doodlebug

right/wrong side of Warm and Natural batt

22 posts in this topic

(i'm avoiding doing what i really should be doing)

here's a picture of the right/and wrong side of warm and natural batting.

you can save the picture to your computer (PC, don't have a mac) by right clicking your mouse in the picture and selecting "save as" and saving it to somewhere you can find it later...

post--13461906716834_thumb.jpg

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Well, that figures - I just loaded and started one less than ten minutes ago, apparently wrong side up :) Printed & saved to place by the machine. What're the downsides of using the wrong side up? And thank you so much for doing this!

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I did some practice quilts with warm and natural when I first got my Millie. I loaded right side up on one and then decided to try the other way. I ended up with pokies of batting coming out on the back. So I definitly agree the needling holes side should be next to the wrong side of the top as you stated. I don't know if this was the reason for this side up but I have had no problem since I have loaded it this way every since my experiment. Hope you don't have this problem since you have already started quilting.

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peggy is right- if loaded upside down, W&N batt will beard something awful.

my general rule of thumb with ANY batt is too look real close at both sides and load the side that has the obvious 'V' needling holes to look at the ceiling (most batts are needled to secure the fibers together somehow)...

even Dream Quilters battings (cotton and the polys) have distinct needling holes.

the only one i found that it really doesn't matter is Hobbs 80/20...it seems that either side will work when loaded.

since my customers supply their batting, i have all types walk thru the door and i've been taking notes. i also ask that they do not remove the batt from the packaging so i can read all the 'manufactuer's suggestions'

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Good idea, I actually took a little square of batting and keep it on the wall where I load quilts I stuck a little note on it saying "this side up" so I am sure to load it correctly...it is sometimes hard to remember...

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Shannon - by the "v" needles holes do you mean the side where the needle has gone into the batting and caused a 'divet' or the side where the needle has pushed out and caused a 'mountain'.

Lyn

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Hi kids,

Since I only buy Warm & Natual on the bolt from the factory, I've found that the backing side is always the folded together side. What I mean is, while you unroll the bolt, the batting is folded in half to make it a 45" bolt. Now, the backing or smooth side of the batting is the side on the inside of the fold. So, when you unfold the batting, that backing side is on the inside. As you unroll the bolt you see the quilt top side folded in half to conceal the backing side. Just remember that the backing side is folded right sides together. Hopefully this helps. zeke...........

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Funny this is just the reverse of what I was told to do...and I have been hating the bearding...going back to what seem natural to begin with....thanks guys

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using hobbs 80/20 and for about the 100th time, but this time i panic ~ wondering which side should go up?

this place is so helpful - i love it when i find an answer here without having to repeat a question.

posting under the right forum is so helpful - i always think of it after i have posted my bloody questions. :mad:

thanks for doing it with this batting post, shannon! saved me a bit of time which i'm very short on these days. ;);)

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Dimples up, Pimples down. :) For any needle-punched batting, if one side looks like a sweater in need of a shave (lots of slubs or pimples) that side is the wrong side. Here's another visual I use in class to help people remember:

Imagine taking a bag of cotton balls, pulling them apart, and then laying the fibers every which way over a window screen laid flat. Hose the cotton down with water, (and you can even imagine poking the cotton many times with a needle, down through the cotton and out the screen on the other side). Let the cotton dry, and then peel it off of the screen. What will you see?

You'll see dimples or the "divots" Shannon mentions on the top of the cotton, and hills, slubs or bumps on the screen-side of the cotton. That's the wrong side.

You want your quilting machine needle to penetrate the cotton the same way the needle punching machine did at the batting factory. This will reduce batting bearding and migration.

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Doodles, you are always right on! Thanks for making this very clear. I love visuals!!!! I have only ever had one quilt to beard and the batting was in correctly. I finally decided it was the backing that was very thin that was encouraging this mess. I will also save this! Blessings.

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Another tip about batting "top or bottom side" of batting... Remember that if it's in a package, when you take it out of the wrapper, the "top" side is facing OUT. So when I unfold from the package, I make sure that the top side is facing me. That way I don't get mixed up (which is easy for me to do cuz I'm a dork)

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Hmmmmmm! I wonder how many times I loaded the batting in wrong side up. Guess I should have read all of these great tips before I started quilting. The downside of teaching myself. Oh well; if it doesn't kill you it only makes you stronger. :blush:

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