April W

removing blue ink?

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Hi April, if these are blocks you bought preprinted, recently, meaning the last couple years. it will wash out using Orvis or Quilt Soap.. mine did.

If from many years ago, or the ones you iron on yourself.. There were suggestions about it several weeks ago, and I\'ve no idea what they were, nor what the title was of the thread.. someone will come in and give you more info. Good Luck

RitaR

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April...if this is a new design....printed since say mid 1980\'s or so...the blue will just come out in the first wash. Just use a rather luke warm water plain no soap for the first washing. Its printed with a substance similar to the blue pens we use today in quilt marking.

If its an older printed fabric pre-1980\'s there is a chance it will never come out...the older printing were permanent and were meant for hand quilting so you could cover the marks with the thread.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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Thanks for chiming in so quickly girls...I have a feeling its too late for her quilt. She had it some time before she even got it cross stitched and thinks she bought it sometime in the last 18 to 20 years. I was just hoping to help since I machine quilted it for her.

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April....if you have this off the frame...take a damp towel, rag, or even paper-towel...and touch one of the blue dots....if it starts to fade right away...your in the green if not well...it might take a bit more soaking, but I wouldn\'t give up yet.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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She has already soaked it in cold water and didn\'t think they even faded any. I had mentioned soaking the whole thing as soon as she got the binding on to see if they would come out. It\'s a king sized \'whole cloth\' design on three panels and she did an awesome job of cross stitch.

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this one may need a bit more warm water than cold...the older inks didn\'t come out in cold water. But then she will still need to careful of the threads. I hope all comes out okay...if the spots don\'t come out first time maybe they will fade with each washing.


Bonnie Botts

APQS Sales Rep - Certified Service Technician

APQS Millennium 2006---MJ

APQS Millennium 2004---Lucy

405-533-1025 home

518-935-3832 cell

"Absolute rules are about as useless in making quilts as they are in raising children" Carter Houck---1992

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I found this on Wekipedia,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

Formulation

Main ingredients, from the material safety data sheet, are:

50%: Stoddard solvent (mineral spirits, somewhat similar to, but not the same as, kerosene)

25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant, carbon dioxide is used now to reduce considerable flammability)

15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)

10-%: Inert ingredients

The German version of the mandatory EU safety sheet lists the following safety relevant ingredients:

60-80%: Heavy Naphtha (petroleum product), hydrogen treated

1-5%: Carbon dioxide

It further lists flammability and effects to the human skin when repeatedly exposed to WD-40 as risks when using WD-40. Nitrile rubber gloves and safety glasses should be used. Water is unsuitable for extinguishing burning WD-40.

There is a popular urban legend that the main ingredient in WD-40 is fish oil.[2] Although it is unknown whether the formula contains fish oil, material safety data sheets for the product show that the main ingredient is Stoddard solvent, not fish oil.[3]:)

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Wow, talk about getting off the subject. I thought about starting a new thread for this, but this is sooooooo unquiltsubject that I am just sticking it here.

I got this via e-mail from someone . . .

Subject: WD40

A friend sent this to me, and when I read the "shower door" part I tried it. It\'s the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. Mine is plastic, not glass and it\'s a miracle! Then I tried my stove top.... it\'s now shinier than it\'s ever been. I\'m amazed. )

Here are some of the uses:

Protects silver from tarnishing

Cleans and lubricates guitar strings

Gets oil spots off concrete driveways

Gives floors that \'just-waxed\' sheen without making it slippery

Keeps flies off cows

Restores and cleans chalkboards

Removes lipstick stains

Loosens stubborn zippers

Untangles jewelry chains

Removes stains from stainless steel sinks

Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill

Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing

Removes tomato stains from clothing

Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots

Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors

Keeps scissors working smoothly

Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes

Gives a children\'s play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide

Lubricates gear shift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers

Rids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises

Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open

Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close

Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers

Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles

Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans

Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons and bicycles for eas handling

Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly

Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools

Removes splattered grease on stove

Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging

Lubricates prosthetic limbs

Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell)

Removes all traces of duct tape

I have even heard of folks spraying it on their arms, hands, knees to relieve arthritis pain.

One fellow claims spraying it on fishing lures attracts fish.

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Originally posted by AnnHenry

I got this via e-mail from someone . . .

Subject: WD40

A friend sent this to me.......

Here are some of the uses:

I have even heard of folks spraying it on their arms, hands, knees to relieve arthritis pain.

One fellow claims spraying it on fishing lures attracts fish.

Sure, I do believe that WD-40 is a good product and works on lots of things to clean, shiny and remove the squeaks, but be careful about believing everything you read in an email. WD 40 does not have fish oil. it\'s main ingredient is mineral spirits (aka paint thinner). I surely would not advice my friends and family that WD40 is the end all cure all... especially not rubbing it on my skin for insect bites and relieve arthritis. No way!

My mother sent me this exact email a few months ago and (yes==she sends me lots of JUNK mail) and I got mad at her for sending this one...not only to me, but to all of her friends and family -- especially the part about rubbing it on skin for arthritis and insects! :mad: I sent her the link to WD 40 MSDS so she knows exactly what it\'s made of; not fish oil. Be careful folks and don\'t rub this chemical liberally on your skin!

I am not much of a fisherman, but I know that handling lures is a real tricky thing. You\'re not supposed to touch them too much because the fish can sense it\'s not a natural thing. Most fish bite at lures out of instinct, not because they\'re hungry, but I would think that a fish probably wouldn\'t like the smell of WD40.


"Of all the things a woman's hands have made---The quilt so lightly thrown across her bed---The quilt that keeps her loved ones warm---Is woven of her love and dreams and thread." excerpt from The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt by Carrie A. Hall
 

:rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

Shana in North Pole, Alaska ---- The Farthest North APQS Sales Rep  
 Always quilting with her faithful friend, Mademoiselle Madeleine Millennium, Bliss-fully skating gracefully...and having lots of fun with IntelliQuilter

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Sew Girl Jo, I see you are a newbie. You'll probably have better luck finding answers to your question if you start a new thread (sorry for the pun). Just click on "topic" and ask away. This thread is titled "Removing Blue Ink".

Here, let me start it for you, OK?


Boni

Statler

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"Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content." Helen Keller

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