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ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Marie0722 in Vintage Quilt Tops   
    Don't be afraid! These vintage tops are being quilted/finished all the time. Inspect the fabric for open seams and thin spots. Back with muslin if it seems delicate, float it, decide on an era-friendly quilting plan---and go! I rescued this one from a local antique mall. There was evidence that it had been sandwiched and hand-quilted along one end. The buyer must have realized the top itself would sell better if the quilting was removed. There are still "ghosts" of the hand-quilting left and because of that it's very dear to me. 

  2. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Vintage Quilt Tops   
    Don't be afraid! These vintage tops are being quilted/finished all the time. Inspect the fabric for open seams and thin spots. Back with muslin if it seems delicate, float it, decide on an era-friendly quilting plan---and go! I rescued this one from a local antique mall. There was evidence that it had been sandwiched and hand-quilted along one end. The buyer must have realized the top itself would sell better if the quilting was removed. There are still "ghosts" of the hand-quilting left and because of that it's very dear to me. 

  3. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from yankiequilter in Vintage Quilt Tops   
    Don't be afraid! These vintage tops are being quilted/finished all the time. Inspect the fabric for open seams and thin spots. Back with muslin if it seems delicate, float it, decide on an era-friendly quilting plan---and go! I rescued this one from a local antique mall. There was evidence that it had been sandwiched and hand-quilted along one end. The buyer must have realized the top itself would sell better if the quilting was removed. There are still "ghosts" of the hand-quilting left and because of that it's very dear to me. 

  4. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from lisae in Vintage Quilt Tops   
    Don't be afraid! These vintage tops are being quilted/finished all the time. Inspect the fabric for open seams and thin spots. Back with muslin if it seems delicate, float it, decide on an era-friendly quilting plan---and go! I rescued this one from a local antique mall. There was evidence that it had been sandwiched and hand-quilted along one end. The buyer must have realized the top itself would sell better if the quilting was removed. There are still "ghosts" of the hand-quilting left and because of that it's very dear to me. 

  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Vintage Quilt Tops   
    Don't be afraid! These vintage tops are being quilted/finished all the time. Inspect the fabric for open seams and thin spots. Back with muslin if it seems delicate, float it, decide on an era-friendly quilting plan---and go! I rescued this one from a local antique mall. There was evidence that it had been sandwiched and hand-quilted along one end. The buyer must have realized the top itself would sell better if the quilting was removed. There are still "ghosts" of the hand-quilting left and because of that it's very dear to me. 

  6. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Questions on Quilt Backing   
    I wonder if they want three pieces for the back because they have it figured so the embroidered designs miss the seams that way. Basting it on the longarm will be much easier than pinning. There are several methods, but use a thicker and slippery thread (like a poly) in a contrasting color. I'd remove the stitches after hooping but before embroidering. The stitches will remove very easily. Here's my map for basting---a fake grid with lines about four inches apart. This allows you to avoid long verticals. Don't plan to baste on the diagonal. 

  7. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from MaryQuiltsTx in Questions on Quilt Backing   
    I wonder if they want three pieces for the back because they have it figured so the embroidered designs miss the seams that way. Basting it on the longarm will be much easier than pinning. There are several methods, but use a thicker and slippery thread (like a poly) in a contrasting color. I'd remove the stitches after hooping but before embroidering. The stitches will remove very easily. Here's my map for basting---a fake grid with lines about four inches apart. This allows you to avoid long verticals. Don't plan to baste on the diagonal. 

  8. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Questions on Quilt Backing   
    I wonder if they want three pieces for the back because they have it figured so the embroidered designs miss the seams that way. Basting it on the longarm will be much easier than pinning. There are several methods, but use a thicker and slippery thread (like a poly) in a contrasting color. I'd remove the stitches after hooping but before embroidering. The stitches will remove very easily. Here's my map for basting---a fake grid with lines about four inches apart. This allows you to avoid long verticals. Don't plan to baste on the diagonal. 

  9. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from InesR in Questions on Quilt Backing   
    I wonder if they want three pieces for the back because they have it figured so the embroidered designs miss the seams that way. Basting it on the longarm will be much easier than pinning. There are several methods, but use a thicker and slippery thread (like a poly) in a contrasting color. I'd remove the stitches after hooping but before embroidering. The stitches will remove very easily. Here's my map for basting---a fake grid with lines about four inches apart. This allows you to avoid long verticals. Don't plan to baste on the diagonal. 

  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from RosemaryJ08 in Questions on Quilt Backing   
    I wonder if they want three pieces for the back because they have it figured so the embroidered designs miss the seams that way. Basting it on the longarm will be much easier than pinning. There are several methods, but use a thicker and slippery thread (like a poly) in a contrasting color. I'd remove the stitches after hooping but before embroidering. The stitches will remove very easily. Here's my map for basting---a fake grid with lines about four inches apart. This allows you to avoid long verticals. Don't plan to baste on the diagonal. 

