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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from RosemaryJ08 in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from micajah in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Liam in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LisaC in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Pepsi Girl in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from AnnP in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbustle in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from NHDeb in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from appr216 in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from whitepinesquilter in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from lkl in Customer Service   
    A local longarmer with a Lenny called me, knowing I had a Millie and could I come over and "help" her figure out what was wrong? What's the problem? She wouldn't pick up a stitch. Did you go over the checklist? Yes. Did you call APQS? No. Helphelphelp I'm getting behind!!! I drive over (10 miles), look at the machine (so dirty and soooo may set-up errors--yikes!) and immediately see her needle is in backward. No "thank you", she hustled me out the door so fast I got dizzy! That "service call" would have cost her $200 plus travel time. Luckily I live within driving distance of Barbara Mayfield and it gives me vast peace of mind, but I still fix my own. The other side? My nightmare of a spa treatment at APQS several years ago that resulted in me using a loaner for 4 months. Please realize that there are very few "traveling magicians" that are trained on every longarm and will gladly come to your home. My Gammill friends locally have to hand-deliver the head to Eastern Washington or pay $$big bucks$$ to someone traveling 200 miles for a house call. They pay him for a full day's work because he's away from his base. They do it, but don't like it much. The repairman comes to this side of the state a couple of times a year so he sets up work and it cuts the cost by a bit. Dave Jones is the only one I know who makes house calls, besides Barb. If "traveling tech" was a viable career, someone would be doing it!  
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Irma and Millie   
    With help from at least one other person, remove the back take-up roller and the leveler roller. I believe there is a set-screw that will loosen with an allen or hex wrench and release the rollers. Unplug what's appropriate and slide the head off the back of the carriage. Figure out a way that the head will be right side up and the wheels and SR will be protected before you set it down. If you aren't using the bathtub to store water, that might be a good place to put her. Pack around with towels and sheets so she doesn't tip. The head can be damaged by back-and-forth action if the motor clangs around inside the hood. Sending fervent wishes that you and your property are safe after Irma passes.
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Irma and Millie   
    With help from at least one other person, remove the back take-up roller and the leveler roller. I believe there is a set-screw that will loosen with an allen or hex wrench and release the rollers. Unplug what's appropriate and slide the head off the back of the carriage. Figure out a way that the head will be right side up and the wheels and SR will be protected before you set it down. If you aren't using the bathtub to store water, that might be a good place to put her. Pack around with towels and sheets so she doesn't tip. The head can be damaged by back-and-forth action if the motor clangs around inside the hood. Sending fervent wishes that you and your property are safe after Irma passes.
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Basting   
    You can easily baste by setting your stitches-per-inch at 8 and stitching in manual mode. The needle goes so slowly that you can move the machine to make extra long stitches. I try for about a half-inch long. 
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Primitive1 in Making Piano Key Border & Best Quilt Piecing Book   
    For accuracy and stability, foundation-piece a piano key border. Use thin muslin for the foundation, mark two-inch increments and a quarter-inch outside edge (like with paper piecing) with a blue wash-away marker, and add your strips, sewing on the line. Be sure the outside quarter inch is covered. Trim the edge on the line when your strip is dne. The lining fabric will stabilize the border. This can also be done with paper, removing it after stitching. 
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Bonnie in Ok in Making Piano Key Border & Best Quilt Piecing Book   
    For accuracy and stability, foundation-piece a piano key border. Use thin muslin for the foundation, mark two-inch increments and a quarter-inch outside edge (like with paper piecing) with a blue wash-away marker, and add your strips, sewing on the line. Be sure the outside quarter inch is covered. Trim the edge on the line when your strip is dne. The lining fabric will stabilize the border. This can also be done with paper, removing it after stitching. 
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Quilt Topper Tool for Sale   
    I'll jump in here with some info. It spans and sits on the rollers so one made for a Millie won't fit a Lenny. The span between the rollers is different and since it snaps on the leveler roller for stability, the roller diameter must be the same. If it has the wheel, you can make many sizes of concentric circles from the front. If it doesn't have the wheel, it's a holder for pattern boards (blocks only) and allows you to trace the boards from the front. The arm attaches to the head without drilling any new holes. If she doesn't have the original instructions, we can send them to the new owner.
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Pantograph designs appear squarish when stitched out   
    You might need to have the wheels adjusted if the machine is super-sluggish. But take a deep breath and allow yourself to be bad until you practice enough to be good. The X/Y set up of wheels running horizontal and vertical means your machine LOVES to go horizontal and vertical. It's easy--just a push will move the head and it will stay on course until it stops, never veering off the line. Now diagonals? Not so pretty. You must overcome the natural tendency of the head to go h-and-v. This requires training your muscles. Boring...but necessary. It becomes automatic when you put in the hours. Your brains sends the message that "now we're going in a circle. That will mean a tiny nudge this way, another, another, another"---you'll have four spots in a circle where you will need to apply that little smidge of extra force/speed needed to make a nice curve. Practice (arghh) will do the trick. Make circles---just like learning cursive years ago. Practice big "O"s-- it may take 400---or 4000---but they will get better with every one you stitch. Do overalls of loops, making them as big and as round as you can. Another good practice is curvy stencils. Staying on the line will become ingrained. Good luck and you'll see improvement very quickly.
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Marie0722 in Vintage Quilt Tops   
    Don't be afraid! These vintage tops are being quilted/finished all the time. Inspect the fabric for open seams and thin spots. Back with muslin if it seems delicate, float it, decide on an era-friendly quilting plan---and go! I rescued this one from a local antique mall. There was evidence that it had been sandwiched and hand-quilted along one end. The buyer must have realized the top itself would sell better if the quilting was removed. There are still "ghosts" of the hand-quilting left and because of that it's very dear to me. 

