Sharon Deming

Member
  • Content Count

    186
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    14

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from KylieShorta in Blog post and quilter's strip poker   
    Hi Kylie - thanks for your sweet comment. The art / craft / hobby / calling of making quilts is at least 3,000 years old. Yes, we meet together to hone skills, get inspired to try something new, gather people to bus to a quilt show, etc. BUT quilting really isn't about all of that when you look between the layers. It's about loving family (and making sure every member has several quilts) and loving each other. It's about the fabric and pieces and journeys of life. Quilters love to sew - but, I believe, for most of us, we love doing it with each other, as family. My favorite day of the month is when my friend Sally comes to spend the day with me in the studio - sewing and laughing and sharing and supporting each other through life.
    My routine is changing. The Lord has drawn me aside from designing quilts, developing patterns, and from most quilting jobs, to focus on making quilts for teens who have been uprooted from their homes due to their parents' arrests or other reasons, and are waiting to be placed in foster care. Check out Isaiah 1:17 House. My goal is 12 quilts this year for them. Sally is working with me, also, so I expect we will produce many more than that.
    This is all happening along with being enrolled in Bible College - at the age of 76! Yikes. I can hardly wait to find out how the Lord will weave this all together!
    Blessings and a beautiful day!
  2. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from dianne31331 in roller brake   
    The purpose of the brake is to keep the roller from moving, so be sure to release the brake before you advance or "rewind" your quilt.  You should have received an angled "Allen" wrench with your APQS machine. You may find that over time, the brake handle doesn't hold the rollers as firmly as it once did. The angled wrench is used to set the handle in a position that will enable it to hold firmly. If you purchased a used machine, you may or may not have the instructions for this, but you can find info with a quick forum or google search.
    And you are correct, there are NO stupid questions. We ALL had to learn about the brake!
    Be blessed as you fall in love with longarm quilting!
  3. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from imaward in roller brake   
    The purpose of the brake is to keep the roller from moving, so be sure to release the brake before you advance or "rewind" your quilt.  You should have received an angled "Allen" wrench with your APQS machine. You may find that over time, the brake handle doesn't hold the rollers as firmly as it once did. The angled wrench is used to set the handle in a position that will enable it to hold firmly. If you purchased a used machine, you may or may not have the instructions for this, but you can find info with a quick forum or google search.
    And you are correct, there are NO stupid questions. We ALL had to learn about the brake!
    Be blessed as you fall in love with longarm quilting!
  4. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Joyce   
    I understand what you are feeling. We put our talent and Hearts into our work, and we want that love and care to be appreciated. Unfortunately, not everyone is taught to be grateful and appreciative for gifts of any kind. Chalk it up to her forgetfulness or lack of character. But please, continue to share your love and quilting with others. I encourage you to be sure to put a label on all of your quilts, including baby gifts, that identify YOU as well as your blessing for the gift receiver. Eighty years from now, your work may eventually be appreciated by someone who picks up your quilt at an estate sale or flea-market. Maybe include a picture of you quilting the quilt at the longarm, or of your piecing the quilt and a personal note of congratulations along with your quilt. At least you will know they DO know that it is handmade by you personally. Blessings!
  5. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Poor quality backing fabric?   
    You are not doing anything wrong. My very biased opinion is that the wide backs are "economical" for a reason - manufacturers still need to make a profit so quality suffers.  If I get a chance to encourage a customer to make her/his backing from regular yardage, I will. The issue is with the wide back, not the batting! The holes will "heal" over time. Washing will help - but not all quilts will be washed. When you take the quilt off the frame, let it rest (unfolded) for a couple of days if you can before returning it. The holes will probably diminish some. Reassure your customer that the holes will close over time. When quilting a wide back, I often use a one-size smaller needle - if the thread choice and type of quilt will allow - to make smaller holes. You are doing fine. I keep Warm and Natural and Warm and Plush on the roll. No problem with consistency - always the same.
  6. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from dbams in Need help identifying hardware and features of a long arm A-1 923.   
    I am so sorry to hear that your mother has passed away. Mother's are our lifeline to reality, sometimes. You will be okay. I am praying for you and your family.
    About her longarm: My suggestion is to locate the serial number on the machine head and call customer service at the A-1 company. They can tell you how old the machine is and possibly a resale value. From the dust on the machine, it may have not been used for several years (?), so be sure to tell buyers that. Don't try to run it without servicing it. Check with longarm dealers or sewing machine dealers for people in the area who could come to service it. If you are in NE Tenn, I know just the right guy.  Here is a link to the A-1 contact info: http://www.a1quiltingmachines.com/contact.php.
    When you are ready to let people know about it and the other quilting supplies, contact the local quilting guilds. The members are always looking for a good deal on supplies! Just google "quilting guilds near me"
     