  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilting Heidi in Help Milly won't turn on   
    Check for a blown fuse. The fuse cubby on mine is at the back, right side just above the cone holder for the bobbin winder. There should be extra fuses inside. Check your manual for location and how to open the drawer.
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from anniemueller in Needle size/thread snags/unpicking disaster   
    I know this is a heart-breaker.
    I think the snags aren't really snags, but they are dis-placement of the woven threads on heavily printed/top dyed fabric. Thimbleberries fabrics are very prone to this. When the needle enters the fabric it pulls the adjacent thread just enough to nudge it out of place. The white you see on top is the part of the thread that was under the adjacent thread and did not get dyed. Those stripes of light coming down from your edge-stitching in the second photo show this perfectly.
    A smaller needle didn't look like it helped--nor did a new needle.
    With some fabrics you can use a Pigma pen to color in the offending areas.
    This can also happen when piecing--and think how much smaller a DSM needle is compared to the needle we use.
    All I can think to tell you is to warn your customer when you are faced with these fabrics. It won't happen every time. Sorry for your anguish--we want it all to be perfect.
  13. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Oma in Yea for rulers   
    Thanks Bonnie and Terry! Hope you love them!
     
    I just used one of the arcs to mark big CCs in a seven inch square. It's "the wedding quilt" and I should finish the quilting today. Then I'll stitch the binding on while it's on the frame. I'm only a week behind in preparations!
  14. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Need a little pep talk - share your stories of starting out!   
    You can do it you can do it you can do it! There's a pep talk!
    The key to the whole thing is just one thing--customers.
    Sounds lame and simple, but it's the truth.
    Do all the things you need to do to build a customer base.
    Join guilds, (and be sure you make friends and contribute there and not be thought that you're there to troll for customers).
    Make friends at the LQS.
    Be generous.
    Build your skills so you have lots to offer.
    I think you're on track and have a realistic grasp of what it will take. As you improve and do more customer quilting you'll find a niche--either you'll fill a local need for a specific technique (like E2E or custom) or you'll find the type of quilting you love and that makes your heart sing--and you'll get so good at it that the customers will seek you out.
    I practiced and quilted for friends for five months before a business card at an LQS brought me my first customer. It was slow going the first year and I learned so much quilting customer quilts. The second year I doubled the first in net income and number of quilts. Third year I doubled the second year and reach the maximum I'm willing to take in per month. I started in 2005 and love it more every year!
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Attaching binding with your longarm   
    Sewing binding with the longarm is very quick and easy. I charge a flat $30 for everything up to a Queen. A bit more for a King. It usually takes me a half-hour to do it so it's good money. I use regular folded binding and a C-shaped template Dennis made for me. The hopping foot sits inside the C and the two sides keep the edge flat and aligned no matter which side you're stitching. I start at the middle of the right side because I stitch the classic invisible join---also while it's loaded--and need access to the ends. It comes off the frame completed. No finishing the join on my domestic. I think I've shared that technique before if you want to do a search.
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from DianeMc in Using rulers with George   
    I'm not sure if it's searchable, but this topic was discussed a while ago. Until someone who uses rulers with their George chimes in, I remember that they used grippers on the back of the ruler to securely position it, and then held the ruler while moving the fabric along the edge of the ruler. I was amazed at the ingenuity and skill needed to use a ruler this way!
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Kwiltr in To Float or Not to Float...   
    I float all tops. This allows me to keep the top square on the frame all the way. I mark the edges of the top on the top, unused leader and hit the mark as I advance. I use lots of pins to stabilize the top, but many quilters now baste the entire quilt first. Pinning is faster and I feel I have more control. You'll find what works best for you and may do a combination of techniques on different quilts.
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from AnnP in Millennium 30 inches   
    I think 30" is overkill unless you have a computer that can fill that space. I assume the frame will be wider, requiring more square footage in a studio. Freehand can still be done of course. Not for me, but maybe for others.
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from IBQLTN2 in Who has their paint chips and fabrics for Bonnie Hunters Mystery this year?   
    Just like last year with Bonnie's Tuscany quilt, I get the fabric together and download the steps. But I wait for the reveal before I start. If I don't like it, I don't make it. Last years was lovely and it's on my list to make. I like this years colors and will pull fabric for it. As a matter of fact, I have a customer's Allietare on the frame right now.
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Bonnie in Ok in Stymied!! Quilt finished New Photo   
    Scrolls. Hoping you can see the triple curls in each section.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/larech/15798056596/in/dateposted/
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Debi in Stymied!! Quilt finished New Photo   
    Scrolls. Hoping you can see the triple curls in each section.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/larech/15798056596/in/dateposted/
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LisaC in Wife (Non-Quilter) Just Doesn't Understand   
    No good deed goes unpunished!
    Don't let your wife write checks that you can't pay!
    Cliche' advice is over. 
  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar reacted to delld in Stay Safe in the the Path of Matthew!!!!   
    If you were closer I would be at your house!!!
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Quilta93 in Attaching binding with your longarm   
    Sewing binding with the longarm is very quick and easy. I charge a flat $30 for everything up to a Queen. A bit more for a King. It usually takes me a half-hour to do it so it's good money. I use regular folded binding and a C-shaped template Dennis made for me. The hopping foot sits inside the C and the two sides keep the edge flat and aligned no matter which side you're stitching. I start at the middle of the right side because I stitch the classic invisible join---also while it's loaded--and need access to the ends. It comes off the frame completed. No finishing the join on my domestic. I think I've shared that technique before if you want to do a search.
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in Attaching binding with your longarm   
    Sewing binding with the longarm is very quick and easy. I charge a flat $30 for everything up to a Queen. A bit more for a King. It usually takes me a half-hour to do it so it's good money. I use regular folded binding and a C-shaped template Dennis made for me. The hopping foot sits inside the C and the two sides keep the edge flat and aligned no matter which side you're stitching. I start at the middle of the right side because I stitch the classic invisible join---also while it's loaded--and need access to the ends. It comes off the frame completed. No finishing the join on my domestic. I think I've shared that technique before if you want to do a search.
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