  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Questions on Quilt Backing   
    I wonder if they want three pieces for the back because they have it figured so the embroidered designs miss the seams that way. Basting it on the longarm will be much easier than pinning. There are several methods, but use a thicker and slippery thread (like a poly) in a contrasting color. I'd remove the stitches after hooping but before embroidering. The stitches will remove very easily. Here's my map for basting---a fake grid with lines about four inches apart. This allows you to avoid long verticals. Don't plan to baste on the diagonal. 

  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Ughh - help please - stain - update   
    Carbona Stain Devils formula for ink removal got gel pen out of a vintage top in the same situation. It was my item so I advanced through all the usual remedies and this one worked. Apply, back with a paper towel, and pat it with your finger to push it through the fabric. Repeat. It works best if it's just the fabric and not the batting and backer as well. It will need to be washed when you finish because it does have a solvent residual smell. It can be found on the laundry aisle in a rack of little yellow bottles and Joanns used to carry the line as well. Good luck!
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Suggestions to Diversify?   
    You could try---
     
    Teaching piecing. Drawbacks---finding a place for classes. Advantages---a built-in customer base for your quilting business.
     
    Teaching DSM and longarm quilting. Drawbacks---you might be training your competition. 
     
    Make quilts to sell. Drawbacks-- it's hard to sell a quality quilt on etsy and get your investment out. Commission quilts are good if you get cost-of-materials up-front and a signed contract for the rest.
     
    Pattern design. Digitized quilting designs, freemotion quilting designs, or original quilt patterns. Good money-makers.
     
    Design and make rulers, templates, and stencils. This is more involved and there's lots of competition. 
     
    Offer a BOM class locally or on line---you must do your own original design but you sell the full pattern or offer to sell it in installments on a blog. This also works with a mystery quilt. You'll have students in line for quilting if you have a gorgeous sample.
     
    If you have two machines, do freehand/custom on one and also rent it. Put a computer on the other for extra income since you'll need to be there with a renter and also when you're using the computerized machine.
     
    Good luck, find your niche, and make some money!  
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Vintage Quilt Tops   
    Don't be afraid! These vintage tops are being quilted/finished all the time. Inspect the fabric for open seams and thin spots. Back with muslin if it seems delicate, float it, decide on an era-friendly quilting plan---and go! I rescued this one from a local antique mall. There was evidence that it had been sandwiched and hand-quilted along one end. The buyer must have realized the top itself would sell better if the quilting was removed. There are still "ghosts" of the hand-quilting left and because of that it's very dear to me. 

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