  7. Like
    Sharon Deming reacted to Gator in How to do a quilting class at a resort?   
    Congrats, you will do a great job.  Wish I was a snowbird, Michiagan was cold, cold and still cold this season.    Sharon is a great quilter to listen to, she does beautiful work!!!  Her suggestions are spot on.   I've done most of my  teaching at quilt shops.
  8. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from Gator in How to do a quilting class at a resort?   
    Good for you! I do a good bit of teaching quilting classes and have a few thoughts. I assume from the subject of your post that you will teach at a resort, rather than at a quilt store. I also assume that the resort management (or you, yourself) are aware that there are people at the resort who are quilters or who sew. I sure would not want to see you go to the expense and effort of developing a class just to have no one sign up, or have folks interested but do not have a machine to sew with. You may want to explore with the resort about advertising the class to draw outsiders into the resort to go to the class. Are there quilt stores in your area? Google them and check out what they charge for their classes. That might give you an idea of what the market will bear in that area.
    I suggest a class no longer than 3 or 4 hours, something easy, and that can be finished or nearly finished within that time. Make a finished product well ahead of time so a picture can be posted with the invitation. Since this is a resort and not a quilt store, it may be good to offer a kit at extra cost. I usually have a prep-sheet with yardage and pre-workshop cutting instructions, and a handout of some sort at the workshop. If you use a copyrighted pattern - you cannot just give the participants a copy of yours, they must own a copy of their own.
    Three, very important things about quilting workshops. People like to have fun at a workshop - laughter is a good thing - keep it lighthearted. YOU are supposed to have fun, too! So no stressing over how you "perform" or whether you do everything "right". Just be a happy quilter who loves to share what she/he knows. AND, don't sell yourself short. Whether you have ever done a workshop before or not - you DO know what you are talking about. So, charge the going rate in the area - don't sell yourself short!
    If you would like to have a discussion about this privately - just message me with your email address.
    Blessings!
     
  9. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from Gail O in How to do a quilting class at a resort?   
    Good for you! I do a good bit of teaching quilting classes and have a few thoughts. I assume from the subject of your post that you will teach at a resort, rather than at a quilt store. I also assume that the resort management (or you, yourself) are aware that there are people at the resort who are quilters or who sew. I sure would not want to see you go to the expense and effort of developing a class just to have no one sign up, or have folks interested but do not have a machine to sew with. You may want to explore with the resort about advertising the class to draw outsiders into the resort to go to the class. Are there quilt stores in your area? Google them and check out what they charge for their classes. That might give you an idea of what the market will bear in that area.
    I suggest a class no longer than 3 or 4 hours, something easy, and that can be finished or nearly finished within that time. Make a finished product well ahead of time so a picture can be posted with the invitation. Since this is a resort and not a quilt store, it may be good to offer a kit at extra cost. I usually have a prep-sheet with yardage and pre-workshop cutting instructions, and a handout of some sort at the workshop. If you use a copyrighted pattern - you cannot just give the participants a copy of yours, they must own a copy of their own.
    Three, very important things about quilting workshops. People like to have fun at a workshop - laughter is a good thing - keep it lighthearted. YOU are supposed to have fun, too! So no stressing over how you "perform" or whether you do everything "right". Just be a happy quilter who loves to share what she/he knows. AND, don't sell yourself short. Whether you have ever done a workshop before or not - you DO know what you are talking about. So, charge the going rate in the area - don't sell yourself short!
    If you would like to have a discussion about this privately - just message me with your email address.
    Blessings!
     
  10. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from dbams in How to do a quilting class at a resort?   
    Good for you! I do a good bit of teaching quilting classes and have a few thoughts. I assume from the subject of your post that you will teach at a resort, rather than at a quilt store. I also assume that the resort management (or you, yourself) are aware that there are people at the resort who are quilters or who sew. I sure would not want to see you go to the expense and effort of developing a class just to have no one sign up, or have folks interested but do not have a machine to sew with. You may want to explore with the resort about advertising the class to draw outsiders into the resort to go to the class. Are there quilt stores in your area? Google them and check out what they charge for their classes. That might give you an idea of what the market will bear in that area.
    I suggest a class no longer than 3 or 4 hours, something easy, and that can be finished or nearly finished within that time. Make a finished product well ahead of time so a picture can be posted with the invitation. Since this is a resort and not a quilt store, it may be good to offer a kit at extra cost. I usually have a prep-sheet with yardage and pre-workshop cutting instructions, and a handout of some sort at the workshop. If you use a copyrighted pattern - you cannot just give the participants a copy of yours, they must own a copy of their own.
    Three, very important things about quilting workshops. People like to have fun at a workshop - laughter is a good thing - keep it lighthearted. YOU are supposed to have fun, too! So no stressing over how you "perform" or whether you do everything "right". Just be a happy quilter who loves to share what she/he knows. AND, don't sell yourself short. Whether you have ever done a workshop before or not - you DO know what you are talking about. So, charge the going rate in the area - don't sell yourself short!
    If you would like to have a discussion about this privately - just message me with your email address.
    Blessings!
     
