ffq-lar

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  1. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from yankiequilter in Suggestions needed for quilter's estate sale!   
    I'm sending good thoughts and a gentle hug, Lin.
    As for the quilter's garage sale---it should be advertised exactly as that and you'll be overrun with buyers. I've seen several pricing methods. One was by the yard---the buyer measured the fabric she wanted on the honor system and paid for the total yardage---$5 per yard. FQs and smaller pieces were done by weight--$5 per pound. A yard of good quality fabric is a bit less than a pound. This way, no one had to measure and price each piece, which takes an army if there is a big stash. Don't do any cutting! Notions in close-to-perfect shape/rulers with instructions, etc---half regular retail. Used notions and partial spools of thread--set up a table with everything the same price---like $2. For our quilt guild boutique at the last show we bagged like-items (six zippers, 5 spools of thread, used notions, buttons, etc, into $2 grab bags. Those went fast! Here's the other method I saw recently. Regular sized paper grocery bags---all you can fit in the bag for $20. This way, only minimal sorting and no pricing. The fabric that was left was sold two week later at $15 per bag. The price went down every couple of weeks until most of the stuff was gone. Put "Prices Firm" signs out so there's no haggling. Quilters know a bargain when they see it. Good luck!
  2. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Primitive1 in Basting a Customer Quilt   
    Hi Dory! Attached is the spacing and pathway I use for basting for hand-quilters. It would work fine for DSM quilting as well. I use a long stitch length and thick, slippery, contrasting thread for ease of removal. This path requires no long vertical stitching but you still end up with a grid. The customer can remove the stitching as she goes or save it until the end. I charge a half-cent per square inch and usually do only one a year.  

  3. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from delld in Basting a Customer Quilt   
    Hi Dory! Attached is the spacing and pathway I use for basting for hand-quilters. It would work fine for DSM quilting as well. I use a long stitch length and thick, slippery, contrasting thread for ease of removal. This path requires no long vertical stitching but you still end up with a grid. The customer can remove the stitching as she goes or save it until the end. I charge a half-cent per square inch and usually do only one a year.  

  4. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Basting a Customer Quilt   
    Hi Dory! Attached is the spacing and pathway I use for basting for hand-quilters. It would work fine for DSM quilting as well. I use a long stitch length and thick, slippery, contrasting thread for ease of removal. This path requires no long vertical stitching but you still end up with a grid. The customer can remove the stitching as she goes or save it until the end. I charge a half-cent per square inch and usually do only one a year.  

  5. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from NHDeb in My new written policy re: donation quilting   
    I'll just share that I will be sending a registered letter tomorrow to a "friend" who did something creative with a quilt I had expected to be in a charity silent auction. The letter contains the words "misrepresentation", "misappropriation of funds", and "small claims court". If I see any cash, I'll donate to the charity it was originally meant to benefit.
    "Don't mess with me, I'm somebody's mother. I've taken on much tougher than you." Lyrics from one of my favorite songs!
  6. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Wondering   
    A couple of things would help. It looks like the quilt shrunk when it was washed and that crinkled look (which many find desirable) caused the quilting to be not as prominent. Make sure the fabrics have all been washed, both for shrinkage and dye bleed, and that the batting used has little or no shrinkage. That would be 100% poly or several blends, though cotton batting in any percentage will shrink some.  That way, after quilting there will be no shrinkage to cause that "blending" of the quilting. If you have no control over customer quilts, communicate with them as to fabric and batting shrinkage if it's destined for a show. As you can imagine, the award-winners at shows have been carefully assembled with fabric that has been shrunk, treated, starched, measured carefully at every step, and while maybe not washed, at least dampened and blocked. That will retain the crispness of the fabric and the stitch definition of the quilting. So, proper fabric handling and a proper fiber content of the batting will help. Washing and drying in machines will age your quilts. Hand-laundering and laying flat to dry will keep them the same condition and size for a long time.
  7. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dianedamico in Regulated stitch mode on Millie   
    If your Millie is newer, it is equipped with Quilt Glide, which smooths out the stitches when doing micro-stitching. If it is on, it will continue to slowly make stitches when you pause in regulated mode. Find the switch to turn it off. If you have an older machine, the needle-up/down speed can be adjusted easily and if it's making extra stitches when you stop, it needs to be slowed a bit. Look in your manual or on the site---look under "support" and then "commonly asked questions" for instructions on how to adjust a small screw under the hood to alter the speed of your needle up/down. Good luck.
  8. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Free to new home Ultimate II   
    You have a taker, Joyce! A quilter named Teri would love to give this a new home. Message me your contact information and I'll pass it along.  lindarech@comcast.net  
     
  9. Like
    ffq-lar reacted to MB_quilt in APQS Millenium for sale (estate sale) *** REDUCED ***   
    Hi there. Its 12 foot rollers.  I'll send you a separate email.
     
