    Kathy from Tamarack Shack photographs her quilts outside all the time---many times on the frozen lake. Take a look at her blog to get a feel for what she does successfully.  http://www.tamarackshack.blogspot.ca/
     
    After taking photos, they can be cropped, color-corrected, sharpened, brightened, etc. so you can get the best shot of each quilt.
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Oma in Photographing quilts   
    Be sure the quilt is hanging flat. Have a stand or hanging system so the quilt is straight and secure. A plus is an invisible hanging system where the clips or clamps are not in the picture.
     
    Use the no-flash setting on the camera while lighting from the top or side so your stitches show. That's the best suggestion to get a good shot of the quilting.
     
    Sometimes a casual arrangement with the quilt artfully laid over a chair gives a better view of the quilting---like a quilting magazine cover.
     
    Photos for your personal or business use are fine if taken by you, but if you're entering quilts in shows, a professional quilt photographer is worth the money.
     
    Kathy from Tamarack Shack photographs her quilts outside all the time---many times on the frozen lake. Take a look at her blog to get a feel for what she does successfully.  http://www.tamarackshack.blogspot.ca/
     
    After taking photos, they can be cropped, color-corrected, sharpened, brightened, etc. so you can get the best shot of each quilt.
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Need help on Design   
    To advance your skills and give you confidence, quilt the diagonal sashings and the squares with easy designs. Find a thread color that will work on all your fabrics and use it throughout. For the sashing, evenly-spaced up/down loops would work. Make sure there's a loop in every spot where the sashings intersect. Stitch all in one direction. Then when you do the ones in the other direction you will overstitch one side of a loop to reach across to the next sashing section. For the HST blocks in between, treat them as squares instead of triangles. If you have a stencil that fits, mark and stitch the same design in each square. If the stencil is too small, mark and stitch it then echo the outside until the block is filled. Another option in the squares is CCs/Line Dancing. Because the blocks are large you'll really be able to see your designs. Here's a link to Line Dancing by Diana Philips. You can get the idea and practice on some graph paper to give you the rhythm. Share when you finish and have fun!
    https://www.google.com/search?q=Diana+phillips+line+dancing&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=1067&tbm=isch&imgil=0-c4PLA0qkrwpM%253A%253B1gNJIA6BpnQ21M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.intelligentquilting.com%25252F 
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Enchanted Quilting in Need help on Design   
    To advance your skills and give you confidence, quilt the diagonal sashings and the squares with easy designs. Find a thread color that will work on all your fabrics and use it throughout. For the sashing, evenly-spaced up/down loops would work. Make sure there's a loop in every spot where the sashings intersect. Stitch all in one direction. Then when you do the ones in the other direction you will overstitch one side of a loop to reach across to the next sashing section. For the HST blocks in between, treat them as squares instead of triangles. If you have a stencil that fits, mark and stitch the same design in each square. If the stencil is too small, mark and stitch it then echo the outside until the block is filled. Another option in the squares is CCs/Line Dancing. Because the blocks are large you'll really be able to see your designs. Here's a link to Line Dancing by Diana Philips. You can get the idea and practice on some graph paper to give you the rhythm. Share when you finish and have fun!
    https://www.google.com/search?q=Diana+phillips+line+dancing&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=1067&tbm=isch&imgil=0-c4PLA0qkrwpM%253A%253B1gNJIA6BpnQ21M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.intelligentquilting.com%25252F 
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Regina in Need help on Design   
    To advance your skills and give you confidence, quilt the diagonal sashings and the squares with easy designs. Find a thread color that will work on all your fabrics and use it throughout. For the sashing, evenly-spaced up/down loops would work. Make sure there's a loop in every spot where the sashings intersect. Stitch all in one direction. Then when you do the ones in the other direction you will overstitch one side of a loop to reach across to the next sashing section. For the HST blocks in between, treat them as squares instead of triangles. If you have a stencil that fits, mark and stitch the same design in each square. If the stencil is too small, mark and stitch it then echo the outside until the block is filled. Another option in the squares is CCs/Line Dancing. Because the blocks are large you'll really be able to see your designs. Here's a link to Line Dancing by Diana Philips. You can get the idea and practice on some graph paper to give you the rhythm. Share when you finish and have fun!
    https://www.google.com/search?q=Diana+phillips+line+dancing&espv=2&biw=1920&bih=1067&tbm=isch&imgil=0-c4PLA0qkrwpM%253A%253B1gNJIA6BpnQ21M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.intelligentquilting.com%25252F 
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from fallenfar in How to hide fabric thread under sandwich ????   
    A number 10 or 12 steel crochet hook will do the trick after quilting, as others have advised. Fish it through the closest seam or stitch hole and pull the thread through.
     