  11. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from InesR in Pattern samples for customers   
    I use the book-ring and plastic sleeve method. I primarily use pantographs, so I pull the thumbnail image from the seller's website, enlarge it to fit on a regular piece of copy paper, put it in a sleeve protector, and voila. The rings work better than a binder, because I can easily "audition" the printed sample on the quilt top to see if it seems suitable.

  12. Upvote
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from NHDeb in Pattern samples for customers   
    I use the book-ring and plastic sleeve method. I primarily use pantographs, so I pull the thumbnail image from the seller's website, enlarge it to fit on a regular piece of copy paper, put it in a sleeve protector, and voila. The rings work better than a binder, because I can easily "audition" the printed sample on the quilt top to see if it seems suitable.

  13. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from dbams in Pattern samples for customers   
    I use the book-ring and plastic sleeve method. I primarily use pantographs, so I pull the thumbnail image from the seller's website, enlarge it to fit on a regular piece of copy paper, put it in a sleeve protector, and voila. The rings work better than a binder, because I can easily "audition" the printed sample on the quilt top to see if it seems suitable.

  14. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from InesR in Lost my mojo   
    Today, my mojo is saying "Don't bother me - I'm resting." I don't want to start construction on the new quilt, I don't want to quilt. Lately, I have been sorting through the small fabric stash of my dearest friend who passed away about a year ago. Getting it ready to sell. Today all I want to do is sit with her fabric. I miss her. I have things to do for the new quilt, though. I make patterns and construction  handouts for my quilts so I can teach a workshop on them. So there are a few files I create to document yardage calculations, cutting table, etc., EQ8 file to update,  make sure I have all of the border sizes correct, etc. So today, I have my computer with me in the studio. I get to sit with Dorothy (her DNA is all over the fabric), and get some documentation going -- maybe. Or just sit. I will have a satisfying day either way.
  15. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from InesR in Lost my mojo   
    Pamela, It's okay for your mojo to just sit down for a while. It is not required to "be productive" all of the time. You have just come off of the holidays, coping with your husband's surgery and recovery, and whatever else may be going on, and your energy and coping reservoir have been drained. It's okay to rest. When I complete a quilt or have no customer quilts staring at me, I sometimes feel a little lost. I have been known to just go into my studio, sit down at the sewing machine, talk to Miss Margie (Millie), or just look around. Usually, there is something to put away or to read or to touch or something, and my interest begins to be renewed. If you really want to get moving - invite a quilting buddy (someone you don't have to clean house for) to come and spend the day sewing. You will enjoy the company while you get to play with fabric.
    Blessings!
  16. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from Gail O in Lost my mojo   
    Today, my mojo is saying "Don't bother me - I'm resting." I don't want to start construction on the new quilt, I don't want to quilt. Lately, I have been sorting through the small fabric stash of my dearest friend who passed away about a year ago. Getting it ready to sell. Today all I want to do is sit with her fabric. I miss her. I have things to do for the new quilt, though. I make patterns and construction  handouts for my quilts so I can teach a workshop on them. So there are a few files I create to document yardage calculations, cutting table, etc., EQ8 file to update,  make sure I have all of the border sizes correct, etc. So today, I have my computer with me in the studio. I get to sit with Dorothy (her DNA is all over the fabric), and get some documentation going -- maybe. Or just sit. I will have a satisfying day either way.
  17. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from Pepsi Girl in Lost my mojo   
    Pamela, It's okay for your mojo to just sit down for a while. It is not required to "be productive" all of the time. You have just come off of the holidays, coping with your husband's surgery and recovery, and whatever else may be going on, and your energy and coping reservoir have been drained. It's okay to rest. When I complete a quilt or have no customer quilts staring at me, I sometimes feel a little lost. I have been known to just go into my studio, sit down at the sewing machine, talk to Miss Margie (Millie), or just look around. Usually, there is something to put away or to read or to touch or something, and my interest begins to be renewed. If you really want to get moving - invite a quilting buddy (someone you don't have to clean house for) to come and spend the day sewing. You will enjoy the company while you get to play with fabric.
    Blessings!
  18. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from dbams in Lost my mojo   
    Pamela, It's okay for your mojo to just sit down for a while. It is not required to "be productive" all of the time. You have just come off of the holidays, coping with your husband's surgery and recovery, and whatever else may be going on, and your energy and coping reservoir have been drained. It's okay to rest. When I complete a quilt or have no customer quilts staring at me, I sometimes feel a little lost. I have been known to just go into my studio, sit down at the sewing machine, talk to Miss Margie (Millie), or just look around. Usually, there is something to put away or to read or to touch or something, and my interest begins to be renewed. If you really want to get moving - invite a quilting buddy (someone you don't have to clean house for) to come and spend the day sewing. You will enjoy the company while you get to play with fabric.