  10. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Just for Fun...Improbable Quilting Business Names   
    Do You Feel Lucky, Punk, Creative Quilting
    My Way Or The Highway Machine Quilting
    Passive-Aggressive Longarm Quilting (right down the road from Shana's Manic Depressive MQS!)
    Big Old Huge Stitches in a Funny Color Thread Quilting Company
    Stashbusters Unite Machine Quilting
    If Life Gives You Melons You Might Be Dyslexic Stitching
    (this is fun!--my fave is Shana's "You Want Me To Quilt Your Ugly Quilt? Ha! Machine QS!)
  11. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in batting costs   
    If you are selling batting on a roll, do as the quilt shops do and sell by the length, giving them the off-cuts to take home. I figure out the cost per running inch (like W&W is $.27 per inch) and do the math. I charge full retail so I'm not undercutting my friends at the LQS. If you would like to use the extra yourself,  post where your customer will be writing her check that you will gladly accept donations of batting pieces for your charity quilting. I also sell unusual kinds and sizes of packaged batting. King size wool is a big seller for me.
  12. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Southern Quilts in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  13. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Gail O in Trimming Question   
    I never trim a customer quilt, even if there is a massive amount of backer or batting left when finished. I do trim the bottom edge of batting if I need to roll back to do more quilting, since otherwise that extra can bunch up when reversed and cause problems---but I trim so two inches of batting extends beyond the edge. You never know what the customers plan is. She may want to fold the backer to the front for binding. She may want a binding wider than 1/4". If you've used double batting or something puffy like wool, enclosing the edge may take a wider binding to get a consistent width. I've never had anyone ask for trimming and never offered the service. Too many ways it can go wrong, especially if the quilt isn't square. 
  14. Like
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LinneaMarie in Trimming Question   
    I never trim a customer quilt, even if there is a massive amount of backer or batting left when finished. I do trim the bottom edge of batting if I need to roll back to do more quilting, since otherwise that extra can bunch up when reversed and cause problems---but I trim so two inches of batting extends beyond the edge. You never know what the customers plan is. She may want to fold the backer to the front for binding. She may want a binding wider than 1/4". If you've used double batting or something puffy like wool, enclosing the edge may take a wider binding to get a consistent width. I've never had anyone ask for trimming and never offered the service. Too many ways it can go wrong, especially if the quilt isn't square. 
  15. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quiltmonkey in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  16. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from RosemaryJ08 in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  17. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Lovemyavy in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  18. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from AnnP in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  19. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from quilterkp in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  20. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from LisaC in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  21. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from mamu in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  22. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from micajah in Letter from Himself (RitaR's husband)   
    Rita and Roland visiting Dennis and me in 2009.

  23. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from dbams in Loyal customers. ???   
    No one has replied, so I will gingerly step in and give you my take on the problem. Adding a computer to your machine does not mean that you should raise your prices above the industry standard, especially for overall designs. The customer doesn't care how you get there or what you use---they are interested in the finished product and don't want to pay extra for computerized when someone else can do the same thing for less. I'm talking about pantos/overalls, not custom. Also, you have "niched" yourself. You have inadvertently sent a message to your customers that you are out of the panto/overall business by showing lots of custom quilting. Custom=$$$$ to everyone. Make some simple quilt tops and quilt them with overalls or a panto and show them everywhere. Remind them that you're still around and offering the less-expensive quilting. I think your customers perception of what you offer and your pricing has been muddled---that you are now too expensive. To get them back in the fold, use your favorite method to contact them and offer a blow-them-away deal on pantos and overalls "exclusively for you, my favorite customer". Any size quilt up to a Queen (you supply the limit for dimensions) with a choice of three pantos/computerized or freehand overall (not a big meander) for $100. This will price you at less than a cent-and-a-half, but will give your business a boost. They will dig out all the big UFOs and maybe get one done as a Christmas gift. Limit the number (like first 20 quilts) and limit the month---like November only or first two weeks in January. See if that will nudge them back to you. Good luck---it's disheartening when the customers you think are friends stop becoming customers.
  24. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from whitepinesquilter in My very first RUDE customer and I've been quilting for 11 years!   
    It's human nature to let one nasty incident overshadow hundreds of happy interactions. You have my sympathy and a hug from Washington. This has happened to me a few times, but never as blatant as this. If she isn't old enough to be losing her filters due to dementia, cut her loose. If she calls, remind her that she seemed unhappy the last time and perhaps she might search for another longarmer more to her liking. Be sweet, matter-of-fact, and don't let her suck you in again. It's such an ego-blow when they don't love what you do. You offered a fix and she declined. It still stings, but you keep doing you, sweet Shana!
  25. Upvote
    ffq-lar got a reaction from Debbie Turner in Selling my Millie   
    You're at the right place. Post the model, year made, serial number, photos, if you bought it new, how much it was used, when it was used last, when or if it's been serviced, what accessories come with it (power advance, stand-along bobbin winder, extra bobbin cases, hydraulic lifts, pantos, thread?), where you are located, and how much you're asking. A perk for potential buyers is the offer to help break down/ship or to deliver within a certain area, with or without a charge. You can ask for messages and inquiries to be posted here or you may post a phone number and/or email address. If you want messages here only, monitor the post. Delete your post when it sells. You can also partner with an APQS dealer to help with the sale. They may have someone waiting for a used machine to become available. You can offer them a finder's fee. Good luck!