    I just finished a lattice quilt in navy and white where the raveling navy thread was everywhere. They're hard to control because even when you groom the threads, more appear just by tugging the top. I have a new tool for repositioning the threads. I use a long, double-sided emery board. After the quilt is loaded and straightened, and before it's quilted, I groom the threads out by reaching under the top from the side or through the rollers from the front and "sweeping" the emery board against the thread. I either remove it completely or push it under adjacent darker fabric. The thread sticks to the sandpapery emery board-- works like a charm! 
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to CindyT in Just a simple Snowman/Penguin quilt from a panel   
    I haven't had much time to piece this year, but I did manage to finish this UFO from a few years ago.  I took a class through our guild on sashings, and decided to try using the ruler I bought on the panel these blocks came from.  Pretty happy little quilt with all over quilting, but nothing fancy.  It's hanging in my studio for now.


  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to Gail O in NQR - Happy Holidays   
    Before things get too hectic . . . .
     
    Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, safe travels, and may your future be filled with joy and laughter.
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Leida Glez in quilt patch update motor. Pantograph   
    I believe there is a Facebook group for Quilt Path owners which is very helpful and questions are answered quickly. Someone in the group will need to share a link and invitation for you to join.
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from anniemueller in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one.  
     
    Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 
     
    As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.
     
    As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh! 
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from celinedum2004 in colored wholecloth   
    Pre-printed wholecloth designs are usually offered on white or cream fabric, as you've found out. An option would be to purchase a paper pattern that you then transfer the design yourself to your chosen fabric. You will need a lightbox with a strong enough light to show through the fabric. Darkening the design with a Sharpie can help with the tracing. Use a blue water-erase pen for the marking so the lines don't fade. Then after quilting the marks are soaked to remove. That's quite a hand-quilting project---I love the French boutis quilts. Usually made of one fabric and beautiful!
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Marti10245 in Can you float a quilt back? or How do you deal with non-straight edges   
    Wow. I'm with Lynn on this one.  
     
    Here's a thought, though. You can place the quilt top anywhere on the backer that works. If someone gives me a backer that is way larger than the top, I load the top as far to one side as I can an still have enough at that edge for my clamps. That may mean that the excess backer on one side is 3" and the opposite 12". This option saves fabric and might leave her enough fabric for binding something. 
     
    As for your diagram--I agree that you might want to load it the recommended way with the seam parallel to the rollers. Snug the top to one side as close to the backer edge as you're comfortable. That way she'll have as much usable fabric as possible left when you finish. Charge her $10 for this awkward load because if you load it with the backer seam horizontal, you'll need to take some care to make sure the excess backer is out of the way (if it hangs down it can be run over by your wheels and leave nasty marks) or it can unroll wonky and you will have issues controlling the side tension. If you load the backer with the seam vertical, you'll want to mark straight across both widths of fabric to have a line to pin to the rollers. You'll still be dealing with that extra flap of fabric and need to keep it from getting in the way.
     
    As for adding a strip of muslin to even up the backer--let her do this. Industry standard is $10 per seam for piecing backers. I can't imagine she wants to pay an extra $20 to save some precious inches of fabric. Sheeeesh! 
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