    Blessings!
  19. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from Gail O in Lost my mojo   
    Pamela, It's okay for your mojo to just sit down for a while. It is not required to "be productive" all of the time. You have just come off of the holidays, coping with your husband's surgery and recovery, and whatever else may be going on, and your energy and coping reservoir have been drained. It's okay to rest. When I complete a quilt or have no customer quilts staring at me, I sometimes feel a little lost. I have been known to just go into my studio, sit down at the sewing machine, talk to Miss Margie (Millie), or just look around. Usually, there is something to put away or to read or to touch or something, and my interest begins to be renewed. If you really want to get moving - invite a quilting buddy (someone you don't have to clean house for) to come and spend the day sewing. You will enjoy the company while you get to play with fabric.
    Blessings!
  20. Upvote
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Innova or Millie?   
    When I was looking for a longarm a few years ago, I wound up narrowing my list to APQS and Innova. So I talked to my super-guru of a sewing machine service guy. He services every sort of longarm, sewing machine, serger, embroidery machine -both domestic and commercial in  a region that includes 4 state. He knows everything. I asked him "If you were going to buy a longarm machine for yourself or a family member, what brand would you choose?" Without hesitating he said there were only 2 brand on his list. #1 is APQS and #2 in Innova. I asked him why he put APQS ahead of Innova. He said that APQS is very easy to service - everything you need to access is right up front. "And besides", he said, "APQS never breaks down."
    Customer service is the best in the business. They will stay with you as long as you need to get an answer to even the dumbest question. Every dealer I have met has been happy, professional, knowledgeable, and accessible. When I checked in your area, there are 3 dealers near Atlanta. My own treasured dealer is Sheridan Carter in Hendersonville, NC.(828) 286-2390. She is hosting a Roadshow on July 21, starting at 1:00 pm. Check the APQS roadshow schedule to see when there is one in your area. A roadshow is a great way to play with all of the machines and get all of your questions answered. Here's the link: https://www.apqs.com/events/?tribe_eventcategory=296.
  21. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from NHDeb in Innova or Millie?   
    When I was looking for a longarm a few years ago, I wound up narrowing my list to APQS and Innova. So I talked to my super-guru of a sewing machine service guy. He services every sort of longarm, sewing machine, serger, embroidery machine -both domestic and commercial in  a region that includes 4 state. He knows everything. I asked him "If you were going to buy a longarm machine for yourself or a family member, what brand would you choose?" Without hesitating he said there were only 2 brand on his list. #1 is APQS and #2 in Innova. I asked him why he put APQS ahead of Innova. He said that APQS is very easy to service - everything you need to access is right up front. "And besides", he said, "APQS never breaks down."
    Customer service is the best in the business. They will stay with you as long as you need to get an answer to even the dumbest question. Every dealer I have met has been happy, professional, knowledgeable, and accessible. When I checked in your area, there are 3 dealers near Atlanta. My own treasured dealer is Sheridan Carter in Hendersonville, NC.(828) 286-2390. She is hosting a Roadshow on July 21, starting at 1:00 pm. Check the APQS roadshow schedule to see when there is one in your area. A roadshow is a great way to play with all of the machines and get all of your questions answered. Here's the link: https://www.apqs.com/events/?tribe_eventcategory=296.
  22. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from Quilta93 in New quilt pattern on Craftsy.com: Murphy's Corner   
    Hey there everyone. I have just published a new, super easy quilt pattern on Craftsy.com. It's called Murphy's Corner and is perfect for the new piecer or improving beginner. Check it out at: Murphy's Corner by Sharon Deming
     

  23. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from Oma in New quilt pattern on Craftsy.com: Murphy's Corner   
    Hey there everyone. I have just published a new, super easy quilt pattern on Craftsy.com. It's called Murphy's Corner and is perfect for the new piecer or improving beginner. Check it out at: Murphy's Corner by Sharon Deming
     

  24. Like
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from NHDeb in New quilt pattern on Craftsy.com: Murphy's Corner   
    Hey there everyone. I have just published a new, super easy quilt pattern on Craftsy.com. It's called Murphy's Corner and is perfect for the new piecer or improving beginner. Check it out at: Murphy's Corner by Sharon Deming
     

  25. Upvote
    Sharon Deming got a reaction from quilterkp in New quilt pattern on Craftsy.com: Murphy's Corner   
    Hey there everyone. I have just published a new, super easy quilt pattern on Craftsy.com. It's called Murphy's Corner and is perfect for the new piecer or improving beginner. Check it out at: Murphy's Corner by Sharon Deming